Junior AP English

Mrs. Herron

Essential Question: What can we learn about the topics explored in Barbara Kingsolver's novel, The Bean Trees?

Choose one of the following topics to research:

  • Sexism
  • Nonconformity
  • Treatment of Women by Men
  • Abuse
    • Emotional Abuse
    • Domestic Violence
    • Child Abuse
  • Unhealthy Habits: How do you break an unhealthy cycle/situation/relationship?
  • Family Values/ What Makes a Family?
  • Single Motherhood
  • Sisterhood of Women
  • Independence/Self-Growth
  • Racism and/or Stereotyping Based on One's Looks
  • Illegal Immigration
  • People Who Help Illegal Immigrants To Be Safe
  • Working Conditions of the Poor

There are three databases that will be useful for researching most of the above topics.

These databases normally cost money, but you can access them for free from our Library Website. Click on the link, and then click on "Use My Location".

You can access them without a Username or Password from any location within New York State.

The best databases for this project are:

      • Opposing Viewpoints in Context (Understand both sides of today’s most controversial social issues.)
      • Research in Context (User-friendly design makes it easy to browse and explore many different topics. You can sign in with Google and bookmark, highlight, and add notes to articles. It also saves your Search History, so it will be easy to find articles again if you forget to save them. It even has a dictionary and educator resources. This is a great research tool!
      • Encyclopedia Britannica High School Edition

Domestic Violence:

Emotional Abuse

Child Abuse

Family Values/ What Makes a Family?

Racism and/or Stereotyping Based on One's Looks:

We have access to three databases that can give you excellent information on this topic. Click on "Use My Location" to access them for free from anywhere within New York State. Search for the keyword "racism". Here they are:

      • Opposing Viewpoints in Context (Understand both sides of today’s most controversial social issues.)
      • Research in Context (User-friendly design makes it easy to browse and explore many different topics. You can sign in with Google and bookmark, highlight, and add notes to articles. It also saves your Search History, so it will be easy to find articles again if you forget to save them. It even has a dictionary and educator resources. This is a great research tool!
      • Encyclopedia Britannica High School Edition

Websites/Articles:

Illegal Immigration

(Note: This topic is very controversial and divisive. It is difficult, if not outright impossible, to find resources that are not biased. I have done my best to only include articles that are research-based, but it was impossible to find ones that were entirely free from bias. There are a lot more articles available online. No matter which articles you use, please watch out for bias and be careful to distinguish between proven facts and opinions. --Ms. Q)

We have access to three databases that can give you excellent information on this topic. Click on "Use My Location" to access them for free from anywhere within New York State. Search for "illegal immigrants" and/or "illegal immigration". Here they are:

Websites:

People Who Help Illegal Immigrants to Be Safe

(Note: This topic is very controversial and divisive. It is difficult, if not outright impossible, to find resources that are not biased. I have done my best to only include articles that are research-based, but it was impossible to find ones that were entirely free from bias. There are a lot more articles available online. No matter which articles you use, please watch out for bias and be careful to distinguish between proven facts and opinions. --Ms. Q)

Working Conditions of the Poor

MLA Citations

The last page of your paper should be a Works Cited page. List your resources in alphabetical order (by the first word in each citation) on your Works Cited page. The first line of each citation starts at the margin, but any additional lines must be indented. Each type of resource must be cited in a specific way.

To cite from a database, click the "Cite" option; then choose MLA style and copy and paste the citation that you are given. Here are the ways to cite other common sources:

To Cite an Article from an Online Newspaper or Magazine:

Author's name. "Article Title in quotation marks)", Newspaper or Magazine Title (in italics), publisher name, publication date, URL, and the date of access. For example:

Bernstein, Mark. “10 Tips on Writing the Living Web.” A List Apart: For People Who Make Websites, 16 Aug. 2002, alistapart.com/article/

writeliving. Accessed 4 May 2016.

To Cite an Individual Page on a Website:

  • Author's Name (if known). "Title of Specific Page (in quotation marks)." Title of Website (in italics). Publisher or Sponsor (often an organization), Date of Publication/Creation (if available-Day, Month, Year), URL (without https://). Access Date (Day, Month, Year). Note: If the publisher is the same as the website name, only list it once. For example:

“Athlete's Foot - Topic Overview.” WebMD, 25 Sept. 2014, www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/tc/athletes-foot-topic-overview.

Accessed 20 Sept. 2018.

Lundman, Susan. “How to Make Vegetarian Chili.” eHow, www.ehow.com/how_10727_make-vegetarian-chili.html. Accessed 6 July 2015.

"MLA Works Cited: Electronic Sources (Web Publications)". Purdue Online Writing Lab. Purdue University, 2018.

owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and citation/mla_style/mla_formatting_and_style_guide/mla_works_cited_electronic_sources.html.

Accessed 28 Feb. 2019.

To Cite an Entire Website:

  • Editor, Author, or Compiler name (if available). Name of Site. Name of Publisher or Sponsor, Date of Publication/Creation (if available-Day, Month, Year), URL (without https://). Date of access (Day, Month, Year). For example:

Quinlivan, Ann. Bishop Kearney High School Library. Bishop Kearney High School. sites.google.com/kearneyhs.org/kearneylibrary/.

Accessed 3 March 2019.

Felluga, Dino. Guide to Literary and Critical Theory. Purdue University, 28 Nov. 2003, www.cla.purdue.edu/english/theory/. Accessed 10 May

2006.

To Cite Something from a Book with One Author:

  • Last Name, First Name. Title of Book. City of Publication, Publisher, Publication Date, Page or Pages (if you are only using a specific section of the book). For example:

Gleick, James. Chaos: Making a New Science. Penguin, 1987.

Henley, Patricia. The Hummingbird House. MacMurray, 1999, pp. 25-38.

Here is a Works Cited Sample Page that could help you see how to organize your page.

You can find more details and examples on how to cite all types of resources here:

"MLA Works Cited: Electronic Sources", from Purdue University Online Writing Lab (OWL at Purdue)

"MLA Works Cited Page: Books", from Purdue University Online Writing Lab (OWL at Purdue)

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In-Text Citations

For Print Sources:

  • For a book with one author: (author's last name page #). For example:

“In a world as wrong as this one, all we can do is make things as right as we can" (Kinsgsolver 152).

  • If you mention your author's last name in your sentence, you only have to create an in-text citation for the page number: (page #). ExL

As Barbara Kingsolver wrote, “In a world as wrong as this one, all we can do is make things as right as we can" (152).

  • There are specific rules for other print sources, such as books with more than one author, works with a corporate author, a work in an anthology, etc. You must find the specific rule that matches your specific type of resource.

For Digital Sources:

These can be confusing because they don't have page numbers. In-text citations don't require a page number from a digital source (unless a page number is clearly shown, which is rare). For digital sources, follow these guidelines:

  • Include in either your sentence or at the end of your sentence (inside the parentheses) the first item that appears in the Work Cited entry that corresponds to the citation (e.g. author name, article name, website name, film name).
  • You do not need to give paragraph numbers or page numbers.
  • If you are starting your in-text citation with your Website name, just include the partial URL that identifies the site's name, such as: (CNN.com). or (Forbes.com). Don't write out the URL; you already have that on your Works Cited page.
  • If you mention the author or Website name in the sentence: Since you don't have a page number, you are finished with your in-text citation. You do not have to give any parenthetical citation at all.

For example:

North Korea is threatening to suspend talks with the United States (CNN.com)

According to CNN.com, North Korea is threatening to suspend talks with the United States.

You can find more details and examples on how to create in-text citations for all types of resources here:

"MLA In-Text Citations: The Basics", from Purdue University Online Writing Lab (OWL at Purdue)

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Citation Machine (free online citation tool)

Note: Citation Machine is not perfect, but if you input the URL of an electronic source, it can usually find the source and help you create the citation. Make sure to choose MLA style and the correct source type (Website, newspaper, book, etc.). You will often have to fill in additional information. You ALWAYS have to add the Date Accessed to the end of the citation.

Please remember that you still have to double-check that the citation is correct. You can't blame Citation Machine if your citation isn't correct; it is up to you to check it and make any necessary corrections. This is just a tool to assist you, not to do it for you.