Classics (Latin and Greek)

Course Descriptions

Latin IA: Cambridge Latin Course: Unit 1 Students learn basic Latin grammar and vocabulary in order to read simple Latin prose. Students learn the culture and social history of the early Roman Empire through a study of Pompeii.

Latin IB: Cambridge Latin Course: Unit 2 Students continue to learn basic Latin grammar and vocabulary in order to read simple Latin prose. Students learn the culture and social history of the early Roman Empire through a study of Roman Egypt and Roman Britain

Latin I: Cambridge Latin Course: Unit 1 and Unit 2 Students learn basic Latin grammar and vocabulary in order to read simple Latin prose. Students learn the culture and social history of the early Roman Empire through a study of Pompeii, Egypt and Roman Britain.

Latin II: Cambridge Latin Course: Unit 3 Students learn to read increasingly more complex Latin prose through expanded vocabulary and grammar study. Students continue with their study of the culture and social history of Roman Britain and the city of Rome itself.

Latin III: Cambridge Latin Course: Unit 4 Students complete the study of Latin grammar and make the transition to reading real Latin authors, both prose and poetry. Students read selections from the writings of Pliny, Martial, Vergil, Ovid, Catullus, and Tacitus. A significant part of the course is devoted to the study of the cutural and social history of the early Roman Empire.

Latin IV: Readings in Latin Literature: Students complete their transition to authentic Latin prose and poetry. Students begin with selected readings from Caesar’s De bello Gallico, “Invasion of Britain,” selected poems of Catullus, and begin book I of Vergil’s Aeneid.

Latin V: Vergil’s Aeneid: Students do an extensive reading of Vergil’s Aeneid. Students learn to scan epic hexameter, parse vocabulary, and interpret literature. Students will also analyze figurative language and write well organized essays.

Greek I: Athenaze I: Students begin to learn ancient Greek by writing the Greek alphabet, by pronouncing Greek letters, and by building basic vocabulary. Students will make cultural connections through literature. Students will also develop their reading comprehension through reading increasingly complex prose.