Ferocious Fighters Caretaker Blog

This blog is the work of our President, Meg Boland. Some articles have been shared in other places, some just live here. Meg has worked alongside Patrick to build Ferocious Fighters and along the way has found that sometimes, being a parent of a kiddo fighting CRPS is a job that cannot be done alone. Toward the end of the 2nd year of Ferocious Fighters we built our caretaker support group on Facebook. If you need support and haven't joined, please consider joining this very active community of parents, fighting all together against CRPS in our kids!

Returning to school is an anxious moment, but kids with CRPS (and their families) have reason to be nervous that go beyond the typical. In order to create a successful and supportive relationship with the new teacher and/or school, be prepared and try to “front-load” with CRPS information . . .

An Introduction to Meg Boland.

I am a special education teacher and in one of my classes I read an article entitled, “Welcome to Holland” about the process of a parent accepting good in the unexpected development of having a child born with a disability. I read the article and I thought, “Yes, that makes sense”. As a special education teacher . . .

Wow. I know you are feeling really overwhelmed right now with this CRPS diagnosis. The flow of information during this visit, this simple visit where a doctor took a quick look at your child, did an exam and announced, “This is CRPS”. This isn’t your first doctor’s office – not your second – probably not the tenth . . .

When people ask me about being a mom in the world of complex chronic medical issues the one thing they don’t seem to expect is the guilt . . .

Having a sick kid is hard. It is hard on the child who doesn’t want to be sick. It is hard on siblings who crave the attention given to a sick sibling or whose normal life is interrupted as parents scramble to find support. It is hard on Dads who have an instinct to protect and fix the problems they encounter and it is hard on Moms who hold things together and care for the whole family and all of the pieces independently . . .