Year 10 Global Studies @ GHS

Unit 4

Indigenous People

Focus of Learning

Concept : UNESCO recognises an estimated 370 million indigenous people that live across 90 countries. They represent approximately 5,000 different cultures and speak the world’s estimated 7,000 languages. The World Bank recognises that this 5% accounts for 15% of the extremely poor global population. How can we, in our classroom, critically discuss how and why contemporary globalisation impacts on indigenous peoples?

Conceptual Understanding: Indigenous People have knowledge and skills that help them protect and care for the land they they know so well. Various organisations around the world are coming together to recognise and capture, in innovative ways, this inherent relationship with the land. How can we, in our classroom, understand the connections between globalisation, human rights and indigenous concerns? How can we identify a variety of responses to indigenous concerns and what is our perspective? How can we make a difference?

Unit Overview

Term 4 Week 1

Exploring Perspectives: What does it mean to be Indigenous around the world?

Term 4 Week 2

Considering Decisions: How can an indigenous people impact a community?

Term 4 Week 3

Considering Responses: How can we capture these 'do's and don't's' ?

Term 4 Week 4

Reflecting and Evaluating: How does this make a difference in our perspectives?

Class Calendar

Exploring Values and Perspectives

Term 4 Week 1

Exploring Perspectives: What does it mean to be Indigenous around the world?

Task 1( Do Now): Take a Quiz to see how much you know about the Indigenous Peoples around the world

Task 2: Explore the Global Map of Indigenous people and identify 5 different tribes( in different countries) that you would like to focus on.

Task 3: Name the major countries and colour in the areas where these 5 tribes on the World Map. Add a compass Rose and a Key. Your task is to discover which explorer travelled to that area will be colour coding the journeys. For example Columbus was looking for India but ended up in America. Use the Map provided for details.

Task 4: Please write an introductory paragraph about your perspective of the Indigenous Peoples of the world. Please use the report template provided and make a copy in your folder.

Considering Responses and Decisions

Term 4 Week 2

Considering Responses: How can an indigenous people impact a community?

You are learning intention is to demonstrate an understanding of the connections between globalisation, human rights and indigenous concerns. We will be exploring a few case studies to understand particular issues affecting an indigenous tribe and the solutions that have been found around theses.

Task 1( Do Now): Identify the various tribes on the World Map. Don't worry if you don't get it right away; by the end of the week you will know most of them as your brain begins to recognise the areas.

Task 2: Check out some 'incredible adventures' that are a daily part of the lives of indigenous people. Match the picture to the activity and then create a presentation to show your understanding of the activity.

Considering Responses and Decisions

Term 4 Week 3

Considering Decisions: How can we capture these 'do's and don't's' ?

We are learning to explore what it means to be Indigenous Peoples of the world. Our Learning Objective is to discuss the impact of contemporary globalisation on Indigenous Peoples.

Task 1( Do Now): Please take this short quiz to check your understanding about Indigenous Peoples.

Task 2 (Merit): Please watch the video and read the case study about the creation of the Never Alone game to get an understanding of the Iñupiat culture and history. Please read the two versions of the case study and write a paragraph about why the game was created.

Use the following prompts to frame your paragraph on Google Classroom:

Why did the tribal council choose to make a game?

What is a purpose of the game and how does it use storytelling?

Analyse how the concerns of the indigenous group have been responded to and solved.

Reflecting and Evaluating

Term 4 Week 4

Reflecting and Evaluating: How does this make a difference in our perspectives?

The changing nature of the world has allowed Indigenous Peoples to seek new and innovative ways to make a difference to their communities. Organisations like International funders for Indigenous Peoples, WWF and Forest Peoples Programme believe that it is wise to strategically use media to discover the wisdom of reciprocity and care of the earth that the indigenous people have. Thus recognising that we can build relationships and become aware of their perspectives.

Our Learning intention this week is to capture the essence from two case studies and evaluate how the human rights and perspectives of the group has been affected.

Task 1: Please take this Quiz to test your knowledge of North American Indigenous Peoples.

Task 2 (Achieved & Merit ): Use your notes from the 2 case studies to write a paragraph each about the changes in your perspectives that have taken place.

So What & What Now?

Evaluation & Reflection

Reflecting and Evaluating: How does this make a difference in our perspectives?

The journey of discovering the various perspectives about Indigenous Peoples has exposed the students of the 10CH Global studies class to explore and reflect on their own ideas. Although the unit has been wrapped up now, it has been very thought provoking and allowed the students to 'carry' these ideas forward as they transition into NCEA next year, and traverse their own journeys.

Transitioning from Year 10 to Year 11 @ Grey High

"I Went on a Waka trip with Whenua iti and the school. I enjoyed myself but am really tired. We learnt how to get on with others, we learnt more about maurakau and we overcame the challenges that were thrown at us. Overall it was a good experience and I will definitely do it again next year if I get the opportunity." An indigenous student's response as he navigated the waka journey with Andy England, the principal.

The Selwell Peak Challenge

What started as an inspirational journey has now come to become a tradition. The Selwell peak challenge has become synonymous to the journey the students must traverse as they leave behind the junior school and move onto their senior years. The message below is one shared with the parents so that they also begin to recognise the change that is about to take place and equip their child as they begin to build their individual waka's to navigate the pathways ahead of them.

"We at Grey High, mark the transitioning from Year 10 to 11, with a walk up to Selwell Peak; the challenge of the journey is likened to the NCEA journey that is ahead of them. Although the route is circuitous and a bit steep at times, the view from the top is fantastic and the thrill of making it to the top and achieving something, is a reward in itself."