ELA

The Journey

The Journey challenges students to examine how people encountered over the course of one’s life influences how one will develop as an individual.

Anchor Texts

  • The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane by Kate DiCamillo
  • Velveteen Rabbit by Margery Williams
  • Word After Word After Word by Patricia MacLachlan
  • Love That Dog by Sharon Creech

Essential Questions

  • Concept Specific
    • How do people and events along life’s journey impact and influence an individual’s development?
  • Reading & Responding to Text
    • What is the author saying? What in the text reveals what the author is saying? (RL.4.1, RI.4.1)
    • How and why do individuals develop and interact throughout a text? (RL.4.3)
    • How does the structure of a text contribute to ability to understand text? (RL.4.5)
    • How does the author show his point of view? (RI.4.6)
    • How do an author’s choices impact the development of a text? (RI.4.8)
    • What is the value of reading multiple texts on the same theme or topic? (RL.4.9)
    • Can reading fluently affect comprehension of text? (RF.4.4)
  • Writing
    • How can real and imaginary experiences be structured for the reader? (W.4.3)
    • Which of life’s experiences would make a story worth sharing? (W.4.3)
    • How does the writing process help individuals strengthen their writing? (W.4.5)
  • Speaking and Listening
    • How can one make an effective presentation? (SL.4.4)
    • Who is my audience? Who will listen? How can one help an audience understand what is being shared? (SL.4.4)
  • Language
    • Why are the conventions of standard English grammar important for speakers and writers? (L.4.1)
    • How do conventions impact a readers understanding? (L.4.2)
    • How does one determine the meaning of a word in the text? (L.4.4)
    • How do words work together to create meaning? (L.4.5)
  • Foundational Skills
    • Use knowledge of all letter-sound correspondences, syllabication patterns, and morphology to read unfamiliar multisyllabic words in and out of context. (RF.4.3)
    • Read grade-level text with purpose and understanding (R.4.F4)
    • Read grade-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression. (RF.4.4)

Knowledge in Action

Knowledge in Action challenges students to understand that people are naturally driven to find answers. Through searching, trial and error, perseverance, and determination new knowledge is gained. This pushes people into action.

Anchor Texts

  • Hoot by Carl Hiaasen

Essential Questions

  • Concept Specific
    • How do people gain and use new knowledge?
    • How does new knowledge impact people?
  • Reading & Responding to Text
    • What is the author saying? What in the text reveals what the author is saying? (RL.4.1, RI.4.1)
    • What is the theme of the text as supported by the main idea and details? (RL.4.2, RI.4.2)
    • Which details should be included to clearly summarize the text? (RL.4.2, RI.4.2)
    • How have the main character’s values and morals affected their decisions and actions? (RL.4.3)
    • How does the structure help one understand the text? (RI.4.5)
    • How has understanding been enriched by studying multiple versions of the topic. (RL.4.7, RI.4.7)
  • Writing
    • What facts and details will support my argument? (W.4.1)
    • What questions best guide a writer on a given topic? (W.4.7)
    • How do authors select the best information to support their topic and put it in their own words? (W.4.8)
    • What evidence is needed to support an idea and how can it be used to strengthen writing? (W.4.9)
  • Speaking and Listening
    • How does an effective discussion occur? (SL.4.1)
    • How can I best demonstrate my understanding of this topic? (SL.4.2)
  • Language
    • What are the conventions of standard English grammar? (L.4.1fg)
    • How do conventions affect the understanding of what is read? (L.4.2abcd)
    • How is punctuation and language best used to convey correct meaning? (L.4.3b)
    • How does one use figurative language in writing? (L.4.5b)

What Shapes Our World

What Shapes Our World requires students to look back on historical events to see how our world and the people in it have been shaped by history. The way we live today is a result of what happened in the past.

Anchor Texts

  • Assorted Historical Fiction Short Stories
  • Freedom Songs: A Tale of the Underground Railroad by Trina Robbins
  • The Child’s Introduction to Greek Mythology by Heather Alexander
  • Greek Myth Plays by Carol Pugliano-Martin

Essential Questions

  • Reading & Responding to Text
    • Support inferences with key details and examples from the text. (RL.4.1, RI.4.1)
    • Determine the theme of a story, drama, or poem as well as summarize the text. (RL.4. 2)
    • Use specific details to describe the text in depth. (RL.4. 3)
    • Explain elements of the text including what happened and why. (RL.4. 3)
    • Explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text including what happened and why. (RI.4. 3)
    • Determine meaning of words and phrases including those that refer to mythological and theological characters. (RL.4.4)
    • Explain differences between poems, drama, and prose and refer to structural elements when writing or speaking. (RL.4. 5)
    • Describe overall structure of informational text. (RI.4.5)
    • Integrate information from two sources on the same topic to write or speak knowledgably. (RI.4.9)
  • Writing
    • Write an informational/explanatory piece formulated in paragraphs and sections. (W.4.2)
    • Utilize technology to produce and publish writing. (W.4.6)
    • Conduct short research projects that build knowledge about a topic. (W.4.7)
    • Categorize relevant from non-relevant information (W.4.8)
    • Draw evidence from literary or informational text to support analysis, reflection and research in writing (W.4.9)
  • Speaking and Listening
    • Engage effectively in a collaboration discussion. (SL.4.1)
    • Report or recount information in an organized, well-supported manner. (SL.4.4)Speak clearly at an understandable pace. (SL.4.4)
  • Language
    • Order adjectives within sentences according to conventional patterns. (L.4.1d)
    • Form and use prepositional phrases (L.4.1e)
    • Use correct capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing with specified focus on commas and quotation marks to mark direct speech and quotations from a text. (L.4.2)
    • Use a comma before a coordinating conjunction in a compound sentence. (L.4.2)
    • Choose words and ideas to convey ideas precisely. (L.4.3a)
    • Using appropriate conventions when speaking and writing depending on purpose and audience. (L.4.3c)
    • Consult reference materials both print and digital to fine the pronunciation and determine or clarify the precise meaning of key words and phrases. (L.4.4c)
    • Interpret figurative language, including similes and metaphors, in context. Demonstrate understanding of words by relating them to their opposites (antonyms) and to words with similar but not identical meanings (synonyms). (L.4.5ac)
  • Foundational Skills
    • Use knowledge of all letter-sound correspondences, syllabication patterns, and morphology to read unfamiliar multisyllabic words in and out of context. (RF.4.3)
    • Read grade-level text with purpose and understanding (R.4.F4)
    • Read grade-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression. (RF.4.4)

Imaginative Adventures

Knowledge in Action challenges students to understand that people are naturally driven to find answers. Through searching, trial and error, perseverance, and determination new knowledge is gained. This pushes people into action.

Anchor Text

  • Gregor the Overlander by Suzanne Collins
  • Alice in Wonderland by C. S. Lewis
  • The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe by C. S. Lewis

Essential Questions

  • Concept Specific
    • How can one’s character be shaped when confronted by unexpected or incredible circumstances?
    • How is an individual’s character uncovered by their response to major events and challenges presented in incredible adventures and imagination?
    • How is ones’ character revealed by their ability to face and resolve difficulties with resourcefulness?
  • Reading & Responding to Text
    • What is the author saying? What in the text reveals what the author is saying? (RL.4.1, RI.4.1)
    • What is the central idea (main idea)/theme of the text? What details supports this? (RL.4.2, RI.4.2)
    • How does the structure of a text contribute to a readers understanding? (RL.4.5, RI.4.5)
    • What argument is the author presenting? How do readers identify if the evidence supports the argument effectively? (RI.4.8)
    • What is the value of reading multiple texts on the same theme or topic? (RL.4.9)
  • Writing: Opinon & Narrative
    • What makes for a good opinion/argument? How do writers get people to do or think the way the author wants them to think? (W.4.1)
    • What elements should be included that makes a story worth sharing? (W.4.3)
  • Speaking and Listening
    • What are the essentials that make for effective collaborative discussion of ideas? (SL.4.1)
    • What are the essentials that make an effective presentation? (SL4.4)
    • Who is the audience? What is the writer’s purpose? (SL.4.4)
  • Language
    • How do conventions affect the understanding of what is read? (L.4.2adb)
    • How are formal and informal language best utilized and interpreted by audience and purpose? (L.4.3c)