Course Offerings


Festival Conference '17 Course Offerings and Descriptions

The complete list of Course Offerings is presented below, and may be downloaded here.

Notes on Registration:

  • Please note that Tracks and Mini-Tracks are sequential offerings and participants are expected to attend all listed sessions. Registrants should take careful note of these courses and not choose other classes which conflict.
  • Classes are scheduled in session blocks appropriate for divisions not in rehearsal. Some classes specifically designed for directors, or especially appropriate for directors to select, are scheduled during Massed rehearsals.
  • Repertoire Reading Courses will offer different packets of repertoire in their first two sessions; the third session will present selections from the first two sessions.
  • Nearly all classes request that participants bring gloves, Massed or divisional repertoire, a music binder and a pencil. While there will be handouts for most classes, a small notebook for jotting notes is also suggested.
  • Some classes may request that registrants bring handbells in a particular range, if possible, and mallets or other instruments.


Workshop Numeric Designations:

  • 100s - Techniques
  • 200s - Solo and ensemble ringing
  • 300s - Theory, analysis, and other study classes
  • 400s - Repertoire
  • 500s - Discussion and lecture classes
  • 600s - Non-bell classes
  • 700s - Bell maintenance
  • 800s - Mini-Tracks (2-session courses)
  • 900s - Tracks (3-session courses)

Course Letter Prefix Designations:

  • D (Director)– Topics especially appropriate for directors and aspiring directors
  • E (Everyone) – Topics appropriate for all ringers and directors
  • B (Bronze) – Used for Bronze Festival Choir
  • C (Coppers) – Used for Coppers and Coppers Plus Festival Choirs

Course # Title

Session Blocks

Instructor

010E Massed Rehearsal 2.1, 2.7, 3.7, 4.4 Carr

011T Tins Rehearsal 2.4, 3.3, 3.6, 4.1 Carr

012C Coppers Rehearsal 2.2, 2.6, 3.5, 4.2 Rollins

013B Bronze Rehearsal 2.3, 3.1, 3.2, 4.3 Rollins

101E Weaving 101 2.2, 2.3 Ruesenberg

This session is a basic introduction to the dance known as weaving. Learn how to move smoothly and effortlessly to play multiple bells. We’ll work through some 3- bell and 4- bell examples. Feel free to bring any music from home or from the conference that you think involves a weaving issue. Be sure to bring a binder, your gloves and your dancing shoes!

102E Advanced Treble Techniques 2.2, 2.3, 3.1 James

How do those treble bell ringers hold all those bells and ring them so fast and clear? Holding two bells in each hand, we will experiment with the various methods of ringing each bell alone, as well as simultaneously. We’ll open the door to four-in-hand, (and perhaps six-in-hand and “The KJ”), and share ideas on how and when to use it.

104E Bass Bell Technique 2.5, 3.5, 4.1 Hartsfield

This session will cover many of the unique aspects of bass bell ringing. We will explore how to make bass ringing seamless and musical. Topics covered will include bass bell runs, musicality, bell changes, techniques, and damping. Participants will learn tips and tricks for bass ringing and participate in hands-on problem solving exercises. Open to beginning and experienced ringers alike, all will come away with some new ideas.

105E Intermediate Weaving (Beyond the Basics) 3.3, 3.5 Berdensey

This class will begin with a review of basic weaving skills and move towards executing proper techniques in order to become successful at weaving handbells. Topics will include the shoulder and table damp, the one bell change, and the center bell pass, all prerequisites in becoming a successful weaver. Participants will be able to “weave” simple melodies by the end of the session.

109E Mallet Musicality 2.2, 3.1, 3.2 Ersson

Handbell composers utilize mallets to create some of the most exciting and energetic passages in modern handbell music, and proper mallet technique allows the musician to bring these passages to life! This intermediate-level class assumes a basic familiarity with mallet technique and will primarily focus on improving musicality and speed through fun yet practical skill-building exercises.

110E Call Change Ringing 2.4, 3.3 James

Change ringing is the art of ringing a series of bells in a number of changes of the original order. “Call Change Ringing” differs from the usual way in that a ringer calls out a change prior to its execution. We will discuss the history of change ringing, and experience the ‘Call Change Ringing”. Please bring gloves.

116E Introduction to Bell Trees 2.5, 3.4, 3.6 R. Cerullo

Bell trees are for EVERYONE! From beginner student to advanced ringer, they can be played by a soloist, a small ensemble, or with a full bell choir. This class covers bell tree setup and technique, where to find music, and creative ways to use bell trees in worship, concerts, and special settings. It also allows hands-on time for participants to try for themselves!

119E Handchimes: Basics to Challenges 2.3, 3.2, 3.7 H. Cerullo

Once we review the basics of good handchimes practices, we will explore how handchimes can be adapted to physical and learning challenges. We will share activities for using handchimes with the hearing impaired, several learning styles, and some physical challenges. Let’s see if we can get handchimes available to people of all abilities.

120E Bell Berserkers 2.4, 3.3, 4.1 Larson

Can’t get enough? Come learn a new piece in a high-energy environment. In one class, you and your cohorts will learn a new piece of music (level 3 or higher), and get it as close to performance-ready perfection as you can, including all the musicality and energy you can muster. Engineered for animated adults and teens. Bring your gloves and a smile. Leave satisfied with a fun piece of music to keep. Each session will prepare a different piece of music.

A sheet music fee of $5 for this course will be charged at the time of registration.

121E Weaving at the Speed of Light 2.2, 2.5 Moore

(offered to those who have mastered basic weaving skills)

Participants in this class will be guided through three, four, five (and more) bell weaving at increasing speeds. This is not for the faint of heart! The session will emphasize body movement, bell placement, hand speed, dynamics, and weaving four-in-hand through a series of fast and fun-filled exercises. Wear sneakers!

122E Help! My Bells Had BABIES!! 2.5, 2.6, 3.4 Dreier

This class is an introduction to treble techniques – adding the 4th and 5th octaves, and/or covering more bells with fewer people. Ringers will learn both shelley and 4-in-hand techniques, not only the “how”, but “when”, “why”, and how to mark.


202E Solo Coaching 2.6 James

(for ringers and observers)

Come with a solo that you are working on (easy, medium, or difficult) and we will make you look and sound better! Please let Karen know what piece you will be playing for this coaching session by May 15 at kjamesbell@aol.com.

311E Managing Performance Anxiety 3.2, 3.4, 4.1 Burke

“Whether you think you can or you can’t…you’re right!” You know the feeling- first you miss a note, then you start to doubt yourself, then you make a mistake, and suddenly the whole piece is falling apart and you can’t wait for it to be over! Let’s figure out some ways to prepare differently, recover with confidence and move on to a strong finish so you can actually ENJOY your performance, and maybe even help those around you do the same!


313E Beginning Conducting 2.3, 3.2 Goodman

(Intended for new or potential conductors)

This session will introduce basic conducting technique and common beat patterns, and will touch on dynamic and tempo changes, cueing, and use of the baton. Please bring gloves, Massed repertoire music, a music binder, and a baton if you have one.

318E What’s the Meter? 2.2, 2.5, 3.2 Berdensey

Do rhythms leave you all “tied” up? This bells-free class will examine simple and compound meters, time signatures, note values, and the benefits of subdividing the beat in order for ringers to perform rhythms more accurately and successfully. We will also explore and perform all the rhythms featured in the FC 2017 music. Come and have fun while learning rhythms. Past participants should remember “Scooby” snacks for Larry!


322E Ring, Dance, Play: An Orff Approach to Choirchimes® 2.3, 3.1, 3.3 Gall

Explore folk songs, and traditional Orff Schulwerk materials with Choirchimes®, movement, singing, and other classroom instruments. Although the materials selected will be geared towards secular, public school settings, suggestions for adapting the materials for sacred settings will be provided. Participants are encouraged to bring a soprano recorder and be prepared to move!

324E Moving to a New Level 2.5, 3.3, 3.6 Rollins

Let’s face it – ringing handbells is addictive! One of the great challenges of ringing is to find ways to improve your skills and the skills of your choir. In this class we will be discussing the concepts that can help us “move our skills/choirs to a new level.” Concepts like directing, practicing with purpose, creating achievable challenges, and preparing mentally to improve. We’ll incorporate some discussion and some ringing. Prepare yourself to move forward!

325E Holistic Approaches to Musicality – 2.6, 3.5, 4.2 Carr

An Overview for Directors and Ringers

Come and learn about physical, cognitive, emotional, spiritual and community approaches to ringing and how understanding these areas can enhance your skills, prepare you for more enjoyable ringing and conducting experiences, and maximize artistry and musicality in performance!

327E Memorize to Bring Your Ringing to a NEW Level 3.5, 3.6, 4.1 James

When? Why? How much? If I memorize small sections or an entire piece, how does that make me a more musically responsible ringer? Can it improve my technique? Will it get me an extra cookie after rehearsal? Here’s a session that will surely answer all these questions and dispel the mysteries and myths of memorizing. Bring Festival repertoire, a music binder, and gloves.

328D Score Prep for Handbell Directors 2.4, 4.2 Strepka

Score Prep for handbell directors addresses the most basic score study skills up through some more advanced techniques in preparing our scores for the first rehearsal. Topics include taking care of your ringers, assignments, deciding how the music should move, preparing asymmetric rhythms, rhythmic consonances and dissonances, researching musical styles, and telling a story even when there’s no text. Excerpts will be given for each point made. We will also examine an entire piece for problems/challenges.

329E Jumpstarting the Battery 2.3, 3.4, 4.1 Whitehead

Ring strong with aural and visual factors beneficial to the ringer and listener. Explore ringing skills’ tools such as multiple bell techniques, malleting tips and damping options which will augment the battery ringer’s skill set, increase your ingenuity and leave bass and treble ringers in awe!

330E Rhythms and Bell Changes and Techniques…Oh, My! 2.2, 2.3, 3.3 Dreier

Bring your Festival music and a pencil, and we’ll talk “problem solving” and “recovery” strategies. Gain useful ideas for the music at hand, as well as what might be encountered at home.

331E Handbell Certification: Music Theory Level I 3.6 Toll

TEST only

The Handbell Musicians of America Certification has been developed as a comprehensive curriculum program designed to address all levels of training and experience with handbell and handchime instruments. For more information on the Certification program go to: http://certification.handbellmusicians.org/

Music theory is one of the courses required for certification. This class offers an option to test out of Theory 1. Please familiarize yourself with all of the topics covered, as well as read over the course outline and syllabus. There will be a written test, ear-training test, and an individual rhythm test. This link thoroughly covers many of the important details about Theory 1. http://certification.handbellmusicians.org/music-theory/.

You do not have to be enrolled in the Certification program to take the class, but you DO have to be enrolled BEFORE taking the class (test) if you want it to count towards Certification. If you have any questions about this class or about Certification, you may contact the instructor, Joy Toll-Chandler (joytoll@hotmail.com)

332E Advanced Rhythms and Mixed Meter 2.4, 2.7, 3.5 Ersson

What happens when you leave the safety of the familiar 4/4 and 3/4 time signatures? The use of advanced rhythms and complex meters is often seen in level 4+ handbell music and can be daunting even to the most seasoned musicians. This class presents a practical and musical approach to mastering polyrhythms and mixed and complex meters using exercises and full scores. Participants are encouraged to bring their own tricky examples for collaborative rhythmic problem solving!

333D Rehearsal Techniques 2.4, 3.2 Nolan

When you leave rehearsal, do you feel you had a rewarding positive experience, or was it a complete waste of your time? This class will not be just talk. It will be a “hands on” rehearsal experience for both ringers and directors. Please bring your binder and gloves.


334E Introduction to Music Theory 2.6, 2.3 Nolan

Other than playing the notes on the page, what do you know about the music in front of you? Have you ever considered how much more musical your experience could be if you understood a little more about music in general? Give me an hour and I promise you a “painless” increased understanding of music theory as it pertains to your ringing experience. Please bring your binder and gloves


401E Repertoire Reading L 1-3 2.5, 2.6, 3.5 Burke

Each of the first two sessions of this repertoire reading workshop will feature a different packet of general Levels 1-3 repertoire. The third session will consist of selections from the first two sessions. Participants should bring gloves and a music binder.

402E Repertoire Reading L 3-4 2.4, 3.3, 3.5 Miller

Each of the first two sessions of this repertoire reading workshop will feature a different packet of general Levels 3-4 repertoire. The third session will consist of selections from the first two sessions. Participants should bring gloves and a music binder.

403E Repertoire Reading L 3+-6 2.6, 3.2, 3.3 Henderson

Each of the first two sessions of this repertoire reading workshop will feature a different packet of general Levels 3+-6 repertoire. The third session will consist of selections from the first two sessions. Participants should bring gloves and a music binder.

404E Repertoire Reading Seasonal 2.4, 2.5, 3.4 Degan

Each of the first two sessions of this repertoire reading workshop will feature a different packet of repertoire appropriate for Advent, Christmas, Lent and Easter. The third session will consist of selections from the first two sessions. Participants should bring gloves and a music binder.

406E Repertoire Reading Concert/Special 2.2, 3.4, 3.6 Nolan

Each of the first two sessions of this repertoire reading workshop will feature a different packet of repertoire selections suitable for concerts or for special use (weddings, patriotic events, etc.). The third session will consist of selections from the first two sessions. Participants should bring gloves and a music binder.

407E Repertoire Reading Three to Six Ringers 2.4, 2.5, 2.6 Lee

Each of the first two sessions of this repertoire reading workshop will feature a different packet of repertoire selections suitable for use in situations where a full group is not available. This includes pieces specifically written for shorthanded situations as well as those that can be assigned in ways that make shorthanded performance possible. The third session will consist of selections from the first two sessions. Participants should bring gloves and a music binder

505E Handbell History/Lore 2.2, 3.6 Degan

Why is Area 1 called “Area 1”? Because it all began right here in New England! As a participant in this Festival/Conference, you are a part of handbell history. Learn about the first festivals, the New England Guild, the evolution to AGEHR and Handbell Musicians of America, and the vision of the handbell pioneers who got us to this place in our history. There’s a fascinating tale behind each picture in the Area 1 archives.

506E Copyright Laws and the Musician 2.5, 3.6 Coulombe

Have you always thought that “copyright” means the right to copy music, and that a “mechanical license” applies to heavy equipment operators? It’s time to understand the correct meaning of these terms, and how they impact each and every handbell choir, including yours; the legal penalties for ignoring or overlooking these laws are substantial. This class will educate you on copyright laws and suggest ways for you to improve the integrity of your music library and performances, avoid litigation, and respect the intellectual property rights of composers and arrangers.

507E Financials and Business Processes 2.3, 3.2 Hartsfield

for Community Ensembles

Community handbell ensembles carry with them a unique set of challenges, one of them being a more complicated business aspect. In this round table we will share ideas regarding the business side of operating a community ensemble. We will talk about forming budgets, fundraising, advertising, and structure. These sessions will be very discussion based, so bring your questions and ideas.

508E Directors Do Too Much; Ringers Should Do More 2.3, 3.5 Moore

What happens when ringers are empowered and enabled to control their own musical destiny? This workshop will present specific rehearsal and performance tools to transfer the role of the director to the ringers, resulting in an increasingly musical and confident handbell ensemble.


509E The Anthropology of Handbells 2.3, 2.6 Strepka

This class is a summary of the findings of a qualitative research study on the musical and non-musical benefits of ringing in an ensemble. Handbell musicians from different parts of the country were asked a series of questions regarding what makes handbells unique. Themes and how they address the National Coalition for Core Arts Standards are discussed. If you’ve ever needed “scientific” data to give to your school administrator or benefactor on the benefits of handbells, this class is for you!

510E Marking Your Music 2.5, 3.3, 3.5 Ruesenberg

Have you ever forgotten to pick up a bell in time for a bell change? Have you ever put a marking on your music that didn’t make sense to you at the next rehearsal? Then this class is for you! We’ll explore ways to make markings in your music that are consistent and concise so that you can easily remember from rehearsal to rehearsal what you are meant to do. Then you can go beyond the notes and make music.

601E Strength Conditioning 2.3, 2.5 Arnold

Bell ringing is a bit like lifting free weights combined with aerobics—it should all happen in tempo, musically, and without damage to bell or ringer! Are you physically prepared for that challenge? Learn the key elements of a personal strength and conditioning program to help you ring more safely and with less fatigue. Or, just come to class for a great workout between ringing sessions.


602E Line Dancing 2.3, 2.6, 3.1, Glockner

3.2, 3.5, 3.6

Line dancing isn’t just for country music lovers!! Come and enjoy a step-by-step introduction to some basic line dances. Have fun and get some exercise while learning all the basic steps. We will do some country and some contemporary dances. Studies show dancing improves brain function, too. Hope to see you there!

605E Introduction to Steel Drum Playing 2.4, 2.6, 3.1, Adams

3.2, 3.4, 3.5

Have you ever had the opportunity to watch steel drums being played? Did you wonder what the technique is to playing them properly and how the pitches can be identified on each drum? This is a fabulous opportunity to gain some knowledge about a unique instrument and have some fun at the same time. You will learn how the drums are built and work, how many drums are in a “set”, and the various techniques for playing them. By the end of the 75-minute session, you will be able to play a tune!

An additional instructional fee of $15 for this class will be charged at the time of registration.

606E Percussion Tips, Tricks and Techniques 3.2, 3.3, 3.6 Hazel

(Non-Bell Percussion Parts)

Ever wonder if you’re really playing that finger cymbal part correctly? Ever struggle to play triangle and wonder if there is a trick to it? Turns out there are lots of easy tidbits of technique information that will let you relax and play all sorts of relatively unfamiliar percussion instruments with confidence. Bring all your percussion questions.

608E Creative Movement for Musicians 2.2, 2.5, 4.1 Gall

Music and movement are intertwined, especially for handbell musicians. Our instrument requires expressive movement to create a musical sound. Participants will explore concepts of weight, time and space, and gain a kinesthetic awareness of musical phrases. Be prepared to have fun and learn how you move will improve your musicianship. Please wear comfortable clothing; bare feet or socks are encouraged.


701E Schulmerich Maintenance 2.6, 3.1 Chamberlin

Get to know your instrument! We’ll disassemble and reassemble a bell so you will know the parts and their function. Learn how to make adjustments and keep your bells and chimes in smooth, effortless working order. Bring problem bells and Melody Chimes to class (along with your bell tool kit) and we’ll work on them.

702E Malmark Maintenance 3.2, 3.3 Moore

You’ll be surprised by how easy it is (five easy steps) to take excellent care of your Malmark handbells! From simple adjustments to more complex parts replacement, Malmark instruments are very ‘user friendly’. Bring tools (if you have them) and a problem bell or Choirchime® with you to class.

703E Schulmerich Advanced Maintenance 3.4 Chamberlin

This hands-on class will be especially useful for those who are the designated “fixers” or equipment managers of their ensembles. During this class you will disassemble, and then properly reassemble a Schulmerich handbell with the guidance and assistance of the instructor. Tips and tricks on disassembly for cleaning or for replacement of broken parts will be provided. Bring a bell (G4-B5 range) and your tool kit.

803E Introduction to Solo Ringing and (a2.2, b2.6) Arnold

Traveling 4-in-hand or (a3.1, b3.4)

This two-session mini-track is designed to cover the basic skills required to ring a solo line with grace and musicality, including smooth bell changes, lateral motion, weaving, passing, traveling 4-in-hand and displacement. It is appropriate for beginners, as well as for experienced solo ringers who wish to refine their technique.

807E African Drumming (a 2.2, b 2.5) Visbaras

or (a 2.3, b 3.3)

Time to get your groove on! This is a hands on, dynamic two-session track introducing you to African rhythms, their history and cultural importance, and giving them life in an ensemble with a variety of percussion instruments, including traditional African drums. Some instruments will be provided but you are encouraged to bring your own or borrowed djembes, congas, bongos, talking drums, sangbas, kenkenis, shakeres, etc. Let’s have some fun!

815E Wicked Cool Intro to Ensemble Ringing (a2.6, b3.5) Visbaras

“I can’t believe four people can make such beautiful music” …” You all seemed to be dancing up there” …” You play THAT MANY bells at once?!” These are only a few of the great comments you’ll receive when you finally decide to grab three friends and begin an ensemble experience that will bring immense satisfaction to you and your audiences. My goal is to take away the trepidation of small ensemble ringing and start you on a road to a wonderful musical place! Bring gloves, an open mind, a willingness to learn and let’s do this!!! You might even have your first song under your belt at the end of the track!!!!

832D It’s All About Techniques (a3.1, b3.6) Moore

“Why do my ringers’ marts sound like a bomb” Why can’t they ring the dynamics in the music? Why do their malleted passages sound like a broken machine?” As directors we too often make assumptions about our ringers’ ability to effectively execute even the most basic ringing techniques musically and safely. This track will explore how and when to teaching techniques in ways that accommodate varying learning styles, and produce musical results, safely.

833E A Different Path to Handbell Programming (a 2.6, b 3.4) Goodman

You can present an enjoyable handbell-focused program without preparing a full-length concert repertoire. The presenter will use the example of a program of Advent lessons, carols and readings to explore concepts of musical theme and form, program pacing, and logistical considerations that apply to a program of any length or type. The class will analyze and critique a sample program using the concepts discussed, and will also consider how a sacred or secular setting may inform repertoire choice and program design. Other means of constructing a full program with a limited repertoire will also be discussed.


903B Bronze Festival Choir (a2.2, b2.5, c3.6) Wallace

Can’t get enough ringing? This Bronze Track Festival Choir is a three-session track opportunity for experienced ringers who want more! The class will rehearse and perform a challenging Level 5 to 6, five-octave composition at the final mini-concert. Attendance at all three sessions is important for musical continuity. This is a great opportunity to get out of your comfort zone and try a new ringing position. Music will be provided at check-in for this three-session advanced ringing workshop. Please bring gloves and a music binder.

A sheet music fee of $5 for this track will be charged at the time of registration.

905C Coppers Plus Festival Choir (a2.4, b3.1, c3.4) Henderson

Want to stretch just a little outside your usual Coppers comfort zone? This Coppers Plus Track Festival Choir is a three-session track opportunity for experienced ringers who can't get enough ringing! The class will rehearse and perform a challenging Level 3+ to 4+, five-octave composition at the final mini-concert. Attendance at all three sessions is important for musical continuity. This is a great opportunity to try a new ringing position. Music will be provided at check-in for this three-session intermediate-plus ringing workshop. Please bring gloves and a music binder.

A sheet music fee of $5 for this track will be charged at the time of registration.


906C Coppers Festival Choir (a2.4, b3.1, c3.4) Berdensey

For Coppers level ringers who want a challenge, this Coppers Track Festival Choir is a three-session track opportunity for less-experienced ringers. The class will rehearse and perform a challenging Level 3 to 4, five-octave composition at the final mini-concert. Attendance at all three sessions is important for musical continuity. This is a great opportunity to try a new ringing position. Music will be provided at check-in for this three-session intermediate ringing workshop. Please bring gloves and a music binder.

A sheet music fee of $5 for this track will be charged at the time of registration.


911E Musicality Through Motion Language (a2.5, b3.3, c3.6) Strepka

Handbell musicianship and artistry are possible at any level using the vocabulary of Movement Theorist Rudolf Laban. In Session (a) of this three-session track, participants will learn Movement Theory vocabulary and discover their own personal movement profiles. Using the movement principles learned in the first session, Session (b) will explore different sounds and visual possibilities for performance, ringing with intentionality of sound, two-dimensional vs. three-dimensional ringing, and stopped techniques. In Session (c) we will see how to use the vocabulary and principles to maximize artistry in a piece of music. Come ready to move!

933E Handbell Musician Certification: (a2.4, b2.5, c3.7 TEST) Chamberlin

Handbell Techniques Level I

The Handbell Musicians of America Certification has been developed as a comprehensive curriculum program designed to address all levels of training and experience with handbell and handchime instruments. For more information on the Certification program go to: http://certification.handbellmusicians.org/

Handbell Techniques is one of the courses required for Certification. It examines basic handbell and handchime ringing and damping techniques, with an emphasis on ergonomic principles and sound production. More details about this specific class may be found at http://certification.handbellmusicians.org/handbell-techniques/

The instruction for this class is offered during Sessions (a) and (b) of this three-session track. You do not have to be enrolled in the Certification program to take the class, but you DO have to be enrolled BEFORE taking the class if you want it to count towards Certification. If you are taking the class for Certification, you will arrange for a 15-minute evaluation time with the instructor to be held during the third session, Session (c), of this track course. If you have any questions about this class or about Certification, you may contact the instructor, Sue Chamberlin at suecham1585@hotmail.com

935E Handbell Musician Certification: (a2.3, b3.1, c3.3 TEST) Toll

Conducting Level 1

The Handbell Musicians of America Certification has been developed as a comprehensive curriculum program designed to address all levels of training and experience with handbell and handchime instruments. For more information on the Certification program go to: http://certification.handbellmusicians.org/

Conducting is one of the courses required for certification. Conducting 1 reviews the basics (please note that this is not an introduction to conducting class) - posture, stance, use of a baton and non-conducting hand gestures, all in common meters. Additional topics include critical listening, score study, and memorization. More details about this specific class may be found at http://certification.handbellmusicians.org/conducting/.

Please note that there are two required scores to bring- as well as a baton. There is also a video submission requirement. Please check the above link for details on both.

The instruction for this class is offered during Sessions (a) and (b) of this three-session track. You do not have to be enrolled in the Certification program to take the class, but you DO have to be enrolled BEFORE taking the class if you want it to count towards Certification. If you are taking the class for Certification, you will arrange for a 10-minute evaluation time with the instructor to be held during the third session, Session (c), of this track course. If you have any questions about this class or about Certification, you may contact the instructor, Joy Toll-Chandler (joytoll@hotmail.com)