Skills Page

Examples of Supporting Details:

criteria that make up a strong supporting detail.


Example 1 is a 4 because it provides specific and descriptive details explaining how the geometry influenced ancient and its use.


Example 2 is a 2 because it is very general. It could be improved by telling more about Thales, what geometric share innovation was and how both influenced both ancient and modern times.


MLA Citation

How to cite a book in mla format:

Works Cited Page:

Last name, First name. Title of Book. City of Publication: Publisher, Year of

Publication. Medium of Publication.


Example:

Stangroom, Jeremy. Trailblazers in Religion. New York: The Rosen Publishing Group, Inc, 2015. Print.


Parenthetical Citation:

(Last Name Page#)

Example: (Stangroom 12)


How to cite a webpage in mla format:

Works Cited Page:

Author last name, author first name. “Title of webpage.” Website title. Publisher, date of publication. Medium of publication (Print or Web). Date of access. <URL_goes_here.com>.


Example:

“Islamic beliefs.” ReligionFacts.com. 10 Nov. 2015. Web. Accessed 20 Apr. 2016. <www.religionfacts.com/islam/beliefs>


Parenthetical Citation:

(Author’s Name) or if that’s not available (First few words of title)

Example: “Islamic Beliefs”



Cause and Effect

A cause is something that makes something else happen. Out of two events, it is the event that happens first. To determine the cause, ask the question "Why did it happen?"


An effect is what happens as a result of the cause. Of two related events, it’s the one that happens second or last. To determine the effect, ask the question "What happened?"  

Examples:


Cause

Effect

Joe got good grades



Stephanie was playing on snapchat during school


Christina helped her classmate that was struggling in math.


Eric  didn’t do his homework.

His mom bought him tickets to see his favorite sports team


Stephanie had her phone taken away by her teacher.


Christina was recognized as the Caught Being Good student for February.


Eric received a 1 on his HOWLs


Some cause and effect questions could be:

  • What caused __________ to __________?

  • What effect did __________ have on __________?

  • What are the events that caused __________?

  • What might happen if __________?

  • What is the effect of __________?

  • Why does a particular character (take a particular action)?

  • Why does __________ decide to __________?

  • What were the results of (an event or action)?


Categorizing

Categorization is when you group or classify people, objects, events and experiences based on the things they have in common with one another, or the things that make them different from something else.


For example: Laundry gets separated into whites and mixed colors.

Looking at this picture of tools, how can you categorize them?


Interpreting the Text

Gist

A gist is similar to the main idea but rather than picking out one main point, in a few sentences you describe what it is mostly about. Writing a gist doesn't ask you to narrow down the text to its most important parts, but rather to consider it as a whole.


Gist answers the question: What is this text mostly about?


Main Idea

The main idea is the point of the text. When considering the main idea, it's important to think about the author of the text and what their purpose for writing that text might have been, or what message they might want their reader to pass on.


Main Idea answers the question: What is the most important thing the author has to say


Paraphrasing

Paraphrasing is using your own words to express someone else's message or ideas. In a paraphrase, the ideas and meaning of the original source must be maintained; the main ideas need to come through, but the wording has to be your own


Paraphrase answers the question: How would you say this in your own words?


Example: 

The original passage:

Students frequently overuse direct quotation in taking notes, and as a result they overuse quotations in the final [research] paper. Probably only about 10% of your final paper should be direct quotations. Therefore, you should try to limit the amount of exact quoting of source material while taking notes.


Paraphrased Passage:

In research papers students often quote too much. Because the problem usually starts during note taking, it is vital to reduce the material quoted directly from the source.


Word Parts

Root Word: A unit of meaning that cannot stand alone but that can be used to form words with related meanings

Base Word: A word that can stand alone and to which affixes can be added.

Affix: Any part that is added to a word; a prefix or a suffix.

Prefix: A word part that is attached to the beginning of a word.

Suffix: A word part that is attached to the end of a word.


Example:

The base word 'treat' can have a prefix of 'mis' added to it, creating the word mistreat.

The base word 'treat' can also have a suffix of 'ment' added to it creating the word 'treatment'

The word 'agriculture' has a root of 'agr' which means farming.



If you would like to see a list of word roots, one can be found here: https://www.learnthat.org/pages/view/roots.html


Facts v. Opinions

Facts

  • Facts are statements that can be proven.

  • Facts may be true or false.

  • Facts are proven with data and evidence 

Examples

1. Statistically, women live longer than men.

2. Most buses weigh more than most cars.

3. There are ten inches in a foot (false).    

Opinions

  • Opinions are statements that cannot be proven.

  • Opinions are argued or claimed.

  • Opinions must be supported with facts to be effective and persuasive.

Examples

1. Golf is boring.

2. Pizza is delicious.

3. Math is the hardest subject.



MLA Citations: Book
Works Cited Page:
Last name, First name. Title of Book. City of Publication: Publisher, Year of Publication. Medium of Publication.
Example:
Stangroom, Jeremy. Trailblazers in Religion. New York: The Rosen Publishing Group, Inc, 2015. Print.
Parenthetical Citation:
(Last Name Page#)
Example: (Stangroom 12)

MLA Citations: Web Page
Works Cited Page:
Author last name, author first name. “Title of webpage.” Website title. Publisher, date of publication. Medium of publication (Print or Web). Date of access. <URL_goes_here.com>.
Example:
“Islamic beliefs.” ReligionFacts.com. 10 Nov. 2015. Web. Accessed 20 Apr. 2016. <www.religionfacts.com/islam/beliefs>
Parenthetical Citation:
(Author’s Name) or if that’s not available (First few words of title)
Example: (Islamic Beliefs)

Citing the Techbook
"Religion* Techbook." Discovery Education Techbook. Discovery Education, 2016. Web.
Example: 
"Islam Techbook." Discovery Education Techbook. Discovery Education, 2016. Web.
Parenthetical: 
(Religion* Techbook).
Example: (Islam Techbook). 

For more information on MLA citations, see the MLA

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