Syllabus

Section 1: 8th Grade Syllabus

*Scroll down to view content-specific portions of the syllabus

Contact Information

&

Conference Times

Science

English

Math

History

Spanish

French

If you would like to schedule a parent meeting with the 8th grade cluster please email Doke,(the 8th grade team leader).

Our weekly conference times are:

  • Tuesdays from 11:15am-11:55pm
  • Thursdays from 11:15am-11:55pm

If you would like to speak to the assistant principal, Mr. Lam, you can reach him at DLAM@houstonisd.org . The school's phone number (713) 917-3565.

Cluster Calendar

All classwork, homework, and test / project dates will be posted on the 8th grade teacher's Google Calendars. Links to the calendar can be found on the main page of this website, www.rogers8.org

Classroom Norms

All students are expected to model proper behavior. Our classroom scholarly code of conduct is as follows:

  1. Be prepared.
  2. Be prompt.
  3. Be on-task.
  4. Follow directions.
  5. Respect yourself, your school, and others.
  6. Be a good digital citizen

Non-adherence to this code will result in conduct cuts. Other intervention strategies include teacher-student conferences, parent contact, and lunch detentions. Please see the T.H. Rogers School Handbook for more information about the conduct cut system.

Google Apps For Education

HISD has created an education account through Google Apps for Education. This is a secure environment where students will be able to complete assignments, turn in work for grading, and participate in group activities through individual accounts that are monitored by the district. Each student is responsible for keeping their login credentials secure because every keystroke they make is recorded within the Google environment. Any online behavior that is against the Rogers' student code of conduct will result in disciplinary action.

Grading Categories

30% Tests/Projects/Essays

30% Classwork

20% Quizzes

20% Homework

Retesting

In order to be eligible for a retest, a student must earn less than a 75 on his/her exam. S/he MUST meet with the teacher to complete the teacher's retest prerequisites before the retest date. The retest date will be scheduled by the teacher within two weeks after the original test day and posted on the 8th Grade Cluster Calendar. A second retest date will not be offered. The maximum grade that a student can earn is a 75.

Tutorial Days

Tutorials are provided after school on Tuesdays and Wednesdays. Please see each teacher's website for more details.

Plagiarism

Plagiarism/copying/cheating (including partial copying) will result in an automatic (and permanent) 0 for the assignment AND an automatic P for the conduct grade for the cycle.

Late Work

Late work will be accepted up to five school days with a 25 point deduction.

After the 5th school day work will not be accepted.


Tardy Policy

Students are expected to be on time to class. The middle school schedule provides a 5-minute passing time between classes. Unexcused tardies will result in a student being assigned to lunch and/or Saturday detention and classroom and office conduct cuts. Students are allowed in the halls after the tardy bell rings only with a Teacher Pass.

  • Tardy 1 - Teacher warning
  • Tardy 2 - 1 day of lunch detention
  • Tardy 3 - 2 days of lunch detention, classroom conduct cut
  • Tardy 4 - Discipline referral to assistant principal; Saturday detention assigned
  • Tardy 5 - Considered a Level II Disciplinary action; office conduct cut
  • Tardy 6 - Mandatory parent conference with administrator; growth plan developed

Absences

If a student is absent the day an assignment/project is due, it must be turned in upon his/her return to class.

It is the student’s responsibility to determine any make-up work assigned on the day(s) s/he was absent. Students are allowed three school days to complete make up assignments. If a student is absent, s/he should check the 8th grade on-line cluster calendar and teacher websites for information about missed assignments, obtain any handouts and see teachers during lunch (signed planner required) or after school with any questions. Remember that is the responsibility of the student to complete any notes/work missed during the period of absence.

Student Support Strategies

Intervention / Tutoring: Students with grades below a 75 (80 in IPC and Algebra I) are encouraged to attend tutorial sessions to ask questions before they turn in work, review content, and prepare for quizzes and tests. Students should see their teachers to schedule after school or lunch tutorials.

Monday: By appointment with teacher

Tuesday: Official day for 8th grade after-school tutorials (3:05-4:00pm)

Wednesday: Official day for 8th grade after-school tutorials (3:05-4:00pm)

Thursday: By appointment with teacher

Section 2: English

“Setting goals is the first step in turning the invisible into the visible.”

Ms. Hendricks, Room 215, lhendri2@houstonisd.org

Planning Times: 3rd and 8th periods

Overview

This course is based on the Laying the Foundation Skills List for 8th grade Pre-AP English, which includes all Close Reading, Grammar, and Composition concepts in the state TEKS and additional concepts aligned to the SAT and both AP English exams: Language and Composition (taken in 11th grade) and Literature and Composition (taken in 12th grade). We will review basic literary and grammatical concepts and move on to more complex concepts such as allusion, appeals, annotation, archetype, concession/ counterargument, direct and indirect characterization, epiphany, euphemism, types of irony, juxtaposition, sentence manipulation, theme, syntax, tone, shift, symbolism, and rhetorical purpose. We will focus on not just correctly identifying devices but on analyzing the effect of these devices and using stylistic imitation to integrate these concepts into our own writing, fostering a culture of thinking.

Course Goals and Learning Outcomes

  1. Develop students’ Habits of Mind and communication skills through reading, writing, and speaking activities and assignments in order to prepare them for success in high school, in college courses, on standardized tests, and in the working world.
  2. Help students develop a deepened understanding of literary devices, thematic ideas and historical issues present in influential literary works.
  3. Challenge students to connect their own personal experiences and ideas with those in literature and to listen to and respect classmates’ diverse experiences and perspectives.


Specific Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, students will have: completed a project demonstrating literary analysis of the hero’s journey; engaged in process piece writing in the composition of a short story; added 300 AP-level words to their vocabulary; written a personal poem; written literary analyses; engaged in performative Shakespearean drama; demonstrated mastery of diverse syntactical patterns; composed expository and persuasive writing pieces.

Social Contract Violations

1. Warning

2. Written Documentation / Conduct Cut

3. Lunch Detention / Parent Contact

4. Office referral

Core Readings

  • One summer novel (Ender’s Game or Watership Down)
  • To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee (fall)
  • Night by Elie Wiesel (winter)
  • Nonfiction speeches and historical research documents related to novels and themes
  • Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury (winter/spring)
  • A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare (spring)

Writing

Writings will include a poem, a fall group project (hero’s journey), a persuasive piece, an expository piece, a short story, major analytical essays and the process pieces leading up to them (e.g., Dialectical Journal, Thesis, Body Paragraphs, Conclusion, Rough Draft, Revised/Edited Draft), and a spring Shakespearean performative project.


Vocabulary

Students will use Vocabulary Workshop to add 300 AP-type words to their vocabulary this year. In order for us to complete all units, students will frequently have vocabulary homework (exercises and/ or review).


Discussion

Active, considerate, evidence-based class discussion is an essential skill for high school and college. We will regularly engage in graded class discussions, adding skills such as volume, eye contact, posture, gestures, Law School (cold call), self-regulated volunteering, tracking, text references, elaboration, concision, precision, and concession/ counterargument to our skills base.

Hall Passes

Classroom instruction time is important. You will not be permitted to leave the classroom during class time except in the case of emergencies.


Required Daily Class Materials

Binder with the following dividers:

  1. – Literary Terms
  2. – Vocabulary
  3. – Current Unit
  4. – Grammar/ Writing
  5. – Prev. Unit Samples
  6. - STAAR
  • Notebook paper throughout or at back
  • Vocabulary Workshop book
  • Black or blue ink pen; pencil
  • Five highlighters (each a different color)
  • Red pen for peer review / self-correcting
  • Composition book

Tutorials

Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 3:05-4:05 p.m.

About Me

I graduated summa cum laude from Texas Christian University with a double major in English and Religion and a minor in Women’s Studies (B.A.). I earned my M.A. in the Teaching of English from Teachers College, Columbia University (NYC). I enjoy studying the intersection between history, culture, literature and the multiform nature of language. I am excited about the partnership with students and family that will make this year successful! Go Rams!

Contact Information

If you have a question or concern, please feel free to e-mail me at lhendri2@houstonisd.org and/or leave a message with the office staff at (713) 917-3565. Also, please check my website, https://sites.google.com/houstonisd.org/english8, regularly for important class information.

Section 3: History

Overview

The history of the United States from the time of colonization through reconstruction is the basic scope of the course. The students will study the geography of the U.S., the colonization of the Americas, the Colonial Period, The Revolutionary War, the writing of the Constitution, Jeffersonian and Jacksonian democracy, the age of Reform, Westward Expansion, the Civil War, and Reconstruction. This course is the first of a two-part curriculum which the students complete in high school.


Course Goals and Learning Outcomes

The course is designed to reinforce skills learned in 6th and 7th grades and to prepare students for high school history and geography courses. Students completing the course will:

  • Master basic concepts in history such as popular sovereignty, separation of powers, the rule of law, and civic virtue.
  • Read and interpret map, charts, graphs, and timelines containing historical data.
  • Analyze and interpret primary and secondary historical sources.
  • Identify, compare and contrast various points of view concerning historical topics.
  • Assume and defend a point of view on an issue.
  • Write logical essays, using historical evidence to support reasoning.
  • Using historical information to synthesize original products, such as speeches, articles, & dialogues.

Section 4: Math - 8th Grade

Overview

Math 8 further broadens students knowledge in algebraic, geometric, and statistical concepts that will strengthen their critical thinking skills. The course will incorporate technology into the classroom, building their proficiency with Google and TI-84 Plus calculators.


Course Goals and Learning Outcomes

This course is designed to prepare students for high school level mathematics. By the end of this course students will:

  • Be able to solve multi-step equations with rational coefficients and constants.
  • Be able to solve literal equations to find simple interest, compound interest, surface area, and volume.
  • Be able to apply Pythagorean Theorem.
  • Be able to model data graphically in a variety of ways both by hand, and by the use of a TI-84 Plus calculator.
  • Be able to identify functions, as well as graph and solve linear equations.
  • Become familiar and more proficient with the use of a TI-84 Plus calculator by creating graphs, tables, and linear regressions with the tool.
  • Be able to create mathematics claims, justify their claims with mathematical evidence, and be able analyze and disprove faulty statements.


Resources

  • Go Math! 8th Grade Textbook
  • Springboard Mathematics Course 3
  • Springboard Algebra 1
  • Pearson Algebra 1 Digital Textbook
  • Study Island
  • Renaissance 360
  • Khan Academy
  • Think Through Math

I pull materials from multiple textbooks and websites. Any materials that students need to access will be on my google classroom. Students will need to be logged in to their HISD school account to access these materials.

Materials

  • Five-subject notebook
  • Pencil & Eraser
  • Notebook Paper
  • Graph Paper

Section 5: Algebra I

Overview

Algebra I focuses on fundamental algebraic skills which fosters critical and abstract thinking. Students will focus on developing the language of algebra, and develop abstract techniques such as the substitution and distribution properties. The course will incorporate technology into the classroom, building their proficiency with Google and TI-84 Plus calculator.

Course Goals and Learning Outcomes

This course is designed to have students understand and apply the fundamentals of Algebra. By the end of the course students will:

  • Be able to solve multistep equations, multistep inequalities, and literal equations.
  • Be able to identify functions based on equations, tables, and graphs as well as be able to predict a function based on its transformation.
  • Be able to model and solve linear equations, as well as convert them between standard form, slope-intercept form, and point-slope form.
  • Be able to predict parallel and perpendicular lines given a line and a point the line does not intersect.
  • Be able to simplify exponential and radical expressions.
  • Be able to add, subtract, multiply, and divide polynomial expressions.
  • Be able to graph and apply quadratic equations as well as find the solutions to quadratic functions.
  • Be able to solve exponential functions, and apply them to growth and decay models.
  • Become familiar and more proficient with the use of a TI-84 Plus calculator by creating graphs, tables, and linear regressions with the tool.
  • Be able to create mathematics claims, justify their claims with mathematical evidence, and be able analyze and disprove faulty statements.

Resources

  • Pearson Algebra I Digital Textbook
  • Springboard Algebra I
  • Study Island
  • Renaissance 360
  • Khan Academy
  • Think Through Math

I pull materials from multiple textbooks and websites. Any materials that students need to access will be on my google classroom. Students will need to be logged in to their HISD school account to access these materials.

Materials

  • Five-subject notebook
  • Pencil & Eraser
  • Notebook Paper
  • Graph Paper

Section 6: Science - 8th Grade

Course Overview

Eighth-grade science is a survey of the natural sciences, including physics, chemistry, astronomy, geology, and biology. The information studied in the eighth-grade year builds on what students have learned in grades six and seven to establish a solid foundation of scientific knowledge for students as they enter high school.

8th Grade Science Content Standards


Course Goals and Learning Outcomes

Students will engage in inquiry-based activities designed to facilitate their mastery of specific science content through participation in authentic scientific practices. Students will refine their ability to design and conduct investigations, analyze results, and communicate findings. Throughout the class, students will gain insight into the nature of how scientific knowledge is generated and develops over time and will practice developing their scientific explanations and critiquing other’s arguments. Students will also be asked to apply their scientific knowledge to solve real-world problems or complex challenges.


The specific topics we will explore this year are listed below:

  • The Structure of Atoms
  • The Periodic Table
  • Chemical Reactions
  • Force and Motion
  • The Earth, Moon & Sun System
  • Stars, Galaxies and the Universe
  • Plate Tectonics
  • Ecosystems


Materials

  • 100 page hardcover composition notebook
  • One folder with pockets (color is determined by class period:
      • A1 - purple
      • A2 - blue
      • A4 - green

Section 7: Science - IPC

Course Overview

IPC is an introductory high-school course exploring fundamental chemistry and physics principles. Students will master basic chemistry and physics concepts and gain a deeper understanding of the application of chemistry, and physics in everyday life.

IPC Science Content Standards


Course Goals and Learning Outcomes

Students will engage in inquiry-based activities designed to facilitate their mastery of specific science content through participation in authentic scientific practices. Students will refine their ability to design and conduct investigations, analyze results, and communicate findings. Throughout the class, students will gain insight into the nature of how scientific knowledge is generated and develops over time and will practice developing their scientific explanations and critiquing other’s arguments. Students will also be asked to apply their scientific knowledge to solve real-world problems or complex challenges.


The specific topics we will explore this year are listed below:

  • Structure and Properties of Matter
  • Atomic Structure and the Periodic Table
  • Chemical Bonds
  • Changes in Matter
  • Force and Motion
  • Work and Energy
  • Electricity and Magnetism
  • Sound and Light


Materials

  • 100 page hardcover composition notebook
  • One folder with pockets (color is determined by class period:
      • B6 - yellow
      • B7 - orange
      • B8 - red

Section 8: Spanish

A. COURSE DESCRIPTION

In this course students develop strong foundations of the Spanish language with proficiency across the five goal areas outlined by the Standards of Foreign Language Learning: Communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities.

1. Communication: Interpersonal, interpretive & presentational communications.

2. Cultures: Relating cultural practices and products to perspectives.

3. Connections: Making connections and acquiring information and diverse perspectives.

4. Comparisons: Language and cultural comparisons.

5. Communities: School & Global communities supporting a lifelong learning.

At the end of the class year, the students must be able to communicate in interpersonal, presentational, and interpretive modes, and so they will have the enough fluency to support their communicative abilities. In addition, the students will be able to research using very important authentic sources in Spanish that will provide them with some diverse cultural perspectives of the Spanish-speaking cultures. They will be also exposed to fictional and non-fictional works including newspapers, magazine articles, short literary works, music, and short stories to support the development of their reading and comprehension abilities in Spanish. They will be encouraged to think critically, and to consider the facts and ethics in the real-world situations, along with conclusions drawn strictly from Language, when making decisions. The students will engage in analytical thinking, reading, writing, and speaking. The students will become acquainted with the characteristics of major non-fiction expressions. The course is conducted 100% in Spanish.

B. GENERAL GOALS

The main goals of the class are to develop students’ habits of mind and enrich their experience of the language through PBL teaching method. The framework for LOTE (Languages Other Than English) focuses on the five areas that develop communication and cross-cultural understanding already mentioned at the beginning of this syllabus.

C. SPECIFIC AREA GOALS

1. Communication: The goal of learning Spanish is to communicate orally or in writing with people who speak the target language. As your child learns the language, he/she will be able to use it in different ways such as listening to a radio broadcast, watching television shows, participating in a conversation with friends, reading an advertisement, asking for specific information, etc.

2. Culture: Learn about, experience, and understand the diverse cultures of the Spanish speaking countries.

3. Connections: Reinforce and expand their knowledge of other subject areas using Spanish.

4. Comparisons: Learn about languages and cultures by comparing their language and culture to those of people who speak Spanish.

5. Communities: Participate in opportunities to use Spanish outside the classroom. Discover choices to use the target language in their community and career choices.

D. SPECIFIC LEARNING OUTCOMES

By the end of this course, students will have completed four projects, demonstrating knowledge and understanding of grammar, vocabulary, structure, syntax, and meaning. They will be able to establish connections between different disciplines, and cultures. For every project they will be engage in the process of writing a final expository paper, and one persuasive. They will as well write personal and business letters, messages, a newspaper article, some clips in Spanish, and several persuasive posters. In each of the projects they will be engaged in some oral presentations, including a performative TV one.

E. CLASS MATERIALS

Students are expected to actively participate in class, maintain a well-organized binder and turn in assignments on time, as well as review lessons at home every day and be prepared for assessment at any time. Daily, students must arrive to class prepared to work, which means they must bring their homework and their class materials to the classroom:

a. Planner every day’s assignments and special notes. (Daily)

b. Spiral notebook for note taking. (Daily)

c. Index cards. (Whenever the teacher asks the student)

d. Black/Blue ink pen, and pencil. (Daily)

e. Red ink pen for peer review and/or self-correcting (Daily)

f. Three highlighters (yellow, green & orange) (Daily)

g. Spanish/English dictionary (Daily)

h. A composition book (As a journal) (Mondays)

i. A white binder with the following dividers (“A” days)

· Syllabus

· Culture

· Grammar & Writing

· Handouts

· NSE Practice

Section 9: French

COURSE CONTENT:

We will continue to learn the French language, cultures and traditions of France and other French-speaking countries. Our goal by the end of this school year, will be to successfully sustain basic communicative tasks, according to ACTFL standards this is defined as achieving an intermediate level of proficiency. You will be able to recognize and correctly apply all regular and many common irregular verbs in the present, near future, and past tenses. You will know how to ask questions, request information and issue commands. You will be able to discuss sports, travel, daily routine, make comparisons, and learn to use resources to take charge of your foreign language learning experience.

Section 10: Chinese