House System

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We are very passionate about our competition based house system. The aim is to build teamwork, confidence and community through competition. There are four houses: Johnson, Wilberforce, Sullivan and Reckitt. Every student is a member of one of the houses and competes to earn points for their house. Students can earn points for things such as attendance, progress, photography, sport, poetry, chess etc. You name it, we’ve got a competition to enable everyone to get involved. We want every student to develop the character, grit and determination to enable them to compete and experience what it feels like to be part of a successful team as well as getting first hand experiences of team camaraderie and team spirit.

Wilberforce House

William Wilberforce was born on 24 August 1759 in Hull, the son of a wealthy merchant. He studied at Cambridge University where he began a lasting friendship with the future Prime Minister, William Pitt the Younger. In 1780, Wilberforce became Member of Parliament for Hull, later representing Yorkshire. His Christian faith prompted him to become interested in social reform, particularly the improvement of factory conditions in Britain. The abolitionist Thomas Clarkson had an enormous influence on Wilberforce. He and others were campaigning for an end to the trade in which British ships were carrying black slaves from Africa, in terrible conditions, to the West Indies as goods to be bought and sold. Wilberforce was persuaded to lobby for the abolition of the slave trade and for 18 years he regularly introduced anti-slavery motions in parliament. The campaign was supported by many members of the Clapham Sect and other abolitionists who raised public awareness of their cause with pamphlets, books, rallies and petitions. In 1807, the slave trade was finally abolished, but this did not free those who were already slaves. It was not until 1833 that an act was passed giving freedom to all slaves in the British empire. Wilberforce's other efforts to 'renew society' included the organisation of the Society for the Suppression of Vice in 1802. He worked with the reformer, Hannah More, in the Association for the Better Observance of Sunday. Its goal was to provide all children with regular education in reading, personal hygiene and religion. He was closely involved with the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. He was also instrumental in encouraging Christian missionaries to go to India. Wilberforce retired from politics in 1825 and died on 29 July 1833, shortly after the act to free slaves in the British empire passed through the House of Commons. He was buried near his friend Pitt in Westminster Abbey.

Head of Wilberforce - Mr Ellwood

As House Leader of Wilberforce, I am passionate about the competition and the thrill that it gives students and staff when they take part in house events.

I am a former PE Teacher of the Academy and this aspect of my career has given me a strong desire to compete and succeed as an individual or within a team. As well as House Leader, I am now Head of Computing at Kingswood Academy, where on a daily basis I help to develop strong morale and excellent social skills to aid students in achieving their potential.

Wilberforce House aims to be the best; to provide extensive opportunities for students to achieve and develop as individuals. We firmly believe that teamwork helps promote confidence and develop individual attributes in our students. Our house values, ‘Dedication, Everyone is Valued, Respect and No excuses’ really resonates with me as I strongly believe that one of my key roles as a House Leader is to instil in the pupils and staff a determination to succeed in all they do. We celebrate the achievements through our House and are keen to maximise the participation throughout events and competitions in the school.

Looking at the year ahead, we as a house fundamentally believe that with the true grit and enthusiasm of the students, that we can become House Champions. We realise that achievement comes in many different ways, whether that is coming to win or simply taking part. However, we are committed to making sure that every student in Wilberforce House has every opportunity to grow in confidence and make the most of their potential, whilst at the same time earning valuable points for the house and flourishing into successful adults of the future.


Mr O Ellwood

Reckitt House

Sir James Reckitt (1833 - 1924) entered the family starch-making business in Hull in 1848 as a junior clerk. He became a partner and served as Chairman of Reckitt & Sons Ltd. and helped guide it into becoming a major manufacturer of many well-known household products. James Reckitt, the youngest son of Isaac is best known in Hull through his legacy of charitable causes and gifts to the people of the city. He had a very strong social conscience and devoted much of his time, energy and if necessary personal capital to improving quality of life for the residents of Hull. He headed the campaign for free provision of public libraries in Hull and when the local authorities failed to provide one he financed the purchase of one himself on Holderness Road in Hull. He assisted in setting up Hull's Royal Infirmary and was a chairman from 1900 until his death in 1924. In 1894, he was offered and reluctantly accepted a Baronetcy. James Reckitt's most substantial gift to his workers was the creation of Garden Village. He provided £100,000 for the provision of 600 purpose built houses with gardens located close to the factories. The idea was to provide healthy and comfortable domestic arrangements in a village-like community. The provision of space, a village hall for religious services and public events and garden areas were considered to provide health and happiness for his workers, which would naturally make them more content and therefore productive. They were also provided at much lower cost than less adequate housing without garden space in the rest of the city.

Head of Reckitt - Mr Rouse

As house leader of Reckitt, I feel really proud, excited and nervous. I am proud and excited because of the great set of students and staff within Reckitt. Everyone is willing to go the extra mile to ensure we keep at the top of the leader board. I am nervous as we have won it the past two years and it is my responsibility to ensure we do not give the other houses any chance of taking our title.

The house means a lot to me as James Reckitt was a superb philanthropist who put everybody before himself. I want to mirror his selfless attitude this through to our students which they can carry with them, beyond school.

I relate to the 4 core values of Reckitt House through various things I have done and experienced within my life. I believe in doing community work at any given chance whether that be at home or away. I have done various projects from working with young adults and mental charities within hull to participating in local community work in Egypt. I have always tried to be the hardest working person possible, as I believe this is a positive attitude to have which reflects on myself. Like the famous saying goes, 'Hard work beats talent, when talent does not work hard'. Generosity is key in any walk of life. Generosity brings happiness within a person through seeing the reactions of people we can be generous towards. Generosity has the potential to bring happiness to people around the world.

My vision for Reckitt is to simply be the best by demonstrating at least one of the values every day, whether it be in lessons, out of school or at home. I believe by embedding these values in the Reckitt students, this will help with their personal development as well as learning potential through life. My ethos for the house is through hard work, support and team work we can keep Reckitt at the top of the leader board.


Mr D Rouse

Johnson House

Britain’s most famous aviatrix, Amy Johnson, was born 1 July 1903, in Hull, Yorkshire where she lived until she went to Sheffield University in 1923 to complete a BA in Economics. Following graduation, she moved to London, working as a secretary to a solicitor where she also became interested in flying. Her flying career began at the London Aeroplane Club in the winter of 1928-29 and her hobby soon became an all-consuming determination to prove that women could be as competent as men in an otherwise male dominated field. Her first important achievement, after flying solo, was to qualify as the first British-trained woman ground engineer, the only woman in the world to do so at that time. Early in 1930, she set her objective to fly solo to Australia and to beat Bert Hinkler's record of 16 days. Amy set off alone from Croydon on 5 May 1930, and landed in Darwin on 24 May, a flight distance of 11,000 miles. She was the first woman to fly alone to Australia and came home to the UK to a hero’s welcome which culminated in her award of a C.B.E. In July 1931, she set an England to Japan record in a Puss Moth with Jack Humphreys, followed in July 1932 with a solo flight from England to Cape Town. In May 1936, she set a record from England to Cape Town, solo, in a Percival Gull, a flight to retrieve her 1932 record. After her commercial flying ended with the outbreak of the Second World War in 1939, Amy joined the Air Transport Auxiliary, a pool of experienced pilots who were ineligible for RAF service. Her flying duties consisted of ferrying aircraft from factory airstrips to RAF bases. It was on one of these routine flights on 5 January 1941, that Amy crashed into the Thames estuary and was drowned; her body was never recovered. During her lifetime, Amy was recognised many times. She was the guest of honour at the opening of the first Butlins’ holiday camp in Skegness in 1936. Amy was also the president of the Women's Engineering Society between 1935 and 1937.

Head of Johnson - Miss Styche

As the Johnson leader, I feel really proud, excited and enthusiastic to be a part of a great set of students and staff who are keen to ensure we stay at the top of the leader board so we don’t fall behind. As a keen sportswomen and PE teacher, Johnson house for me is named in honour of Amy Johnson. Amy was an ambitious, brave individual who was the first pilot to fly solo from Britain to Australia.

Johnson represents four key values that presented through various competitions and is embedded within my life experiences. I carry these values at all times, Ambition, Courage, Independence and Pioneering’. I firmly believe that competitiveness can help to promote growth within a young individual, not only just commitment but to work as a solid team from start to finish. Through my life experiences, I have always had the courage to be very competitive but also a very independent individual who likes to try new challenges. My famous saying is ‘Start Unknown, Finish Unforgettable’. Therefore, working as hard as you possibly can will change a person’s mind set to a positive attitude. With this in mind, the Johnson team go that extra mile in competitions that withhold each and every one of these values for pupils to go above and beyond in their school life.

My ethos for the house is through my committed, hard-working, supportive, bubbly sense of humour and ambitious team work ethic that keeps Johnson going. However, I want to help nurture the whole house through upholding the academy’s expectations that every student will succeed to be outstanding through progress in their time with the academy. My main aim for the next year ahead is for every student within the House to compete in at least 2 box entries and 5 Friday competitions every half a term.

My vision for Johnson is to demonstrate to the pupils each and every one of these key values at all times. For pupils to look up to me as their role model to succeed, not only in house competitions but as an independent individual overall that brings independence and the courage to drive forward.

Johnson truly underpins each and every one of these values that is represented by my key roles as a House Leader. So step aside, Johnson are ready to take that winning cup of 2019!

Miss S Styche

Sullivan House

Clive A.Sullivan MBE (born 9 April 1943 in Cardiff, died 8 October 1985 in Hull) was a Welsh rugby union and professional Rugby League World Cup winning footballer of the 1960s, 70s and 80s. A Great Britain and Wales international winger, he played with both Hull and Hull Kingston Rovers in his career. He was the first black captain of the Great Britain Lions and for any national British sporting side. In his debut for Hull, Sullivan had an outstanding game and gained the support of the Hull club and city. He played a total of 352 games for Hull, scoring 250 tries. In his 213 games for Hull K.R. he scored 118 tries. His international career took him to great heights having made his debut for Great Britain in 1967. The following year he played three World Cup matches, grabbing a hat-trick against New Zealand. In 1969, he toured Australasia, but only participated in one game due to injury. He however won a further three test caps against New Zealand in 1971. In 1972 he was handed the captaincy of Great Britain and played two tests against France. The World Cup took place that same year, and he captained Great Britain to become world champions. He scored a try in each of Great Britain’s four games. Sullivan scored possibly the most famous try in the history of the World Cup to level 10-10 against Australia in the final, after a length of the field run. The 1975 Rugby League World Cup saw Sullivan lead Wales in all four matches, scoring a try in the defeat of England in the second game for the Welsh team. Wales ended up finishing 3rd in the five-team World Cup. Sullivan was unexpectedly called back into the Hull FC team in 1982 after a period on the coaching staff. At the age of 39 he played in the Challenge Cup Final replay at Elland Road which Hull won against Widnes. When Sullivan died of cancer in 1985 aged just 42, the city of Hull held him in such high regard that a section of the city’s main approach road (the A63) between the Humber Bridge and the city centre was renamed Clive Sullivan Way in his honour.

Head of Sullivan - Mr Davis

I am very excited and honoured to be the new Leader of Sullivan house. I want to make sure that all our students get the same thrill that I do from competing, not just as an individual, but as a team. I feel through this, they will become outstanding young people.

As a keen sportsman, Sullivan house has significance for me as it is named in honour of Clive Sullivan. Clive Sullivan was a Rugby League player. He played for both Hull Kingston Rovers and Hull FC. During his playing career he was also capped for Great Britain, a side he went onto captain. By doing so he became the first black person to captain a British national sports team. When Clive passed away he meant so much to the city of Hull that the A63 road is named in his honour.

Sullivan house’s four key values are ones I carry with me at all times, Determination, Resilience, Personal Drive and Modesty. Throughout my own life, I have faced challenges both in and out of my working environment that have required me to build resilience and keep my determination to succeed, and this experience is one I can pass on and will do my best to use to guide Sullivan house. Through these values, I want to enable our students to become superb role models not just during school life but into their future careers.

In Sullivan house, we uphold the Academy’s expectations that students will make outstanding academic progress in their time with us. However, I want to help nurture the whole person for each student in the house, of which, grades are only a part. It is my hope that students will leave Sullivan house being well-rounded individuals who can talk with anyone, respect everyone and have only positive things to say about themselves.

My aspiration for Sullivan house is that everyone in there is able to succeed in whatever makes them happy. Just like our namesake, we will be strong against adversity and will prevail where there are barriers in our way. We will celebrate every individual achievement as those build together to allow us to triumph as a whole house.

Mr A Davis