Transition

Who we are

An inquiry into the nature of the self; beliefs and values; personal, physical, mental, social and spiritual health; human relationships including families, friends, communities, and cultures; rights and responsibilities; what it means to be human.

Central Idea

All families have personal histories that have commonalities and differences.

Lines of Inquiry

  • Family life in different cultures. (connection)
  • Stories of families and the past can be communicated in different ways. (form)
  • Continuing traditions and family values is important.(change)

Key Concepts

connection, form, change

Where we are in place and time

An inquiry into orientation in place and time; personal histories; homes and journeys; the discoveries, explorations and migrations of humankind; the relationships between and the inter-connectedness of individuals and civilizations, from local and global perspectives.

Central Idea

All families have personal histories that have commonalities and differences.

Lines of Inquiry

  • Family life in different cultures. (connection)
  • Stories of families and the past can be communicated in different ways. (form)
  • Continuing traditions and family values is important.(change)

Key Concepts

connection, form, change

How we express ourselves

An inquiry into the ways in which we discover and express ideas, feelings, nature, culture, beliefs and values; the ways in which we reflect on, extend and enjoy our creativity; our appreciation of the aesthetic.


Central Idea

Living things grow, move and change in different ways.

Lines of Inquiry

  • All living things grow, move and reproduce. (change)
  • Living things, including humans and other animals, have needs which must be met for them to stay alive.(causation)
  • People and animals move in different ways depending on a variety of factors. (function)

Key Concepts

change, causation, function

How the world works

An inquiry into the natural world and its laws; the interaction between the natural world (physical and biological) and human societies; how humans use their understanding of scientific principles; the impact of scientific and technological advances on society and on the environment.


Central Idea

Symbols can be used for communicating ideas, stories and information with others.

Lines of Inquiry

  • The world around us is full of visual language that conveys meaning. (form)
  • Spoken language can be represented visually through letters, symbols and characters. (function)
  • Stories can make us think and imagine different things. (connection)

Key Concepts

function, form, connection


How we organise ourselves

An inquiry into the inter-connectedness of human-made systems and communities; the structure and function of organizations; societal decision-making; economic activities and their impact on humankind and the environment.

Central Idea

Food comes from plants or animals and may be processed to create different products to eat.

Lines of Inquiry

  • Food comes from plants and animals. (connection)
  • Food products go through changes from their original source. (change)
  • Farms are places where food is grown for people to eat. (function)

Key Concepts

connection, change, function


Sharing the planet

An inquiry into rights and responsibilities in the struggle to share finite resources with other people and with other living things; communities and the relationships within and between them; access to equal opportunities; peace and conflict resolution.

Central Idea

Objects are made of materials that are selected for their intended purpose.

Lines of Inquiry

  • Objects are made of different materials. (form)
  • Materials are affected by environmental conditions. (causation)
  • People choose materials to make objects depending on their function. (function)

Key Concepts

form, causation, function