MOLAA

Museum of Latin American Art | Long Beach, CA

Visit MOLAA!

Address: 628 Alamitos Avenue, Long Beach, CA 90802 | Website: MOLAA.org | Phone: (562) 437 - 1689

Hours: Monday & Tuesday: Closed | Wednesday, Thursday, Saturday & Sunday: 11am - 5pm | Friday: 11am - 9pm | MoLAA is closed on major holidays, including 4th of July, Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and New Years Day.

Admission: General Admission $10.00 | Seniors $ 7.00 | Students $ 7.00 | MOLAA Members & Children under 12 years are free. | Free admission every Sunday.

Free Admission the fourth Friday of every month between 5:00-9:00 p.m.

Parking: Free onsite parking. Parking is on a first-come, first-serve basis. Download Map Point-to-Point Driving Directions (PDF)

Public Transit: The Metro Blue Line connects Los Angeles to Long Beach. Exit 5th St. Station at 598 N. Long Beach Blvd. Long Beach, 90802. From the train platform, take 6th street east to Alamitos. Arrive at the Museum, located between 6th and 7th street at 628 Alamitos Ave, Long Beach, 90802. For your best route, use Metro’s Trip Planner.

Go Metro and receive 2-for-1 admission at MoLAA! For more information, click here.

Schedule a Tour!

  • Guided Tours: Trained MOLAA docents guide visitors through our galleries, viewing a selected number of artworks and engaging the visitor in thoughtful discussions about them, allowing the visitor to actively see the work in a fresh way. All tours must be booked at least 2 weeks in advance.
      • Available: Wednesday through Saturday beginning at 10AM
      • Fees: $6 per visitor (self-guided tours must register online to receive discounted group rate)
      • Duration: 60 minutes
      • Maximum Capacity: 45 visitors

Please complete a Tour Registration Form for guided and self-guided tours.

  • Self-guided Tours: Receive a discounted group rate when you book your self-guided visit of ten or more using the online registration form. Groups who book online also receive supplemental educational materials to enrich their visit.
      • Available: Wednesday through Saturday beginning at 10AM
      • Fees: $6 per visitor (self-guided tours must register online to receive discounted group rate)
      • Duration: 60 minutes
      • Maximum Capacity: 45 visitors

Please complete a Tour Registration Form for guided and self-guided tours.

  • Guided Tour & Workshop: Enjoy a guided tour of the galleries by trained MOLAA docents followed by an art workshop led by a MOLAA Teaching Artist. Visitors view a selected number of works during a tour, learning to look actively and engaging in a discussion about the art. During the workshop, participants create their own work of art related to the topics presented during the tour. Tours & workshops are appropriate for visitors of all ages. Activities and lessons presented by docents and teaching artists reinforce Common Core as well as California visual arts content standards. Tours and workshops must be booked at least 2 weeks in advance.
      • Available: Wednesday through Saturday beginning at 10AM
      • Fees: $8 per visitor
      • Duration: 120 minutes
      • Maximum Capacity: 60 visitors

Please complete a Tour Registration Form for guided and self-guided tours.

Follow us!

Facebook: /MuseumofLatinAmericanArt | Instagram: @MOLAAart | Twitter: @MOLAA

#PSTLALA | #MOLAA

About MOLAA

The Museum of Latin American Art (MOLAA) was founded in 1996 in Long Beach, California and serves the greater Los Angeles area. MOLAA is the only museum in the United States dedicated to modern and contemporary Latin American art. Since its inception, MOLAA has doubled its size, added a 15,000 sq. ft. sculpture garden and expanded its permanent collection, ranging from works by Tamayo and Matta to Cruz-Diez, Los Carpinteros and Tunga.

The museum is located in the city’s rapidly developing East Village Arts District. Between 1913 and 1918 the site that the museum now occupies was the home of the Balboa Amusement Producing Company, then the World’s most productive and innovative silent film studio. Before there was a Hollywood, Balboa was the king of the silver screen, producing as much as 20,000 feet of negative film a week.

The building that was renovated as MOLAA’s Entertainment / Education / Special Event venue may have been part of the old Balboa film studio. MOLAA’s exhibition galleries, administrative offices and store are housed in what was once a roller skating rink known as the Hippodrome. Built in the late 1920s, after the film studios were gone, the Hippodrome was a haven for skaters for four decades. The building then served as a senior health center for fifteen years. The high vaulted ceilings and beautiful wooden floors were perfectly suited for the Hippodrome's final metamorphosis into the Museum of Latin American Art.