Grade 1-2

Who we are

An inquiry into the nature of the self; beliefs and values; personal, physical, mental, social and spiritual health; human relationships including families, friends, communities, and cultures; rights and responsibilities; what it means to be human.

Central Idea

Relationships can contribute to our own and others well being.

Lines of Inquiry

  • What does it mean to have wellbeing. (Form)
  • How do relationships affect our wellbeing. (function)
  • How do my relationships affect others well being. (responsibility)

Key Concepts

form, function, responsibility


Where we are in place and time

An inquiry into orientation in place and time; personal histories; homes and journeys; the discoveries, explorations and migrations of humankind; the relationships between and the inter-connectedness of individuals and civilizations, from local and global perspectives.

Central Idea

An Individual’s determination can accomplish change to transform a community, a country or the world.

Lines of Inquiry

  • We all can help to create the change that we want to see in the world. (reflection)
  • Leaders of change share similar traits. (Form)
  • Transformations can come in many different forms. (Change)

Key Concepts

change, form, reflection


How we express ourselves

An inquiry into the ways in which we discover and express ideas, feelings, nature, culture, beliefs and values; the ways in which we reflect on, extend and enjoy our creativity; our appreciation of the aesthetic.

Central Idea

Different perspectives of art can lead to different interpretations, understandings and findings.

Lines of Inquiry

  • An artwork can provide a lot of information to it’s audience. (reflection)
  • Art can be told, expressed, recorded and passed on to others in many different ways. (form)
  • Art helps us construct meaning and perspective in stories. (reflection)

Key Concepts

form, perspective, reflection


How the world works

An inquiry into the natural world and its laws; the interaction between the natural world (physical and biological) and human societies; how humans use their understanding of scientific principles; the impact of scientific and technological advances on society and on the environment.

Central Idea

All living things go through a cycle of change in order to renew, maintain and preserve life.

Lines of Inquiry

  • Living things have characteristics in common with each other.(form)
  • New life begins in many ways. (causation)
  • Living things are all connected and all contribute to preservation of life. (connection)

Key Concepts

form, causation, connection

How we organise ourselves

An inquiry into the inter-connectedness of human-made systems and communities; the structure and function of organizations; societal decision-making; economic activities and their impact on humankind and the environment.

Central Idea

People can support communities to meet the needs of their members.

Lines of Inquiry

  • People and organisations need to play different roles to meet a community’s needs. (function)
  • Communities need different buildings, structures and environments to function effectively. (causation)
  • Businesses can play a positive role improving communities. (responsibility)

Key Concepts

responsibility, function, causation

Sharing the planet

An inquiry into rights and responsibilities in the struggle to share finite resources with other people and with other living things; communities and the relationships within and between them; access to equal opportunities; peace and conflict resolution.

Central Idea

Water is essential to all life and is a finite resource.

Lines of Inquiry

  • Water in different forms is essential to support all life. (form)
  • Water undergoes a predictable and continuous cycle of change.(function)
  • People have a responsibility to consider how their actions affect water and thus other people and living things. (responsibility)

Key Concepts

function, form, responsibility