cryptospores:

type collection

On this page are included images of holotypes, isotypes and related examples for a number of cryptospore taxa. Latest update: January, 2019

Adinosporus voluminosus Strother 2016

holotype

isotype

isotype

isotype

Rogersville Sh

GW81-292_A3

Bright Angel Sh

GC-9

Bright Angel Sh

CG98-6

isotype

Cryptotetras mordasis Strother, Traverse & Vecoli 2015

isotype

Grododowon orthogonalis Strother 2017

isotype

Nodospora oyleri Strother & Traverse 1979

isotype

Nodospora is not generally used as a taxon name, but in this case the contact thickenings do not delineate the equatorial margin of a proximal/distal wall combination. Instead they represent a quadrate partitioning of a single vesicle. This is apparent because the wall density does not diminish as light travels through the central portion of the specimen. If both proximal and distal walls were present, this portion of the tetrad would appear to darken.

Spissuspora laevigata Strother 2016

isotypes

(scale bar 10 µm)

Spissuspora is pretty small, each spore-body is only about 12 µm in diameter. As with Vidalgea (and unlike Adinosporus) the walls are rigid and quite circular in outline. There is no apparent sculpture. Spissuspora may possess a thin envelope. (Strother, P.K. 2016: Systematics and evolutionary significance of some new cryptospores from the Cambrian of eastern Tennessee, USA. 227, 28–41.)

Tetrahedraletes medinensis Strother & Traverse 1979

holotype (scale bar 10 µm)

Note the size. The holotype is pretty large: 54 to 58 µm in over all diameter. Each spore of the tetrads is 47 to 50 µm in diameter. Sporoderm is very dense, surface is very smooth (laevigate).

more images of Tetrahedraletes

Vidalgea masculata Strother 2016

holotype

(scale bar 10 µm)

isotype

(scale bar 10 µm)

Vidalgea is characterized by thin blotchy walls and sporomorphs which are broadly circular in outline. The holotype is from the Pumpkin Valley Shale (Conasauga Group) eastern Tennessee, and has an age of Cambrian Series 3, stage 5. (Strother, P.K. 2016: Systematics and evolutionary significance of some new cryptospores from the Cambrian of eastern Tennessee, USA. 227, 28–41.)