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Markers & Breeding For Resistance

Did you know that susceptibility is an exception in nature and resistance is the rule?
Mounting evidence suggest that plants as well animals including us, whether susceptible or resistant to certain diseases, all contain the the necessary genetic information for effective defense mechanisms.
 
 
 
ACTIVATION OF THE GENS FOR RESISTANCE IS THE KEA  FOR OUR HEALTH. CERTAINLY, NEITHER  THE PESTICIDES NOR THE ANTIBIOTiCS are the NATURAL solution for diseases control.
 
 
 
 
 
 
NUFAR - a sweet basil cultivar resistant to Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. basilicum - several stages in resistance tests
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 WASHINGTON POST

Scientists have high hopes for corn genome-                           

By David Brown

Friday, November 20, 2009

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/11/19/AR2009111903190.html

"Work in mammals suggests that scientists interested in things like human diseases would be well served  to pay attention to

 what's happening in plants, and in corn in particular," said Virginia Walbot, a molecular geneticist at Stanford University.

Indeed, it now appears that hundreds and maybe thousands of genes were involved in the domestication of corn.

 Moreover, mounting evidence suggest that plants and  animals including human being, whether susceptible  or resistant to certain diseases, all contain the  necessary genetic information for effective defense mechanisms.

Clearly, within thousands years of breeding for domestication of corn for better yield probably left behind many resistance threats against pests. The present genome will certainly be used to reintroduce these "lost genes" back to the genome and avoid long and sometimes frustrating conventional breeding work.

Potential implications of the unveiling of the corn genome:

  • Plant breeders will better understand genetic traits, leading to hardier plants.
  • Higher crop yields.
  • Greater understanding of genetic mechanisms, including ones operating in human disease.

Read more:

USA TODAY

Corn genome sequenced; given away to farmers, seed companies

By Monica Heger

November 19, 2009

http://blogs.usatoday.com/sciencefair/2009/11/corn-genome-sequenced-given-away-to-farmers-seed-companies.html?plckFindCommentKey=CommentKey:b46e658e-7bc4-4cbc-9592-46e4147e2500

 
 USA TODAY

Sunflower DNA map could produce plants for fuel

 

 

 

By Dirk Lammers, Associated Press

“A $10.5 million research project aimed at mapping the DNA sequence of sunflowers could one day yield a towering new variety for both food and fuel.

Researchers envision crossbreeding a standard sunflower with the Silverleaf species out of Texas to produce a hybrid with bright yellow flowers bursting with tasty seeds and thick stalks filled with complex sugars that can be turned into ethanol”.

Read more:

http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/genetics/2010-01-22-sunflower-dna_N.htm

 

It is time to recall how such achievements have been started while in 1961, Nirenberg and a colleague conducted an experiment that showed how the genetic information contained in DNA is translated into the protein molecules in cells. Professor Marshall Nirenberg, a scientist whose work untangling fundamental genetic processes earned him a Nobel Prize, has recently died at the age of 82.

 
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