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Rhetoric and Reality: Critical perspectives on education in a 3D virtual world

posted 10 Feb 2015, 22:49 by Jason Zagami   [ updated 10 Feb 2015, 23:31 ]

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B9Vbwc04iGqzV2dUc243VXBmZUU/preview
Monday, 2 December 2014

Rhetoric and Reality: Critical perspectives on education in a 3D virtual world



Sue Gregory, Brent Gregory,  . (2014, December).Rhetoric and Reality: Critical perspectives on education in a 3D virtual world. Paper presented at the ascilite2014 Conference, Duneden, New Zealand. Retrieved from http://ascilite2014.otago.ac.nz/files/fullpapers/231-Gregory.pdf


The emergence of any new educational technology is often accompanied by inflated expectations about its potential for transforming pedagogical practice and improving student learning outcomes. A critique of the rhetoric accompanying the evolution of 3D virtual world education reveals a similar pattern, with the initial hype based more on rhetoric than research demonstrating the extent to which rhetoric matches reality. Addressed are the perceived gaps in the literature through a critique of the rhetoric evident throughout the evolution of the application of virtual worlds in education and the reality based on the reported experiences of experts in the field of educational technology, who are all members of the Australian and New Zealand Virtual Worlds Working Group. The experiences reported highlight a range of effective virtual world collaborative and communicative teaching experiences conducted in members’ institutions. Perspectives vary from those whose reality is the actuation of the initial rhetoric in the early years of virtual world education, to those whose reality is fraught with challenges that belie the rhetoric. Although there are concerns over institutional resistance, restrictions, and outdated processes on the one-hand, and excitement over the rapid emergence of innovation on the other, the prevailing reality seems to be that virtual world education is both persistent and sustainable. Explored are critical perspectives on the rhetoric and reality on the educational uptake and use of virtual worlds in higher education, virtual worlds.

Teachers’ Beliefs about the Possibilities and Limitations of Digital Games in Classrooms

posted 18 Nov 2014, 19:31 by Jason Zagami   [ updated 18 Nov 2014, 19:39 ]

Tuesday, 18 November 2014

Teachers’ Beliefs about the Possibilities and Limitations of Digital Games in Classrooms

Beavis, C., Rowan, L., Dezuanni, M., McGillivray, C., O’Mara, J., Prestridge, P., Stieler-Hunt, C., Thompson, R. & Zagami, J. (2014). Teachers’ Beliefs about the Possibilities and Limitations of Digital Games in Classrooms. E-Learning and Digital Media, 11(6), 569-581. doi 2014.11.6.569. Retrieved from http://www.wwwords.co.uk/pdf/viewmessage2.asp?j=elea&vol=11&issue=6&year=2014&article=4_Beavis_ELEA_11_6_web

Teachers’ beliefs about what it is (or is not) possible to achieve with digital games in educational contexts will inevitably influence the decisions that they make about how, when, and for what specific purposes they will bring these games into their classrooms. They play a crucial role in both shaping and responding to the complex contextual factors which influence how games are understood and experienced in educational settings. Throughout this article the authors draw upon data collected for a large-scale, mixed-methods research project focusing on literacy, learning and teaching with digital games in Australian classrooms, to focus explicitly on the attitudes, understandings and expectations held about digital games by diverse teachers at the beginning of the project. They seek to identify the beliefs about games that motivated teachers’ participation in a digital games research project while focusing, as well, on concerns that teachers express about risks or limitations of such a project. The authors’ aim is to develop a detailed picture of the mindsets that teachers bring to games-based learning environments, and the relevance of these mindsets to broader debates about the relationship between games, learning and school.




Secondary Worlds and computer gaming in Education

posted 21 Oct 2014, 16:59 by Jason Zagami   [ updated 10 Feb 2015, 22:18 ]

Friday, 3 October 2014

Secondary Worlds and computer gaming in Education


Zagami, J. (2014, October). Secondary Worlds and computer gaming in Education. Paper presented at the Australian Council for Computers in Education Conference, Adelaide, Australia. Retrieved from http://acec2014.acce.edu.au/sites/2014/files/attachments/

ACEC2014%20Secondary%20Worlds%20and%20computer%20gaming%20in%20Education.docx


Zagami, J. (2014
Secondary Worlds and computer gaming in Education [Presentation slides]. Retrieved from http://www.slideshare.net/j.zagami/secondary-worlds-and-computer-gaming-in-education



Fantasy worlds have long enthralled and engaged our imaginations with Tolkien defining those of sufficient detail as Secondary Worlds, distinct from the Primary World of our everyday experience. Within such worlds we can imaginatively explore beyond the narratives provided us and by combining such worlds with the interactivity of games, particularly computer games, extending this ability to explore persistent Secondary Worlds that we can influence and change, share experiences with others, and contribute to the mythologies of these worlds. This rich exploration provides opportunities to learn by enhancing the mental models constructed by our explorations of Secondary Worlds and transferring this learning to the mental models held of similar concepts in the Primary World. Two case studies are briefly detailed to clarify the concepts presented, firstly the use of a Year 8 Social Studies simulation of the world of StatecraftX in which empire building, resource management, and refugee dilemmas provided a context for student engagement with a Secondary World and transfer concepts developed in world to those under study; and secondly, the use of the Secondary world of the Simpsons, particularly the Springfield Primary School, as a familiar Secondary World setting in which to explore teacher education situations and transfer learning to real world practice.


https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B9Vbwc04iGqzUzBESnNQNi1CSDA/view?usp=sharing


http://www.slideshare.net/j.zagami/secondary-worlds-and-computer-gaming-in-education

Is computer gaming the new ICT to be integrated into school curriculum?

posted 21 Oct 2014, 06:15 by Jason Zagami   [ updated 10 Feb 2015, 22:17 ]

Thursday, 2 October 2014

Is computer gaming the new ICT to be integrated into school curriculum?



Zagami, J. (2014, October). Is computer gaming the new ICT to be integrated into school curriculum?. Paper presented at the Australian Council for Computers in Education Conference, Adelaide, Australia. Retrieved from http://acec2014.acce.edu.au/sites/2014/files/attachments/

ACEC2014%20Is%20Computer%20Gaming%20the%20new%20ICT

%20to%20be%20integrated%20into%20school%20curriculum.docx



Zagami, J. (2014). 
Is computer gaming the new ICT to be integrated into school curriculum? [Presentation slides]. Retrieved from http://www.slideshare.net/j.zagami/is-computer-gaming-the-new-ict-to-be-integrated-into-school-curriculum



Just as the integration of ICT into the curriculum took time and faced initial obstacles, so too does the integration of computer games into the curriculum. Emerging from a mixed methods research project focusing on learning and teaching with digital games in Australian classrooms, four distinct approaches to educational games are developed: Game Play as a process, Game Building as a process, Game Play as a context, and Game Building as a context. The SAMR model was applied to consider these as progressive adoptions of computer gaming that achieve increasingly transformative learning processes. Then within the use of games as contexts for learning, a Secondary Worlds model was used to then consider these contexts at Philosophic, Epic and Naïve levels. Finally, the TPACK model was extended to include computer games as a GPACKS evaluation model of the appropriate use of computer games for various curriculum content, pedagogical approaches, and student gaming preferences.



https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B9Vbwc04iGqzejVFOTNnQk1oVE0/view?usp=sharing

Redefining Education for the Digital Age: A Snapshot of the State of Play in three Queensland Schools.

posted 20 Oct 2014, 18:44 by Jason Zagami   [ updated 10 Feb 2015, 22:19 ]

Thursday, 2 October 2014

Redefining Education for the Digital Age: A Snapshot of the State of Play in three Queensland Schools.



Jamieson-Proctor, R., Redmond, P., Zagami, J., Albion, P., & Twining, P. (2014, October). Redefining Education for the Digital Age: A Snapshot of the State of Play in three Queensland Schools. Paper presented at the Australian Council for Computers in Education Conference, Adelaide, Australia. Retrieved from http://acec2014.acce.edu.au/sites/2014/files/attachments/ACEC14_QLD%20paper_final.pdf


Jamieson-Proctor, R., Redmond, P., Zagami, J., Albion, P., & Twining, P. (2014). Redefining Education for the Digital Age: A Snapshot of the State of Play in three Queensland Schools [Presentation slides]. Retrieved from https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B9Vbwc04iGqzQ0pqX1RaSTZuNUk/view?usp=sharing



As curricula change, so must the tools used by learners and teachers and the plethora of mobile digital devices will likely play a major role in redefining education. The Digital Education Revolution (DER), with funding of more than $2 billion, was intended to provide Australian students with a world-class education system underpinned by the effective use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT). In Queensland, DER funding provided 141 000 laptops to students in Years 9-12. However, now that DER funding has ended, the Queensland government and schools are considering BYOD options, in order to maintain a 1:1 ratio of computers to students. This paper reports the progress made by three Queensland schools with the use of mobile digital devices, whether supplied by the schools or the students themselves, and outlines significant positive outcomes and challenges experienced by these schools as a guide to other schools when embarking on mobile digital initiatives. Further, the study is framed within the methodological context of the Vital Case Studies undertaken in England (http://edfutures.net/Research_Strategy) and draws comparisons between the results of those studies and other schools across Australia involved in the Australian Snapshot Studies.


https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B9Vbwc04iGqzUzQ2OXE5NUt5TXc/view?usp=sharing


https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B9Vbwc04iGqzQ0pqX1RaSTZuNUk/view?usp=sharing


2014 Brisbane Serious Play Symposium

posted 18 Aug 2014, 22:49 by Jason Zagami   [ updated 18 Aug 2014, 23:10 ]

https://sites.google.com/a/zagami.info/www/theora/2014brisbaneseriousplaysymposium/2014-08-19_1609.png
Tuesday, 19 August 2014

2014 Brisbane Serious Play Symposium
Presentation contributing to a symposium of researchers and educators on the use of games in education.

Zagami, J. (2014). 2014 Brisbane Serious Play Symposium [Presentation slides]. Retrieved from http://www.slideshare.net/j.zagami/serious-play-symposium

Virtual worlds in Australian and New Zealand higher education: Remembering the past, understanding the present and imagining the future

posted 12 Dec 2013, 06:02 by Jason Zagami   [ updated 12 Dec 2013, 06:14 ]

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/259239531_Virtual_worlds_in_Australian_and_New_Zealand_higher_education_Remembering_the_past_understanding_the_present_and_imagining_the_future/file/9c96052a921a4a0e89.pdf?origin=publication_detail
Monday, 2 December 2013

Virtual worlds in Australian and New Zealand higher education: Remembering the past, understanding the present and imagining the future



Sue Gregory, Brent Gregory, Torsten Reiners, Ali Fardinpour, Mathew Hillier, Mark J.W. Lee, Lisa Jacka, Des Butler, David Holloway, Scott Grant, Merle Hearns, Kim Flintoff, Jay Jay Jegathesan, David Ellis, Marcus McDonald, Frederick Stokes-Thompson, Belma Gaukrodger, Jason Zagami, Chris Campbell, Xiangyu Wang, Jamie Garcia Salinas, Swee-Kin Loke, Sheila Scutter, Christine Newman, Ning Gu, Stefan Schutt, Helen Farley, Anton Bogdanovych, Tomas Trescak, Simeon Simoff, Caroline Steel, Penny Neuendorf, Matt Bower, Lindy McKeown Orwin, Tom Kerr, Ian Warren, Denise Wood, Charlynn Miller, Shane Mathews, Dale Linegar, Vicki Knox, Yvonne Masters, Ross Brown, Grant Meredith, Clare Atkins, Angela Giovanangeli, Karen Le Rossignol, Andrew Cram, Eimear Muir-Cochrane, Arin Basu, Michael Jacobson, Ian Larson. (2013, December).Virtual worlds in Australian and New Zealand higher education: Remembering the past, understanding the present and imagining the future. Paper presented at the ascilite2013 Conference, Sydney, Australia. Retrieved from DOI:http://www.ascilite.org.au/conferences/sydney13/program/proceedings.pdf


3D virtual reality, including the current generation of multi-user virtual worlds, has had a long history of use in education and training, and it experienced a surge of renewed interest with the advent of Second Life in 2003. What followed shortly after were several years marked by considerable hype around the use of virtual worlds for teaching, learning and research in higher education. For the moment, uptake of the technology seems to have plateaued, with academics either maintaining the status quo and continuing to use virtual worlds as they have previously done or choosing to opt out altogether. This paper presents a brief review of the use of virtual worlds in the Australian and New Zealand higher education sector in the past and reports on its use in the sector at the present time, based on input from members of the Australian and New Zealand Virtual Worlds Working Group. It then adopts a forward-looking perspective amid the current climate of uncertainty, musing on future directions and offering suggestions for potential new applications in light of recent technological developments and innovations in the area.








Social Ecological Model Analysis for ICT Integration

posted 1 Mar 2013, 20:39 by Jason Zagami   [ updated 10 Feb 2015, 22:22 ]

Saturday, 2 February 2013

Social Ecological Model Analysis for ICT Integration

Zagami, J. (2013). Social Ecological Model Analysis for ICT Integration. Australian Educational Computing, 27(3) 143-149. Retrieved from http://acce.edu.au/journal/27/3/social-ecological-model-analysis-ict-integration

ICT integration of teacher preparation programmes was undertaken by the Australian Teaching Teachers for the Future (TTF) project in all 39 Australian teacher education institutions and highlighted the need for guidelines to inform systemic ICT integration approaches. A Social Ecological Model (SEM) was used to positively inform integration support efforts of individual academics through their personal, institutional, professional, societal and temporal perspectives on ICT integration. A pre-post test analysis using the SEM framework categorised the influence factors on each academic, determined the factor most likely to affect change in the integration of ICT in their curricula, and provided a dynamic measure of the likelihood of successful integration to inform the application of support measures and maximise institutional integration outcomes. Initial results suggest that the applied SEM model can be used to guide institutional ICT integration efforts.



Introducing SMART Table Technology in Saudi Arabia Education System

posted 1 Mar 2013, 20:02 by Jason Zagami   [ updated 10 Feb 2015, 22:23 ]

Friday, 1 February 2013

Introducing SMART Table Technology in Saudi Arabia Education System

Almalki, G., Finger, G. & Zagami, J. (2013). Introducing SMART Table Technology in Saudi Arabia Education System. International Journal of Advanced Computer Science and Applications, 4(2) 46-52. Retrieved from http://thesai.org/Publications/ViewIssue?volume=4&issue=2&code=IJACSA

Education remains one of the most important economic development indicators in Saudi Arabia. This is evident in the continuous priority of the development and enhancement of education. The application of technology is crucial to the growth and improvement of the educational system in Saudi Arabia. Introducing SMART Table technology in the Saudi Arabian education system is argued in this paper as being able to assist teachers and students in the process of accommodating both technological changes and new knowledge. SMART Tablesalso can enhance the level of flexibility in the educational system,thus improving the quality of education within a modern Saudi Arabia. It is crucial to integrate technology effectively and efficiently within the educational system to improve the quality of student outcomes. This study will consider the potential benefits and recommendations associated with the adoption of SMART Tables in Saudi Arabian education system.

Keywords - ICT; Smart Table; education; barrier; implementation




Augmented Reality and Geography: The New Frontier

posted 21 Nov 2012, 00:29 by Jason Zagami   [ updated 21 Nov 2012, 00:56 ]

Sunday, 1 July 2012

Augmented Reality and Geography: The New Frontier


Jorgensen, M. & Zagami, J. (2012). Augmented Reality and Geography: The New Frontier. Queensland Geographer, 47(2), 4. 

AR and Geography are destined to become more intertwined, especially through the growing proliferation of mobile devices.  The combination of computer, internet and mobile technologies gives teachers so many more opportunities to engage geography students, as well as develop rich understanding and knowledge.  Testing the technology before implementing is vital, as is a willingness to take calculated risks and handing the power of learning over to the students.  humanities-based subjects like Geography and  history are fertile pastures ready to be traversed with this technology; virtually, figuratively and literally.







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