Virtual HĀ Huakaʻi Archive

Situated in Kailua on the banks of Kawainui on the land known as Kūkanono, the Ulupō heiau is the largest agricultural heiau on Oʻahu. Springs flow out of the base of the heiau and into loʻi kalo that have fed people for over 1000 years. Kauluakalana is a non-profit organization that aims to cultivate meaningful relationships between people and place through the sharing of cultural stories, eating food grown on the land, and turning our hands to the ground to work. We use the name Ulupō Nui to describe the land that encompasses Ulupō heiau and the surrounding loʻi kalo.​ Join Kaleo as he introduces us to the wai of this ʻāina kahiko (ancient land).

*Note: This week's feature includes both an ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi version and an English version.

If you would like to explore more of the wonderful possibilities for collaboration with Kauluakalana, please feel free to visit their website at www.kauluakalana.org or contact them at kaleo@kauluakalana.org.

Amidst the bustling economic areas of Līhuʻe and Nāwiliwili lay the quiet refuges of Hulēʻia river and Alakoko pond. Mālama Hulēʻia is a non-profit organization that aims to re-establish native wetland ecosystems along Hulēʻia river and provide an environmental stewardship program that honors Hawaiian values and practices while perpetuating community pride. Join Peleke as he reminds us of the importance of hana kūpono (protocol) when visiting spaces; and introduces us to the history of Hulēʻia, its surrounding areas as well as its natural inhabitants.

If you would like to explore more about their work and opportunities for collaboration with Mālama Hulēʻia, please feel free to visit their website at malamahuleia.org or contact them at info@malamahuleia.org.

Growing out of a need presented by the community, Mālama Learning Center was created as a resource in West O‘ahu bringing art, science, conservation, and culture together in order to promote sustainable living. Among many others, Ola Nā Kini is one of their signature programs that is a native and edible forest regeneration program designed to heal the land, ocean, and multitude of life. Join the Mālama Learning Center hui on a trip to their mauka nursery at Pālehua and learn about the many native Hawaiian plants being propagated to support and sustain all life. May the multitudes live!

If you would like to see additional videos as well as explore more of the programs and possibilities for collaboration with Mālama Learning Center please feel free to visit their website at www.malamalearningcenter.org or contact them at info@malamalearningcenter.org.

Nestled at the base of Olomana, in the middle of a residential community, lay a kipuka that is home to a bustling revival of ʻāina, ʻai, and aloha. Since 2007, ʻohana Wilhelm has been working to revive the once thriving ʻāina of Kapalai. Through the positive intentions of one ʻohana and the many helping hands of support, Hoʻokuaʻāina has been able to share a space with us that fosters connection, nourishment and restoration (of ʻāina and kānaka). Through intentional programming, Hoʻokuaʻāina offers opportunities for all to: reconnect to a sense of purpose through ʻāina; strengthen ʻohana; encourage fellowship and the building of healthy relationships; and most of all “rebuild lives from the ground up.” E ola e Kapunawaiolaokapalai!

If you would like to explore more about their work as well as the education resources and opportunities for collaboration with Hoʻokuaʻāina, please feel free to visit their website at hookuaaina.org or contact them at info@hookuaaina.org.

Nestled in between Keahiakahoe and ʻIolekaʻa and located in the ahupuaʻa of Heʻeia in the ʻili of Waipao, Papahana Kuaola is a mālama ʻāina based learning organization that is connecting the area's past with a sustainable future. The mission of this organization is to create quality learning focused on Hawaiʻi's cultural and natural resources, environmental restoration, and economic sustainability fully integrated with Hawaiian knowledge in order to exemplify a lifestyle respectful of kānaka, ʻāina, and akua. Join the crew in exploring the abundance of Haʻikū as they share the moʻolelo of this place and the magic that is wai.

If you would like to explore more about their work as well as the education resources and opportunities for collaboration with Papahana Kuaola, please feel free to visit their website at https://papahanakuaola.org or contact them at info@papahanakuaola.org.

Once populated with two thriving ancient Hawaiian villages, an extensive inland fishpond and several heiau, the Waihe‘e Coastal Dunes and Wetlands Refuge is considered to be among some of the most significant cultural landscapes in Hawaiʻi. Hawaiian Islands Land Trust (HILT) took ownership of this 277-acre site in 2004, thereby protecting it from development, and safeguarding community access. Active restoration programs have enhanced critical native wildlife habitat, while preserving the area’s rich archaeological and cultural resources. HILT welcomes community and youth to be a part of stewarding the land through community work days, talk story on the land walks, field trips, and camping. Join students from three Maui high schools who are a part of Maui Huliau Foundationʻs filmmaking program as they partner with HILT to introduce us to Waiheʻe.

If you would like to explore more about their work as well as the education resources and opportunities for collaboration with Hawaiian Island Land Trust, please feel free to visit their website at www.hilt.org or contact them at info@hilt.org. This video was created in partnership with Maui Huliau Foundation, providing Hawaiʻi-based curriculum. Teachers and students in grades 8-12 can visit mauihuliaufoundation.org/classroom to register for free access to the Google Classrooms featuring huakaʻi across Maui and accompanying curriculum materials.

Paepae o Heʻeia is a private non-profit dedicated to caring for Heʻeia Fishpond, an 800 year-old ancient Hawaiian fishpond located in Heʻeia, Koʻolaupoko, Oʻahu. Heʻeia Fishpond is a kuapā (walled) style fishpond enclosing 88 acres of brackish water. The kuapā is built on the Malaukaʻa fringing reef that extends from the shoreline surrounding the pond out into Kāneʻohe Bay - possibly the longest at 1.3 miles long. The vision is to perpetuate a foundation of cultural sustainability for ‘ohana of Hawaiʻi through education using the strengths of the fishpond as a place of learning to weave ancestral knowledge together with western ways of knowing. Join the crew as they share about the kiaʻi of this place and get us to ask ourselves, "ʻo wai nā kiaʻi o koʻu ʻāina (who are the guardians of my land)?"

If you would like to explore more about their work as well as the education resources and opportunities for collaboration with Paepae o Heʻeia, please feel free to contact them at kanaloa@paepaeoheeia.org.