AVID

AVID - Advancement Via Individual Determination

What Is AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination)?

AVID is a program that helps prepare students for college. It promotes higher levels of thinking, preparation for rigorous courses, student ownership of education, and organizational/study skills. The AVID model targets students in the academic middle - B, C, and even D students - who have the desire to go to college and the willingness to work hard.


Please note that the student taking the AVID elective at Stiles Middle School may look different from what is described on the AVID website. Since the goal of AVID is to prepare students for high school and address the four dimensions of College and Career Readiness (CCR), our hope is that ALL students benefit from the AVID philosophy. We accomplish this task in four ways:

1. The AVID elective class

2. Cornell note taking system

3. The AVID binder

4. Use of the AVID curriculum.


AVID Elective Class

At Stiles Middle School, seventh and eighth grade students take AVID in place of the Academic and Personal Success (APS) class. However, the AVID elective is not an open enrollment class. The selection process, which begins in January, involves teacher nomination, completed application, and an oral interview. Many factors go into making sure the AVID elective class and student are the "right fit".


2011 AVID Senior Data

"A record 27,891 AVID seniors participated in AVID’s annual data collection reporting details about their demographics and academic achievements. Hispanic/Latino students led the reporting with 55 percent; 17 percent of the students were African American and 15 percent of the students were white. A total of 69 percent of the students were eligible for free or reduced lunch." To learn about their accomplishments and goals, please read the attached document.


Cornell Notes

The Cornell process is a widely-used note taking system devised in the 1950s by Walter Pauk, an education professor at Cornell University. Pauk advocated its use in his best-selling book, "How to Study in College", but its use has spread most rapidly in the past decade. All students at SMS are asked to organize their notes in such a way where they list the topics covered, take abbreviated notes over these topics, and then use their own words to summarize their learning.


AVID Binder System

The Cornell process is a widely-used note taking system devised in the 1950s by Walter Pauk, an education professor at Cornell University. Pauk advocated its use in his best-selling book, "How to Study in College", but its use has spread most rapidly in the past decade.All students at SMS are asked to organize their notes in such a way where they list the topics covered, take abbreviated notes over these topics, and then use their own words to summarize their learning.


AVID Curriculum

In order to prepare students for college, they must be exposed to higher levels of rigor. AVID provides content area teachers with research based curriculum strategies to implement in ALL classrooms.


AVID curriculum includes the following:

1. Cornell Notes – students will work up to taking notes in at least three classes

2. Notebook organization, calendars, assignment records

3. Writing component, often in conjunction with school writing projects

4. Higher level questioning skills

5. Collaborative tutorial support

6. Vocabulary related to core subjects as well as SAT vocabulary

7. Study skills

8. Test taking strategies

9. Career and college exploration and related vocabulary

10. Philosophical Chairs/Socratic Seminars