Declaration of Independence Notes

Learning Target: I will explain the meaning of each section of the Declaration.

Learning Target: I will explain the meaning of each section of the Declaration.

  1. Introduction (informs the reader of the main intentions)
  2. Preamble (introductory part of a statute stating the intent of the law)
  3. Indictment of King George III (formal accusation charging the King with multiple crimes)
  4. Denunciation of the British people (formal declaration of condemnation)
  5. Conclusion
  6. The 56 signatures
The Declaration of Independence
  • "The text of the Declaration can be divided into five sections--the introduction, the preamble, the indictment of George III, the denunciation of the British people, and the conclusion" (Stephen E. Lucas 1989).
  • The Declaration of Independence Lesson Plan is broken into these lessons: Contents, Introduction, The Stage Is Set, Events Leading to the Revolution, Growth of New Ideas in Government, Religion, Tolerance, and Slavery, Reading the Declaration, 2nd Continental Congress, Declaration, Introduction, Preamble, Indictment Against King George III, Denunciation of the British people, Conclusion, and Projects.
Declaring Independence: Drafting the Documents

Declaring Independence: Drafting the Documents

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Written in June 1776, including all the changes made later by John Adams, Benjamin Franklin and other members of the committee, and by Congress

Page 1 with minor emendations in the hands of John Adams and Benjamin Franklin
Page 2 with minor emendations in the hands of John Adams and Benjamin Franklin
Page 3 with minor emendations in the hands of John Adams and Benjamin Franklin
Page 4 with minor emendations in the hands of John Adams and Benjamin Franklin
The "Declaration Committee"
The "Declaration Committee," which included Thomas Jefferson of Virginia, Roger Sherman of Connecticut, Benjamin Franklin of Pennsylvania, Robert R. Livingston of New York, and John Adams of Massachusetts, was appointed by Congress on June 11, 1776, to draft a declaration in anticipation of an expected vote in favor of American independence, which occurred on July 2.