Summer Reading 2020

Novels may be borrowed from public libraries or purchased from area bookstores.

English II Honors

English II Honors students should read one of the titles below and complete the assignment in the Schoology Summer Reading course with course code R4TX-48WJ-PNV6G on or before September 14, 2020.

This assignment will count as a quiz grade for the student.

Choices: Select one.

Animal Farm by George Orwell

George Orwell's classic political satire follows the animals as they stage a rebellion against their master and then find themselves being governed by a ruthless dictator.

Armageddon Summer by Jane Yolen and Bruce Coville

Marina and Jed follow their parents to the top of a remote mountain where Reverend Beelson's cult is awaiting the end of the world. Will Marina and Jed just go along, or will they decide for themselves what life holds for them?

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot

The story of the Lacks family—past and present—is inextricably connected to the dark history of experimentation on African Americans, the birth of bioethics, and the legal battles over whether we control the stuff we are made of.

To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee

Scout Finch is the daughter of southern attorney Atticus Finch during the 1930s. Atticus is defending African-American Tom Robinson on charges of rape during a turbulent time. Scout and her brother Jem have many adventures while they watch their father defend Tom.

English III Honors

English III Honors students should read one of the titles below and complete the assignment in the Schoology Summer Reading course with course code R4TX-48WJ-PNV6G on or before September 14, 2020.

Choices: Select one.

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

Set in the 1840s, this tale follows a mischievous boy named Huckleberry Finn. In an attempt to escape his drunken, abusive father and strict, religious foster mother, Huck takes off on a raft down the Mississippi River. Jim, an African-American man, joins Huck in order to escape his life of slavery. In addition to dealing with sneaky con artists, greedy plots, and bloody family feuds, Huck must also confront his ideas of race and slavery.

Beloved by Toni Morrison

Born a slave, Sethe managed to escape to Ohio. However, nearly two decades later, she is still not free. Her heart is imprisoned by memories of the beautiful old farm where so many hideous things happened. Sethe has been long haunted by the destructive ghost of her nameless baby—a child whose tombstone is engraved with a single word: Beloved. When a mysterious teenage girl named Beloved appears, Sethe’s terrible secret explodes into the present.

The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger

Published in 1951, The Catcher in the Rye tells the story of 16-year-old Holden Caulfield after he has been expelled from prep school. Confused and disillusioned, Holden searches for truth and rails against the “phoniness” of the adult world. With a focus on the loss of innocence and the inability to save everyone, this novel explores the start of adulthood.

The Color Purple by Alice Walker

Set in the deep American South between the wars, The Color Purple tells the story of Celie, a young black girl born into poverty and segregation. Abused repeatedly by the man she calls 'father,' she has two children taken away from her, is separated from her beloved sister Nettie, and is trapped into an ugly marriage. However, everything changes when she meets the glamorous Shug Avery, singer and magic-maker - a woman who has taken charge of her own destiny. Gradually, Celie discovers the power and joy of her own spirit, freeing her from her past and reuniting her with those she loves.

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

Guy Montag is a different type of fireman. Montag’s job is to destroy the most illegal and most dangerous of commodities—the printed book—as well as the houses where books are discovered. Montag never questions his orders or the destruction his actions cause until Clarisse, a mysterious new neighbor, introduces him to a nearly forgotten past where people did not live in fear. Montag begins to question and test everything he has ever known.

Hunt for the Bamboo Rat by Graham Salisbury

Based on a true story, this World War II novel by Scott O’Dell Award winner Graham Salisbury tells how Zenji, 17, is sent from Hawaii to the Philippines to spy on the Japanese. As World War II boils over in the Pacific, Zenji is caught behind enemy lines. But even though his Japanese heritage is his death warrant, it is also his key to outwitting the enemy and finding the strength to face the terrors of battle, the savagery of the jungle, and the unspeakable cruelty of war.

Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane

Taking place during the American Civil War, this story by Stephen Crane focuses on Henry Fleming, a young private of the Union Army. When Henry becomes frightened during a fight on the battlefield, Henry abandons the battle and hides. Overcome with shame, Henry then longs for a wound—a "red badge of courage”—to mend his cowardice.

Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston

A love story full of beauty and wit, this tale is set in the South and is told in the captivating voice of a woman who refuses to live in sorrow, bitterness, fear, or foolish romantic dreams. Instead, a fiercely independent Janie Crawford explores her evolving selfhood through three marriages and a life marked by poverty, trials, and purpose.

Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut

An American classic, Slaughterhouse-Five is one of the world’s great antiwar books. Centering on the infamous firebombing of Dresden, Billy Pilgrim’s odyssey through time reflects the mythic journey of our own fractured lives as we search for meaning in what we fear most.

English IV Honors

English IV Honors students should read at least one of the titles below and complete the assignment in the Schoology Summer Reading course with course code R4TX-48WJ-PNV6G on or before September 14, 2020. You will complete one assignment from the assignment page in full. Be sure you have completed all parts of the assignment. Option 1 will count as extra credit if done in conjunction with another option. If done alone, it will count only for the summer reading grade.

Requirements

· Your project must be typed in 12-point font.

· Your work should have 1-inch margins and should be double spaced.

· Note page numbers where information can be found in the text using correct MLA parenthetical citations.

· Each page should be consecutively numbered using correct MLA pagination.

· Please create a cover page for your assignment listing your name, the author and title of the book you have chosen, and the assignment option number.

Assignments

Option 1

Do something creative to show your understanding of your book; it must reflect characters, key symbols, and events/outcomes. The creative project needs to show off your skills and display a depth of understanding about the book/character/theme, etc. You must also create an itemized chart explaining what you created, why you created it, and how it is appropriate to your novel selection.

Suggestions

· Create a movie trailer

· Create a playlist of songs about the novel with CD cover

· Create a graphic novel or kids’ version of the text

· Write an alternate ending

· Write a Fan Fiction: what is the “to be continued” version – where do these characters go from here?

Option 2

Relate the book to human nature. Identify three truths about human nature and find three events from the text that relate to those truths. In an itemized chart, explain your choices and address why these truths are important in the text. To showcase your analysis, create three original memes that reflect the events and truths from your chart.

Book Choices

Attucks!: Oscar Robertson and the Basketball Team That Awakened a City by Phillip Hoose

The true story of the all-black high school basketball team that broke the color barrier in segregated 1950s Indiana, masterfully told by National Book Award winner Phil Hoose.

By winning the state high school basketball championship in 1955, ten teens from an Indianapolis school meant to be the centerpiece of racially segregated education in the state shattered the myth of their inferiority. Their brilliant coach had fashioned an unbeatable team from a group of boys born in the South and raised in poverty. Anchored by the astonishing Oscar Robertson, a future college and NBA star, the Crispus Attucks Tigers went down in history as the first state champions from Indianapolis and the first all-black team in U.S. history to win a racially open championship tournament—an integration they had forced with their on-court prowess.

The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck

Set during the Great Depression, it brings to life the migration of an Oklahoma Dust Bowl family to California and their hardships as migrant farm workers. A portrait of the conflict between the powerful and the powerless, of one man’s fierce reaction to injustice, and of one woman’s stoical strength, the novel captures the horrors of the Great Depression and probes into the very nature of equality and justice in America.

The Hazel Wood: A Novel by Melissa Albert

Seventeen-year-old Alice and her mother have spent most of Alice’s life on the road, always a step ahead of the uncanny bad luck biting at their heels. But when Alice’s grandmother, the reclusive author of a cult-classic book of pitch-dark fairy tales, dies alone on her estate, the Hazel Wood, Alice learns how bad her luck can really get: her mother is stolen away-by a figure who claims to come from the Hinterland, the cruel supernatural world where her grandmother's stories are set. Alice's only lead is the message her mother left behind: “Stay away from the Hazel Wood.”

Alice has long steered clear of her grandmother’s cultish fans. But now she has no choice but to ally with classmate Ellery Finch, a Hinterland superfan who may have his own reasons for wanting to help her. To retrieve her mother, Alice must venture first to the Hazel Wood, then into the world where her grandmother's tales began―and where she might find out how her own story went so wrong.

The Hound of Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Generations ago, a hound of hell tore out the throat of devilish Hugo Baskerville on the moonlit moor. Poor, accursed Baskerville Hall now has another mysterious death: that of Sir Charles Baskerville. Could the culprit somehow be mixed up with secretive servant Barrymore, history-obsessed Dr. Frankland, butterfly-chasing Stapleton, or Selden, the Notting Hill murderer at large? Someone's been signaling with candles from the mansion's windows. Nor can supernatural forces be ruled out. Can Dr. Watson--left alone by Sherlock Holmes to sleuth in fear for much of the novel--save the next Baskerville, Sir Henry, from the hound's fangs?

English V

English V students should read Gathering Blue by Lois Lowry and complete the assignment in the Schoology Summer Reading course with course code R4TX-48WJ-PNV6G on or before September 14, 2020.

Requirements

· Your project must be typed in 12-point font.

· Your work should have 1-inch margins and should be double spaced.

· Note page numbers where information can be found in the text using correct MLA parenthetical citations.

· Each page should be consecutively numbered using correct MLA pagination.

· Please create a cover page for your assignment listing your name, the author and title of the book you have chosen.

· You will complete one assignment from the assignment page in full. Be sure you have completed all parts of the assignment.

Assignments

You must choose one of the following options to do in conjunction with Gathering Blue by Lois Lowry.

Option 1

Do something creative to show your understanding of your book; it must reflect characters, key symbols, and events/outcomes. The creative project needs to show off your skills and display a depth of understanding about the book/character/theme, etc. You must also create an itemized chart explaining what you created, why you created it, and how it is appropriate to the novel.

Suggestions:

· Create a playlist of songs about the novel with CD cover

· Create a graphic novel or kids’ version of the text

· Write an alternate ending

· Write a FanFiction: what is the “to be continued” version – where do these characters go from here?

Option 2

Relate the book to human nature. Identify three truths about human nature and find three events from the text that relate to those truths. In an itemized chart, explain your choices and address why these truths are important in the text. To showcase your analysis, create three original memes that reflect the events and truths from your chart.