Numerical Expression

MA STANDARDS
 Use parentheses, brackets, or braces in numerical expressions, and evaluate expressions with these symbols. (e.g. (6 x 30) + (6 x 1/2)) 




Once students' fact knowledge is strong, students area able to easily apply the standards related to numerical expression. Early introduction of these standards at the start of the year enables students to use these principles throughout the year as they deepen their math knowledge and learning. 

Question Types
 
 
 
 
  


Student Unit Goal and Objective: 
I will review and learn to write/create, estimate/interpret, evaluate/calculate, compare/contrast inequalities, expressions, and equations with mastery. 

Standards:

Grade 5
CCSS.Math.Content.5.OA.A.1 Use parentheses, brackets, or braces in numerical expressions, and evaluate expressions with these symbols.
CCSS.Math.Content.5.OA.A.2 Write simple expressions that record calculations with numbers, and interpret numerical expressions without evaluating them. For example, express the calculation “add 8 and 7, then multiply by 2” as 2 × (8 + 7). Recognize that 3 × (18932 + 921) is three times as large as 18932 + 921, without having to calculate the indicated sum or product.


Assess Your Knowledge: Evaluate The Expression Below. What is the value?

Evaluate: Calculate to Find the Value


What is the order of operations?
How can you remember the order of operations?

Watch this video and find out.
Notes for PEMDAS -- Remember "parentheses" in PEMDAS stands for all brackets (see image below). 

YouTube Video


Know the Unit Vocabulary

You may use brackets when writing order of operations. There are multiple types of brackets with parentheses the most common type of bracket used in mathematical expressions, inequalities, and equations. 

CCSS.Math.Content.5.OA.A.1 Use parentheses, brackets, or braces in numerical expressions, and evaluate expressions with these symbols.


Parentheses: ( )

“round brackets”

#1 first level


Also called bracket. either of a pair of characters, (), used to enclose a mathematical expression.


Example:


5 X (6 + 2) = 40


remember to solve the expression inside the parentheses first.

Brackets: [ ]

“box or square brackets”

#2 second level


Parentheses of various forms indicating that the enclosed quantity is to be treated as a unit.


Example:


6 X [5 X (6 + 2)] = 240


parentheses first, then brackets, then the rest following the order of operations.

Braces: { }

“curly brackets”

#3 third level



one of two marks { } used to connect words or items to be considered together



Example:



2 X {6 X [5 X (6+2)]} = 480



Expressions, Equations, and Inequalities Represent Relationships

An expression consists of a number, variable, or a combination of numbers and variables joined by operation symbols. Expressions do not contain an equality or inequality sign. Examples of expressions are:

 3 + 4 2a 3c + 8 –7

An equation is a mathematical sentence in which two expressions are joined by an equal sign (=). Examples of equations are:

 5 + 2 = 7 3 + y = 8 12 = 4a 4 + 6 = 9 + c

An inequality is a mathematical sentence in which two expressions are joined by relations symbols such as is not equal to (not equal to), > (greater than), < (less than), greater than or equal to(greater than or equal to), less than or equal to (less than or equal to). Examples of inequalities are:

 
x + 4 is not equal to 5               x plus 4 is not equal to 5
 c greater than or equal to 10       c is greater than or equal to 10
 
5 > 1                    5 is greater than 1
 
10<10.5    10 is less than 10 and 5 tenths


Making Fraction Models Helps You to Write, Interpret, and Evaluate
 Fraction Expressions, Inequalities, and Equations.

Decomposing Five into Fraction Equations




Practice Your Skill, Concept, and Knowledge Related to Numerical Expression 
with the Exercises Below



Practice with Brackets, Parentheses, and Braces




More PEMDAS Practice




Exploring Numerical Expression

 

YouTube Video

 

YouTube Video

 

YouTube Video


Collaborative Assessment (Take a peek if you're interested.)

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