Peer Mediation

Definition:  Mediation is a process to resolve disputes with the help of a neutral third party.  "Peer" mediation is when the third part is someone that is the same age or status of the parties in conflict.  

In a school setting, mediators are students, chosen by their peers (and their teachers), who help other students in conflict work cooperatively together to resolve their problems by discussing them in a nonjudgmental setting.  Mediators are not judges who determine guilt or innocence.  Conflictees create their own solutions as they are encouraged to attack problems, not other students.

Goals:

1.  Resolve student conflicts that interfere with the education process, and /or that have the potential to escalate.

2.  Build a stronger sense of cooperation and school community.

3.  To improve school atmosphere by decreasing tensions and fighting.

4.  To develop communication and peaceful conflict solving skills.

What Types of Conflict?

Personal problems with other students.  It is not recommended when the disputes involve teachers, weapons, drugs, physical/sexual abuse, and some instances of stealing or/and fighting depending upon circumstances.  Most of the conflicts tend to be bullying or rumors.

When and Where Is It Carried Out?

During school time upon approval of teachers (usually during Homeroom).  The mediators will have several private or semi-private areas in which to choose from.  It is important that the parties involved have a private, uninterrupted environment, but also within close proximity of administrators and counselors in case a mediator needs help.
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annette.hall@washk12.org,
Aug 26, 2015, 7:42 AM
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annette.hall@washk12.org,
Aug 26, 2015, 7:38 AM
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