School Nurse

Tracy Gale RN

School Nurse

Happy Summer!

Can you believe the end of the school year is already here? With the arrival of summer, I thought I would leave you with some Summer Safety Tips from the Academy of Pediatrics. Have a safe and healthy summer.

Sun Safety

  • The first, and best, line of defense against the sun is covering up. Wear a hat with a three-inch brim or a bill facing forward, sunglasses (look for sunglasses that block 99-100% of ultraviolet rays), and cotton clothing with a tight weave.
  • Stay in the shade whenever possible, and limit sun exposure during the peak intensity hours - between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.
  • Use a sunscreen with an SPF (sun protection factor) of 15 or greater. Be sure to apply enough sunscreen - about one ounce per sitting for a young adult.
  • Reapply sunscreen every two hours, or after swimming or sweating.

Water Safety

  • Never leave children alone in or near the water even for a moment.
  • Avoid inflatable swimming aids such as "floaties." They are not a substitute for approved life vests and can give children a false sense of security.
  • Children may not be developmentally ready for swim lessons until after their fourth birthday. Swim programs for children under 4 should not be seen as a way to decrease the risk of drowning. Teach older children to swim. Lessons are available to children at the Hartford pools.
  • Whenever infants or toddlers are in or around water, an adult should be within arm's length, providing "touch supervision."

Bike Safety

  • Buy a bike that is the right size, not one your child has to "grow into." Oversized bikes are especially dangerous.
  • Your child needs to wear a helmet on every bike ride, no matter how short or how close to home. Many accidents happen in driveways, on sidewalks, and on bike paths, not just on streets. Children learn best by observing you. Whenever you ride, put on your helmet.
  • When purchasing a helmet, look for a label or sticker that says the helmet meets the CPSC safety standard.
  • A helmet protects your child from serious injury, and should always be worn. And remember, wearing a helmet at all times helps children develop the helmet habit.
  • A helmet should be worn so that it is level on the head, not tipped forwards or backwards. The strap should be securely fastened, and you should not be able to move the helmet in any direction. If needed, the helmet’s sizing pads can help improve the fit.

Bug Safety

  • Don't use scented soaps, perfumes or hair sprays on your child.
  • To remove a visible stinger from skin, gently scrape it off horizontally with a credit card or your fingernail.
  • Combination sunscreen/insect repellent products should be avoided because sunscreen needs to be reapplied every two hours, but the insect repellent should not be reapplied.
  • Insect repellents containing DEET are most effective against ticks and mosquitoes, and can prevent Lyme Disease.
  • DEET should not be used on children under 2 months of age.

See you August 28th!!