World History & Geography

with Ms. Seki and Mr. Dunbar

www.bit.ly/debatehistory

| Course Syllabus | Online Textbook | link to old website |

4.20.2018 (Fri)

**Socratic Seminar Day**

"Who were the winners and losers of the Industrial Revolution?"

"Which economic system would have helped more people through the Industrial Revolution, capitalism or socialism?

Performance Tasks

  • Analyze how the Industrial Revolution drove change on a global, social, and individual scale
  • Evaluate the extent to which the Industrial Revolution was a force fir the common good

Key Concepts

  • All Industrial Revolution Concepts

Featured Sources

  • All sources from the I.R. Unit


4.19.2018 (Thursday) -- Writing Center Day -- (no Challenge Questions today)

Performance Tasks:

  • TASK 1: (Planning)
    • Complete both evidence flowcharts on the two Socratic Seminar questions.
    • You must use three different documents and/or textbook paragraphs for each flowchart.
  • TASK 2: (Drafting and Revising)
    • On notebook paper, write one complete CER paragraph of your choice from each flowchart.
    • If time, also revise and strengthen one paragraph based on feedback from Writing Center tutor.
  • TASK 3: (Sign off from Writing Center tutor -- you must ask for help at least once today)
    • At top of an evidence flowchart, write down the first name of the Writing Center tutor you worked with,

what they helped you with, and have them sign their initials next to it. Lastly, fill out "Feedback Form."

4.18.2018 (Wednesday)

Challenge Questions

Agree or Disagree: "The benefits of industrialization on a large, global scale outweigh the costs."

Performance Tasks

  • Compare and contrast capitalist v.s. socialist thought via a role-play.
  • Identify strong claim, evidence, and reasoning in your peers' work.
  • Analyze how the industrial revolution changed the lives of individuals through primary sources

Key Concepts

  • Capitalism, Labor Unions, Socialism

Featured Sources


4.17.2018 (Tuesday)

Challenge Questions

There are plans to build modern, hi-rise buildings in downtown Ann Arbor. Would you support this construction of hi-rise buildings in your town? Explain.

Performance Tasks

  • Identify, using a chart, what you know, wonder, and want to learn about the Industrial Revolution
  • Identify key characteristics and inventions of the Industrial Revolution using a graphic organizer.

Key Concepts

  • Industrial Revolution

Featured Sources


4.16.2018 (Monday)

**Big Debate Day**

Which of the revolutions, the Haitian, Latin American, American, or French Revolution, was the most successful?

Performance Tasks

  • Write an opening statement and one c+ev+r for the debate question
  • Debate which of the Atlantic Revolutions were the most sucessful

Key Concepts

  • All concepts from the Atlantic Revolutions unit

Featured Sources

  • Sources from previous week


4.13.2018 (Friday)

Challenge Questions

At what stage of revolution do you think our society is at right now: incubation, symptomatic, crisis, or recovery?

Performance Tasks

  • Present your information poster about your revolution to the class
  • Fill out a table to get an overview of the other revolutions

Key Concepts

  • The Stages of Revolution

Featured Sources


4.12.2018 (Thursday)

Challenge Questions

If there were talks of an overthrow of the U.S. government today, would you join the cause? Why or why not? What would your decision depend on?

What is the difference between "research" and "looking up an answer" to a question?

Performance Tasks

- Analyze primary and secondary sources to break down the drivers and effects of the four revolutions: the American, French, Haitian, and Latin American.

- Make an informational poster and present your work as a team to teach your classmates about a revolution

Key Concepts

  • American Revolution
  • French Revolution
  • Haitian Revolution
  • Latin American Revolutions

Featured Sources


4.11.2018 (Wednesday) **State Testing Day**

Self-Evaluation and Reflection Day:

On a sheet of paper (that you can hand in), write down, in full sentences:

  1. Three new key concepts, skills, or insights you learned about/improved on/gained in this class.
  2. Write down one skill you would like to continue to build on in this class.
  3. What part of class do you enjoy the most? The least? Explain why.
  4. If you had a choice, how would you like to be assessed? Be specific. (e.g. don't just write "a test" but write, "a test that is mostly writing instead of multiple choice")
  5. On a scale of 1 to 5, with 1 being the least confident and 5 being the most confident, indicate how confident you are at:

a. Writing in the form of claim, evidence, and reasoning

b. Getting the main idea from primary sources

c. Describing how the Scientific Revolution changed the way Europeans viewed the world

d. Explaining how Enlightenment thinkers' ideas are visible in our world today

6. Any other questions, comments, or concerns?

7. Write down an actionable step that you can take to improve your skills in #2.


4.10.2018 (Tuesday) **State Testing Day**

Challenge Question (3rd hour only):

How do you think Enlightenment thinkers and writers influenced the debate over whether to declare independence from Britain AND the debate over what words and ideas should be included in the Declaration of Independence? Explain (and use evidence from from HBO's John Adams).


4.9.2018 (Monday)

Challenge Questions

What form of media do you get most of your news? How often do you check your facts?

What do you think is the best way to spread information? If you wanted to spread information secretly, how would you do so?

Performance Tasks

- Analyze maps and secondary sources to review what North America and Continental Europe looked like in the 1700’s, pre-revolutions.

- Analyze how Enlightenment ideas spread through the British colonies in North America and Continental Europe

Key Concepts

  • Diderot, Salons, Enlightened Despots
  • Absolute Monarchies

Featured Sources

Enlightened Despots: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FZ_i6wTa7yw


4.5.2018 (Fri)

**Socratic Seminar Day**

“Rousseau's ideas on education were progressive/advanced for his time.”

Which Enlightenment thinker(s) best represent your views on government, rights, and freedom?

Performance Tasks

4.5.2018 (Fri)

**Socratic Seminar Day**

“Rousseau's ideas on education were progressive/advanced for his time.”

Which Enlightenment thinker(s) best represent your views on government, rights, and freedom?

Performance Tasks

- Discuss your analysis of texts from/about Enlightenment thinkers in a socratic seminar

- Compare and contrast the Enlightenment thinkers’ views on government, human rights, and education

- Analyze how Enlightenment ideas are relevant today

Key Concepts

  • All Enlightenment Concepts

Featured Sources

  • All sources form Enlightenment unit

Key Concepts

  • All Enlightenment Concepts

Featured Sources

  • All sources form Enlightenment unit


4.4.2018 (Thu)

*One-on-One conferences*

*Socratic Seminar Preparation Day**

Challenge Questions

Agree or Disagree with the following statement: “Rousseau's ideas on education were progressive/advanced for his time.”

Which Enlightenment thinker(s) best represent your views on government, rights, and freedom?

Performance Tasks

- Use evidence from Documents A-E (+ reasoning) to back up a your claim in response to the challenge questions.

Key Concepts

  • Chapter 22 Section 2 concepts

Featured Sources

  • Bring all sources and notes from this week


4.4.2018 (Wed )

Challenge Questions

1. Have you ever stood up to someone who was discriminating against someone? How did you explain to the person that this type of behavior was wrong?

2. What are your thoughts on the following quote in the New York Times opinion piece, The Enlightenment Project? "Today's anti-Enlightenment movements believe less in calm persuasion and evidence-based inquiry than in purity of will. They try to win debates through blunt force and silencing unacceptable speech."

Performance Tasks

- Annotate and analyze Wollstonecraft's A Vindication of the Rights of Women and Rosseau’s Emile to explore the development of thoughts on Women’s rights during the Enlightenment

Key Concepts

- Mary Wollstonecraft and early feminism

Featured Sources

- Women of the Enlightenment: https://www.slideshare.net/jboyerswitala/women-of-the-enlightenment-5778495?next_slideshow=1

- Herstory Video on Wollstonecraft : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IXC5H8c_hkw


4.3.2018 (Tue)

Challenge Questions

What are some ways to keep someone from gaining too much power? Think of a situation in the present (either in your life, or a more general example) where a leader had gained too much power, and what the consequences were.

Performance Tasks

- Compare and contrast thinking of human rights before and after the enlightenment

- Summarize the contribution of Enlightenment thinkers in a table

Key Concepts

- Voltaire

- Montesquieu and Separation of Powers

- Rousseau and Direct Democracy

Featured Sources

- Inclusive language resources:

- PPT for this week: https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1oo999jP6efSBaA7uBXl5D15RwLLjCIg03ULU67b95gs/edit?usp=sharing


4.2.2018 (Mon)

Challenge Questions

Think of one example in your daily life where you were glad school rules existed. Think of one example in your daily life where you were unhappy with a school rule.

Performance Tasks

- Write your own laws in the “abandoned on an island” activity.

- Analyse the Leviathan (Hobbes) and Two Treatises of Government (Locke)

Key Concepts

- Enlightenment

- Locke and Hobbes

Featured Sources

- The Story of Human Rights Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oh3BbLk5UIQ

- Crash Course on Hobbes (0:00-2:30, 3:30-): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Co6pNvd9mc


3.23.2018 (FRI):

BIG DEBATE DAY [Continued!]

1. Agree or disagree: "The government should be able to ban [*] scientific research that most people are morally opposed to." [ Agree or disagree: * "the use of" ]

2. Agree or disagree: "People should be able to democratically vote to allow or not allow controversial scientific research in their society."

Performance Tasks

  • Debate whether the government/the vote of the people should be able to ban some scientific research
  • Annotate primary sources to synthesize your knowledge about the S.R.

Key Concepts

  • Ch. 22 Concepts

Featured Sources


3.22.2018 (Thu):

BIG DEBATE DAY:

1. Agree or disagree: "The government should be able to ban [*] scientific research that most people are morally opposed to." [ Agree or disagree: * "the use of" ]

2. Agree or disagree: "People should be able to democratically vote to allow or not allow controversial scientific research in their society."

Performance Tasks

  • Debate whether the government/the vote of the people should be able to ban some scientific research
  • Connect past historical events (thinkers during the S.R.) to current issues surrounding scientific research

Key Concepts

  • Ch. 22 Concepts

Featured Sources

  • Week 1 and 2 Sources


3.21.2018 (Wed):

Challenge Question

1. Have you ever been on a social media site where a conflict broke out over an academic or political issue? Did either side manage to convince the other, and how do you think people were feeling in the end?

Performance Tasks

  • Write an opening statement based on the C+EV+R flowchart
  • Review discussion norms and rules
  • [Debate whether the Govt/the vote of the people should be able to ban morally objectionable scientific research]

Key Concepts

  • Opening Statements (Lead-In, Thesis, Arguments)

Featured Sources


3.20.2018 (Tue)

Challenge Question

1. One of the U-M buildings, the C.C. Little building, is named after a scientist that was a eugenicist. Do you think the building name should be changed? Explain.

(Eugenics is the practice of controlling the human population by encouraging/discouraging the reproduction of certain populations)

Performance Tasks

  • Summarize Galileo's experiences during the SR
  • Annotate sentences in documents E-H using the following:
    • "A" = Agree side can use this (explain why)
    • "D" = Disagree side can use this (explain why)
    • "A & D" = Agree side and Disagree side could use this (explain why)
  • Annotate sentences in documents A-D using the following:
    • "I" = Interesting (explain why)
    • "S" = Strange (explain why)
    • "R" = Revealing (explain why)
    • "P" = Problematic (explain why)
  • Organize an argument in the form claim, evidence, reasoning using an evidence flowchart

Key Concepts

  • claim, evidence, reasoning

Featured Sources


3.19.2018 (Mon)

Challenge Question

1. According to CBC news, a recent study showed that there is a "great deal of mistrust in science" around the world. Why do you think this is?

2. Why do you think it is so hard to convince some people about the facts surrounding drug use?

Performance Tasks

  • Define key terms with a warm-up game
  • Annotate and analyze Galileo's letters and other documents
  • [Make connections of key ideas on the S.R. using a concept map]

Key Concepts

  • All key ideas from S.R. chapter 22

Featured Sources


3.15.2018 (Fri)

Challenge Question

1. Have there been any moments in your life where the way you see the world/the way you understand something has changed radically? What kind of impact did this have on you?

2. Write down one new skill you strengthened or an idea you learned this week.

Performance Tasks

  • Identify (using the textbook to jigsaw) the information of thinking in different fields before and after the S.R.
  • Reflect on your performance in the first week of class

Key Concepts

  • Geocentric/heliocentric model
  • Scientific method

Featured Sources


3.15.2018 (Thu)

Challenge Questions

1. Agree or disagree: "The scientific revolution is still going on."

2. Agree or disagree: "Today, we are going through a scientific revolution as

radical and significant as the Scientific Revolution of the 17th century."

3. Agree or disagree: "Government should be able to ban [*] scientific research that most people are morally opposed to." [ Agree or disagree: * "the use of" ]

4. Agree or disagree: "People should be able to democratically vote to allow or not allow controversial scientific research in their society."

Performance Tasks

  • Create a T-Chart of characteristics and examples of primary and secondary sources
  • Analyze "The Shape of the Seas"for evidence of science prior to the S.R.

Key Concepts

  • Primary Sources / Secondary Sources

Featured Sources


3.14.2018 (Wed)

Challenge Questions

1. How would you react and feel if you woke up one day and everything – school, transportation, shopping, and entertainment --

were all completely automated and run by robots?

2. How close do you think humankind is to finding a "theory of everything"?

Performance Tasks

- Review the definition of revolution via a game

- Write down your thoughts on the “Flat Earth Society” video

- Examine primary sources to see how people understood the world before the scientific revolution

Key Concepts

- The Scientific Revolution

- The Scientific Method

- Claim, evidence, reasoning format

- Primary and secondary sources

Featured Sources

- ABC News Segment on The Flat Earth Society: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iYhmj8g4zhw

  • PPT 3.14: https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1hlOBkbI-XQQK_5B1pNyhg8cU9Bbo_HqhgZje8NuqYI0/edit?usp=sharing


3.13.2018 (Tuesday)

Challenge Questions:

  1. In the near future, genetic engineering of humans might become a reality.

How will this scientific progress change how you think and act?

2. Think of one example of technology that you cannot live without.

In what way will you be limited if you can no longer use this technology?

Performance Tasks

- Write a (brief) history of the human race

- Work with a group to analyze the impact of technological change

- Define "evolution"

Key Concepts

- Technological Change

- Evolution

Featured Sources

- York University's Timeline Gallery: http://euclid.psych.yorku.ca/datavis/gallery/timelines.php

- PPT 3.13: https://drive.google.com/file/d/13D2lEBqKE2nx4E3iNwRZPjDrjtknG9bp/view?usp=sharing


3.12.2018 (Monday)

Challenge Questions:

  1. How do you usually learn about the world outside of Ann Arbor/Michigan/the US?
  2. Where do you get your information about the rest of the world?

Performance Tasks

- Participate in the icebreaker activities (self-introductions and mapping)

- Familiarize yourself with class routines

Key Concepts

- World History

- Globalization

- Internationalism

Featured Sources

- “U.S. citizens attempt to draw maps” From the Atlantic: https://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2014/01/what-you-get-when-30-people-draw-a-world-map-from-memory/282901/