Manifesto

The Correllian Manifesto

The Correllian Manifesto was adopted by the Correllian Council of Elders in 1579 Pisces (1979 AD). In the course of the decades which have since passed the Manifesto has been modified slightly to follow the times and to make its contents more universal, however, with the exception of just a few words, the document is unchanged from its original content.

The Correllian Manifesto

We, the undersigned, hold the following rights to be absolute and unabridgeable:

1) The right to freedom of religion, religious theology, expression and practice.

2) The absolute right of free speech.

3) The right of free association for all people.

4) The right to be treated equally regardless of religion, race, reputation, or other individual distinctions before the law and public.

5) The right to freedom of personal mores, so long as these harm none –that harm is concrete, and does not extend to disagreement with prevailing morals/opinions.

6) The unquestionable and absolute right to freedom of thought and ideas, and the exchange of ideas regardless of any particulars whatsoever.

7) The need for law and the necessity of government. That said, government must not be biased so that some citizens are elevated, others denigrated. That this is especially true in regards to religion and personal belief. That no religion may use the state or law, established for the good of all, to enforce its own beliefs. That neither race, sex, sexual mores, theology, ideology, cultural background, personal reputation, ancestry, or other distinguishing characteristics are in any way excuse for governmental bias towards citizens: neither personal past, family past, or the past actions of ones associates: none of this is reason for the government to judge an individual.

8) The right to freedom of conscience, not under any circumstances to be impinged by the state.

9) The absolute right to freedom of personal mores. That no religious or philosophical point of view has the right to use the state to force others to abandon their own religion or philosophy. That the state must be absolutely impartial in its treatment of religious and philosophical differences among the people, protecting the rights of all, not merely the culturally dominant.

10) That censorship is an aberration not to be tolerated within the bounds of civilized society. That all people are entitled to the free exchange, both public and private, of ideas, whether they conform to the standards of others or not, and that to use law to suppress ideas or the free and proper expression of those ideas, is immoral and unacceptable. That society may have the right to concern itself with the public (i.e.: on the street or public-owned buildings) display of certain extreme materials, but that no one is entitled to interfere with an individuals right to knowledge and experience, free speech and free association, so long as it is a private and consensual individual matter and does no harm to any other.That disagreeing with someone, or provoking doubt or reflection in that one, on matters of religious or theological dispute are not harm and cannot be considered so.

11) That laws regarding the family must not be based solely upon the values of one religion, to the denigration of others –specifically divorce, adoption, attempts to suppress the matriarchal family, attempts to use law to separate or destroy non-Judeo-Christian-Muslim families, the use by the state of child custody as a threat. That the state has no right to separate children from their parents solely because of the parents religious or moral beliefs, and that said practice is immoral, reprehensible, and utterly condemned by the undersigned. That the only reasonable cause to so remove children from their families is concrete abuse –not so - called “abuses” dealing with the above stated religious, moral, or social opinions of the parents.

12) That the individual has the right to choose or refuse medical treatment according to his or her views, opinions, and desires, specifically in pregnancy and terminal illness. That the individual alone knows what is best in such situations and that no second party has any right or reason what so ever to attempt to compel such persons to follow another path, and that persons –specifically medical and legal personnel- who do not respect this right are guilty of extreme disservice and abuse of the concerned individual.

13) That no individual has the right to force his or her views on an unwilling other for any reason or under any circumstance whatsoever. That no religious or political group has any right to do so either. Specifically to use the law or the engines of the state to enforce their view. Particularly regarding religion or personal morality. That to do so is immoral and impious: that each individual has the right to be free from such force. That this tendency alone is the single greatest cause of bloodshed, oppression, and intolerance in all mans history, as well as the greatest cause of cultural decline. That attempts to use law or pressure to force an unwanted view upon another must not be permitted.

14) That all people must be committed to ensuring the freedom of all, rather than trying to force their own view on others.

That all people must commit themselves to the responsible use of the rights and privileges or citizenship, and must not allow them to erode or vanish or be misused unopposed.

15) That to ignore these rights will surely lead to social disintegration, violence, and oppression by the strongest. That to protect and pursue these rights will ensure the future of all and the free and peaceful exchange of ideas and love among divergent groups.

16) That no individual should permit his or her rights and beliefs to be trampled upon, nor the rights and beliefs of others, but should defend these rights and beliefs. That safety lies in darkness, but none should have to seek protection through anonymity or secrecy because he or she seeks to exercise these rights, specifically religious rights. That individuals and families have the right to follow their own beliefs and practices, so long as they harm no one, free from harassment from those who disagree. That people should not have to fear for themselves or their families, nor risk dissolution of their families, because of the intolerance of others in religious, philosophical, or moral matters.

17) That those who seek to thus oppress others must not be allowed to do so unopposed.