Robo-Archive

Finished: 19th

Wins: 5

Losses: 4

2008

On our Rookie year the game was called FIRST Overdrive. In it, teams competed to complete counterclockwise laps around a central barrier while manipulating large Trackballs over and under overpasses to score additional points.

2009

This year's game was called Lunacy. The goal of this game was to score as many of the game pieces in the opposing side's trailers as possible. Robots started out in front of the opposite alliance's students. Empty cells had to be handed to a robot by the Payload Specialist at the mid-field position known as the Outpost. The robot then must deliver the Empty Cell to their human player on one of the corners in order to get a Super Cell that is worth 15 points. A robot can only carry one Empty Cell at a time. Super Cells can only be put into play during the last 20 seconds of play, and only if the human player has been delivered an Empty Cell.

Finished: 54th

Wins: 3

Losses: 6

Finished: 24th

Wins: 3

Losses: 4

Ties: 2

2010

In this game, called Breakaway, balls are kicked or herded into goals located in the corners of the fields. There were two goals for each alliance, adding up to 4 goals total. Every ball scored = 1 point. At the end of a match, bonus points are awarded for robots that cling onto either of the two towers in the center of the field. More bonus points are awarded if alliance robots can suspend themselves from the robot clinging onto the tower.

2011

This year's game was called Logo Motion. In this game the robot tries to score Ubertubes onto pegs on the scoring grid. 105 seconds after the Autonomous Period, Students drive their robots around the field, trying to score points using any game piece except for Ubertubes. At fifteen seconds to the end, the tower bases flash their alliance color. Minibots could be deployed onto the towers in the final 10 seconds to score extra points. They were only to be deployed during this period.

Finished: 18th

Wins: 5

Losses: 7

Ties: 1

Finished: 34th

Wins: 4

Losses: 5

2012

This game was called Rebound Rumble. In it Alliances compete in 135-second matches to earn as many points as possible by scoring basketballs through hoops or by balancing tilt bridges. At the end of the match, points were scored for balanced alliance bridges, but not the Coopertition bridge.

2013

In this game, titled Ultimate Ascent, Teams started with up to 2 or 3 discs on their robot at the beginning of a match. Only the 6 discs of an alliance's color count when scored on top of a pyramid. White or opposing colored discs will not count if scored in the pyramid. Since the human players may not put any colored discs in play until teleoperated, scoring in the pyramid is not possible in autonomous. Teams can score points as follows by scoring discs into goals. The match ended with robots attempting to climb pyramid shaped game elements located on the field. Robots earned points by climbing the pyramid based on how high they climbed.

Finished: 39th

Wins: 3

Losses: 7

Won Creativity Award Sponsored by Xerox

Finished: 39th

Wins: 4

Losses: 6

2014

In this game, called Aerial Assist, the alliances win via getting volleyballs into scoring areas located on the far end of the field. The game starts with each robots in either the White Zone (center field) or the goalie zones. They could be pre-loaded with 1 game ball prior to the start. Every robot that moved from the center to their own side of the field earned a five point bonus. The students then would transfer a ball onto the playing field. The robots can then do either the basic goal score (take the ball to the other end of the field), or assist them in doing so which earned bonus points. Throwing the ball over the midpoint overhang when transferring will add additional points. A robot in the goalie zones could block shots by extending upwards.

2015

In Recycle Rush Robots picked up totes and stacked them on scoring platforms. They put pool noodles or Litter inside recycling containers, and put the containers on top of scoring stacks of totes. There was also a co-operation aspect of the game where both alliances could pool their totes and stack them on a step dividing the field to each gain twenty points. Along with these robot actions, students could attempt to throw the pool noodles across the field to gain four points for each noodle left in the opposing alliance's work zone.

Finished: 11th

Wins: 9

Losses: 3

Won Innovation in Control Award sponsored by Rockwell Automation

Finished: 11th

Wins: 9

Losses: 3

2016

This year's game was titled FIRST Stronghold the object of the game was to breach the opponent's defenses as well as capture their tower by first firing small foam balls, or Boulders at it, and then surrounding or scaling the tower using a singular rung on the tower wall. Points were scored by crossing elements of the tower's outer works, shooting boulders into the opposing tower's five goals in order to lower the tower strength, and by surrounding and scaling the tower.

2017

In FIRST Steamworks teams were required to shoot wiffle balls which represented fuel into a simulated boiler which transfers the generated steam into an airship in the middle of the field. Each alliance had one airship, which they pressurize with steam from the boiler and load with plastic gears from the field. At the end of the match, robots could climb and hang on team-supplied ropes attached to the airship for additional points.

Finished: 8th

Wins: 6

Losses: 4

Finished: 15th

Wins: 6

Losses: 5

2018

This year's game was FIRST Powered up . It required robots to place milk crates or Power Cubes, on large balancing scales to tip the scale and gain ownership. Alliances could also trade power cubes for power-ups giving them a temporary advantage in a match. At the end of the match, robots could climb the tower attached to the center balancing scale using a rung attached to the tower, giving them additional points.

2019

This game was called Destination: Deep Space. It involved three teams each competing to place poly-carbonate hatch panels and orange rubber balls or Cargo on rockets and cargo ships before returning to their H.A.B. platform to climb at the end of the match.

Finished: 9th

Wins: 6

Losses: 5

Finished: 42nd

Wins: 4

Losses: 5

2020

In 2020, Infinite Recharge consisted of two alliances racing to collect and score Foam Balls or Power Cells in order to energize their Shield Generator for maximum protection. To activate stages of the Shield Generator, the robots manipulated spinning wheels, or Control Panels after scoring a specific number of Power Cells. Near the end of the match, the robots race to their Rendezvous Point, the center of the playing field, to get their Shield Generator, an overhanging set of bars, operational. In order for it to work, robots must latch onto their alliance's balance beam to score the most points. The most were awarded to the alliance with all three robots being on the beam at the same time.


Due to the Coronavirus Pandemic, we were in the 50% of FIRST teams to compete in the 2020 season propper.

2021

In Game Changers: Infinite Recharge At Home, Students will compete with teams from around the globe, regardless of region, in five mini challenges inspired by Infinite Recharge. Those challenges include the AutoNav Challenge, an autonomous obstacle course, the Hyperdrive Challenge, a teleop obstacle course, the Galactic Search Challenge, where robots autonomously have to find a hidden game piece, the Interstellar Accuracy Challenge, a scoring challenge by scoring points through different holes in the Power Port, and the Power Port Challenge, a teleop score attack with one minute to score as many points as possible.