RISE Up Events

A Call to Action: RISE up for racial justice in SOLS

An initiative sponsored by ASU’s Research for Inclusive STEM Education (RISE) Center focused on enhancing awareness, understanding, and commitment to change higher education to be more inclusive and strive for racial justice in STEM Education.

Mon. Aug 17th, 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM (PT)

Developing an Anti-racist Biology Curriculum

Led by Dr. K. Supriya, ASU

Target audience: instructors

RSVP: http://forms.gle/ZqoBb3LmtVmnutay9

Zoom: https://asu.zoom.us/j/97868473536

Click here to download flyer!

In this workshop, we will discuss the ways in which racism has existed in biology curricula in the past and how it continues to pervade biology curricula today. Together we will imagine what an anti-racist biology curriculum could be and brainstorm practical ways in which we can examine and change our curricula to make progress towards racial justice in our undergraduate biology classrooms. We will also present specific resources that can help instructors teaching evolution, ecology, genetics, and introductory biology.

About the facilitator

Dr. K. Supriya is a post-doctoral research associate in the Biology Education Research lab at Arizona State University where she explores bias in undergraduate biology exams. She received her PhD in Evolutionary Biology at the University of Chicago, where she also worked as a Fellow at the Chicago Center for Teaching and led workshops on inclusive teaching.


Wed. Sept 2nd, 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM (PT)

Student discussion:
"Request for student voices: What have been challenges for students of color over the past 6 months?”

Facilitated by Miranda Bernard, ASU

Target audience: Undergraduate and graduate students of color, SoLS faculty and administrators

Zoom: https://asu.zoom.us/j/95999959270

Please click here to share your thoughts before the discussion

Click here to download flyer!

We will lead an open discussion with undergraduate and graduate students about what have been the challenges and hardships for students of color in the last several months. This will be a safe space for students to share their thoughts and experiences with others. We ask that only students of color attend this session. SoLS directors and members of the SoLS advisory committee for diversity and inclusion will be present at this event to listen to student concerns and demands.

About the facilitator

Miranda, a PhD student at ASU grew up in Maryland and has always loved being outside, particularly in the ocean. She graduated from Princeton University with a bachelor’s degree in Civil and Environmental Engineering and a certificate in Environmental Studies. Her passion for marine sciences initiated during summers spent with her family in Trinidad and Tobago. Seeing leatherback sea turtles nesting and the ecotourism surrounding these events made a lasting impression. She is inspired by the relationships between people and their environment and how each can benefit the other.

Thur. Sept 17th 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM (PT)

Student discussion:
“How to effectively discuss your race/ethnicity on applications”

Speakers: Isaiah Sampson, Samantha Scott, Frankie Guerrero

Target audience: Undergraduate students and graduate students

Zoom: https://asu.zoom.us/j/91839535565

Click here to download flyer!

Three panelists will share their experiences with students on effectively communicating information about their race/ethnicity on applications for graduate school, medical school, and beyond.

About the speaker

Isaiah graduated from the School of Life Sciences at Arizona State University with a Bachelors in Biological Sciences in 2019. Currently, he is a dental student at UCLA. He is involved in a variety of organizations including: Social Media Chair for UCLA American Student Dental Association, Student Liaison for UCLA Student National Dental Association, HIV Education Committee for UCLA American Student Dental Association, and Oral Cancer Education Committee for UCLA American Student Dental Association.

About the speaker

Samantha Scott is currently a 3rd-year graduate student in the Neuroscience Program at Arizona State University. She completed her Masters in Biology at ASU and her undergraduate degree at Randolph-Macon College in Ashland, Virginia.

About the speaker

Frankie Guerrero completed his B.S. in Biomedical Sciences at Arizona State University. He is a first-generation student with the aim of becoming the first medical doctor in his family. He is currently taking a gap year before applying to medical school and working as a research assistant in the Biology Education Research Lab at Arizona State University.

Wed. Sept 30th 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM (PT)

Discussion:
Representation in the field: How to bust assumptions about who does conservation biology and make training more inclusive for People of Color”

Moderated by Dr. Sharon Hall, Professor in the School of Life Sciences at Arizona State University

Speakers: Dr. Michele Clark, Miranda Bernard, Edauri Navarro-Perez, ASU

Target audience: students and instructors

Zoom: https://asu.zoom.us/j/98298863853

Click here to download flyer!

Click here for the full recording!

Click here for the slides that go along with the discussion!

About the moderator

Sharon J. Hall is an ecosystem scientist who explores the ecology of native and managed ecosystems that sustain people and other organisms within the community of life. To achieve these goals, Professor Hall and her research team focus on understanding the ecological feedback between humans and the environment. For example, her team is exploring the biodiversity of cities, as well as people's relationship to plants and wildlife in their home environment. Her team also explores how urban air pollution affects ecosystem health and functioning, and they explore how villages in the developing world cope with rapid environmental change, such as biological species invasions.

About the speaker

Edauri Navarro Pérez, a graduate student at ASU is an ecologist, mostly interested in biogeochemistry of soils with human impacts. In the past, she has worked with tree frogs in Costa Rica, plants and Maya's remnants in Belize, soils and human impacts in Puerto Rico and permafrost in Alaska. Currently, she is starting a PhD in Arizona State University in the Environmental Life Sciences Program. She completed her Bachelors of Environmental Sciences at the University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras Campus.

About the speaker

Miranda, a PhD student at ASU grew up in Maryland and has always loved being outside, particularly in the ocean. She graduated from Princeton University with a bachelor’s degree in Civil and Environmental Engineering and a certificate in Environmental Studies. Her passion for marine sciences initiated during summers spent with her family in Trinidad and Tobago. Seeing leatherback sea turtles nesting and the ecotourism surrounding these events made a lasting impression. She is inspired by the relationships between people and their environment and how each can benefit the other.

About the speaker

Michele, PhD received her M.S. in Ecosystem Science and Management at Texas A&M University and her B.S. in Forest and Rangeland Ecology and Management at the University of Nevada, Reno. She has a passion for addressing the lack of diversity within scientific disciplines. She hopes to engage undergraduate and high school level students in the ecological sciences and contribute to the diversification of this discipline. She pursued her PhD in Environmental Life Science.

Tue. Oct 13th 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM (PT)

Seminar: “Cultural Lens Approach To Online Teaching and Learning: Small Manageable Strategies & Big Returns”

Presented by Courtney Plotts, Author of the Cultural Canyons and The Space Between Series and Professor

Target audience: students and instructors

Zoom: https://asu.zoom.us/j/99219860373

Click here to download flyer!

In this webinar, we will join Courtney Plotts, Ph.D. presenting on small changes to your online course that can make a big difference for you and your students. In this interactive session, participants will partner with peers to learn about small changes within a cultural lens that make big differences in your online classroom. Questions like “Do you feel disconnected in online spaces?” “Do you feel like it is difficult to connect with your students in online spaces and create community?” will be addressed.

About the presenter

Dr. Plotts is the National Chair of the Council For At-Risk Student Education and Professional Standards, the country’s only organization that provides standards for working with marginalized and nontraditional students in Kindergarten to College. Her role as National Chair includes training, consulting, and research.

Her subject matter expertise has been used in a variety of book publications. Most recently “Small Teaching Online” By Flower Darby with James M. Lang published in June 2019.


Wed. Oct 14th 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM (PT)

Workshop: “Past, Present, and Imagining the Future: (Re) purposing STEM Research, Curriculum, Pedagogy”

Facilitated by Dr. Tara Nkrumah & Dr. K. Supriya, ASU

Target audience: students and instructors

Zoom: https://asu.zoom.us/j/91921840966

Click here to download flyer!

Click here for the full recording!

In this workshop, participants will critically assess STEM research practices, curriculum, and pedagogy and think about how these are intertwined with the society we live in and therefore shaped by the legacies of colonialism, imperialism, and racism. We will focus on critical media literacy as a tool to (re)purposing our research, curriculum, and pedagogical practices. Through our discussions, we will develop ways in which we can all make progress towards social justice in our research labs and classrooms.

About the facilitator

Dr. Tara Nkrumah is a Postdoctoral Research Associate at Arizona State University. Through her research agenda centering culture, equity, and engagement in science curriculum development, Tara explores culturally responsive leadership to increase the underrepresentation of Black girls and women in STEM education and careers.

About the facilitator

Dr. K. Supriya is a post-doctoral research associate in the Biology Education Research lab at Arizona State University where she explores bias in undergraduate biology exams. She received her PhD in Evolutionary Biology at the University of Chicago, where she also worked as a Fellow at the Chicago Center for Teaching and led workshops on inclusive teaching.


Fri. Oct 30th 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM (PT)

Seminar:
Why underrepresented minority students are leaving undergraduate research experiences"

Presented by Dr. Katelyn Cooper, Assistant Professor in the School of Life Sciences, ASU and Cindy Vargas, Ph.D. student in Biology, ASU

Target audience: instructors

Zoom: https://asu.zoom.us/j/91476962050

Click here to download flyer!

Click here for the full recording!

The majority of the literature focused on undergraduate research experiences (UREs) highlights the many benefits of participating in research but ignores potential challenges that undergraduate researchers face. We will present two studies that highlight challenges that students experience in UREs and examine whether there are differences in the experiences of students of different racial and ethnic backgrounds. In a study of 768 life sciences majors across 25 research-intensive institutions, we found that 50% of undergraduates consider leaving their UREs and 25% actually leave. While underrepresented racial minority students (URM) leave at the same rate as white and Asian students, they are disproportionately likely to leave because they do not feel as though they are gaining skills and knowledge. Further, in a study of 1272 life sciences majors across 87 colleges and universities, even though on average URM students describe their research as less difficult than white students, they reported higher levels of research anxiety, which negatively predicted students’ intentions to persist in science research careers. URM students were 3.5x more likely than white student to report that the lab environment negatively affected their research anxiety. Taken together these studies highlight how different students’ UREs can be and evoke a number of questions that require further exploration: Are URM students tasked with less difficult research assignments which yield fewer gains than white students? What about the lab environments causes disproportionately high anxiety for URM students? What can mentors do to lessen the unique research challenges faced by URM students?

About the presenter

Dr. Cooper is an assistant professor in the School of Life Sciences at ASU. She is a biology education researcher and investigates ways to create a more diverse and inclusive undergraduate biology community. She is particularly interested in how student mental health affects their experiences in active learning classrooms and in undergraduate research. She also studies the impact of biology education course-based undergraduate research experiences on students.




About the presenter

Cindy Vargas is a first-generation Environmental Life Sciences PhD student at Arizona State University. She is a marine conservation researcher focusing on small-scale fisheries and bycatch mitigation. After graduate school, she intends to teach biology courses at the community college level.

Mon. Nov 23rd 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM (MT)

Student discussion: “Request for student voices re-visited: What have been challenges for students of color over the past 6 months?”

Facilitated by Frankie Guerrero, ASU

Target audience: undergraduate and graduate students of color, SoLS faculty and administrators

Zoom: https://asu.zoom.us/j/92045647814

Click here to download flyer!

In this open student discussion, undergraduate and graduate students of color will have a chance to talk about what have been the challenges and hardships in the last several months. This will be a safe space for students to share their thoughts and experiences with others. We ask that only students of color attend this session. SoLS directors and members of the SoLS advisory committee for diversity and inclusion will be present at this event to listen to student concerns and demands.

About the facilitator

About the facilitator: Frankie Guerrero, from Long Beach, CA is a research assistant in the Biology Education Research Lab at Arizona State University who studies the experiences of students with disabilities in college science classrooms. He completed his B.S. in Biomedical Sciences here at Arizona State University. He is a first-generation student with the aim of becoming the first medical doctor in his family.






Tue. Dec 8th 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM (MT)

Workshop: Frameworks for evaluating inclusive course design

Facilitated by Amy Pate and Josh Caulkins, ASU

Target audience: instructors

Zoom: https://asu.zoom.us/j/99219860373

Click here to download flyer!

This interactive session will showcase ways for faculty to examine and review their own or other's course materials for elements that promote equity and inclusion. Participants will practice evaluating course content and activities for these elements. This will enable and empower instructors to think more critically about equity and inclusion in the development of their courses.




About the facilitator

Amy is the Assistant Director of Faculty Support, for the School of Life Sciences (SoLS). Her responsibilities include managing the Teaching Innovation Center (TIC), a "makerspace" for faculty and instructors to learn, share and collaborate with innovative technologies for their face-to-face, hybrid, and fully online classes. Amy's team develops training and workshops that help faculty integrate “best practices” for implementing active learning in their courses. She is currently teaching EDT180 for Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College.

Most recently Amy has been involved with the use of virtual reality for online lab classes, and developing the new online biology degree. Amy’s graduate work included studies in elearning, adult learning and faculty development in higher education. Her thesis focused on specialized training to prepare adjunct college professors to be effective in their classrooms.





About the facilitator

Joshua Caulkins is the Assistant Director for Undergraduate Programs within the School of Life Sciences (SOLS) where he serves as the director of the BioSpine Initiative, a project aimed at ensuring effective instruction and student learning within the department. Joshua is a faculty developer with expertise in STEM-focused course and curriculum design, program assessment, and evidence-based teaching practices.

Before coming to ASU, Joshua was the Assistant Director for Faculty Development in the Center for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning at the University of Rhode Island (URI), where he directed all efforts towards instructional reform within STEM departments and programs. Prior to his time at URI, Joshua spent three years working with the Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, primarily working on course enhancements with faculty and on the implementation of evidence-based teaching practices.