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Laura

Final Unit

posted May 1, 2011, 5:45 PM by Laura Thompson   [ updated May 1, 2011, 5:51 PM ]

First Grade Unit:  Making Economic Choices

Inquiry Question/ Unit Theme

UNIT ESSENTIAL QUESTION(S):

How do families make wise economic choices? 


Learning Objectives: What students should know, understand, and do

 

KNOW

UNDERSTAND

DO

     Unit Vocabulary

     Difference between needs and wants

     Methods for obtaining goods and services (buying and bartering)

     Ways families and communities cooperate and compromise to meet needs and wants

     

Consumers (families) cannot have everything they want.

 

It is important for consumers (families) to make wise economic choices.

 

 

 

 

 

     Explain the concept of scarcity

     Summarize the role of scarcity in determining how people choose between needs and wants

     Role play making choices about goods or services based on given constraints (Ex:  You have $1 . . . )

     Compare and contrast the advantages and disadvantages using barter or forms of money to obtain goods and services 

     Identify events in stories and real life that exemplify the role of cooperation and compromise in meeting needs and wants

     Contrast the roles of producers and consumers

 

 

Content Standards to Cover


STANDARD 1-6:  The student will demonstrate an understanding of how and why people make economic choices and the importance of these choices for families.

Indicators

1-6.1    Explain the concept of scarcity and the way it forces individuals and families to make choices about which goods and services to obtain.  (E)

1-6.2    Explain methods for obtaining goods and services, including buying with money and bartering.  (E)

1-6.3    Identify ways that families and communities cooperate and compromise in order to meet their needs and wants.  (E, P)

1-6.4     Recognize the roles of producers and consumers and the ways in which they are interdependent.  (E)

 

Literacy Skills and Strategies Incorporated

Reading Store Advertisements

Written Response “If I only had $5”

Writing Break with video

List writing in t-chart form to categorize needs and wants

Illustrate and write about one good and one service, contrast in your own words

Goods and Services take-home journal

Written response “A time my family had to compromise to meet my needs and wants”

Written response “What job would you like to have? What will you do with your money?”

Written Problem-solving “Scarcity of CapriSun”

Written Problem-solving “Family Scenario”

 


Rubric for culminating activity

Students will create a written response to a scenario where families have to make economic choices based on needs and wants.  Students will make the family decision and explain their choice.  Student responses must include the words need and want (goods and services where appropriate)

Rubric:

+

Student clearly communicates and explains their choice.  Student’s choice is based on the family’s greatest need.  The words need and want are used to explain choice.

P

Student communicates their choice with weak explanation.  Student’s choice is based on the family’s greatest need.  The words want and need are used.

-

Student is unable to communicate their choice.  Student does not take into consideration the family’s greatest need.  The words want and need are not used.

 


Daily lesson plans

*Each lesson will take 2 days including the Culminating Activity (14 days total)

 

Needs and Wants

LEQ 1: What are needs and wants?

1-6.3    Identify ways that families and communities cooperate and compromise in order to meet their needs and wants.  (E, P)

Vocabulary: Need (things that people must have to live), Want (things that people would like to have)

AS: Unit Launch Activity: Catalog Shopping

Written Response: Imagine you have $5.  What are some choices you have for what to do with your money?  What will you decide to do with your money? Why?

TS: Anticipation Guide: Wants vs Needs (sorting worksheet)

United Streaming: The Difference between Wants and Needs (incorporate “Writing Break” throughout video to record information learned.

SS p130-133

DP: Students create a t-chart categorizing (list) things they want and things they need (cut apart grocery, toy, and sports weekly ads, take out inappropriate pages)

Computer Lab: Assign “Needs and Wants” on Compass to all students. 

SS/assess: Why do people around the world have the same needs?

If time watch any of the “Everybody Needs” (Food, Clothing, or Shelter) United Streaming Series to compare needs around the world.

 

Goods and Services

LEQ 2:  What are goods and services?

1-6.4     Recognize the roles of producers and consumers and the ways in which they are interdependent.  (E)

Vocabulary: Goods (things that can be bought or sold) Services (jobs people do to help others)

AS: Have you ever been to a store where there are things to buy? Have you ever been to a store where a person did something for you?

TS: (SS p138)

United Streaming: Production workers and the goods they create

Create a t-chart as a class to list/categorize goods and services

DP: Fold a paper, write good and service above each part, draw one good and one service you might buy. 

Take-home Project:  Goods and Services Journal- Students journal about 5 activities/errands they run with their families over the course of a week.  Students describe these activites and determine if goods or services were exchanged.  Additional information can be added such as the name of the store, cost, and whether it was a need or want.  See attachments.

SS/assess: On the back, explain the difference between goods and service.

 

Money and Bartering

LEQ 3 :  How do we obtain goods and services?

Standard:

1-6.2    Explain methods for obtaining goods and services, including buying with money and bartering.  (E)

Vocabulary: Sell (to exchange something for money) Barter (to exchange, trade, a good or service for another good or service) Volunteers (people who help others for no money) Cost (how much money is needed to buy something) Save (to put away and keep)

AS: Turn and Talk: Tell about a time when you saved money to buy something.

TS: Read SS p144-145 Turn and Talk about a time you have traded to get something you want.

DP: Small groups discuss the family dilemma on SS p146. 

SS/Assess: Do you think it is better to buy things or trade things? Why?

United Streaming:

Understanding Economics - Barter vs. Money segment

Learning About Money - History of Money segment

 

Meeting Needs and Wants

LEQ 4: How do families and communities work together to meet their needs and wants?

1-6.3    Identify ways that families and communities cooperate and compromise in order to meet their needs and wants.  (E, P)

AS: Write to tell about a time you wanted your parents to buy something for you. Include how you worked out the situation. Did your parents buy the thing you wanted?

TS: Read “Stone Soup” SSp162 (United Streaming: Stone Soup)recognize the community working together to meet needs

Where We Live, Work, and Play:  Businesses - select segments

DP: Students talk with their families about recent purchases (goods/services, needs/wants) How do we decide what to spend money on? 

Other literature to integrate: Mama I wanna iguana or I wanna new room: Bookd

SS: What are some ways people can earn and save money to get the things they need and want?  (Transition into Lesson 5)

 

Producers and Consumers

LEQ 5: How do consumers and producers depend on one another?

1-6.4     Recognize the roles of producers and consumers and the ways in which they are interdependent.  (E)

Vocabulary: Producer (worker, a person who does a job) Consumer (a person who pays for a good or service)

AS: Why do people have jobs? What would happen if people had no jobs?

TS: SS p 152 Tell about a goods/service job in our community.

Map Skills: Locate businesses on a local map

Where in our community can you buy a service you want?

What do people make or do at this business?

Where in our community can you buy a good you need? Want?

United Streaming:

How our Economy Works: All about Earning and Spending Money –2 segments Producers then Consumers

Create a t-chart of service workers and factory/goods workers

DP/Family Connections: Interview a working family member to find out about the job that person does.  What is your job? Do you make something or do something that helps people? Students share interviews with class.

SS/assess:  Written Response: Tell about the kind of work you would like to do one day. What will you do with the money you earn?

Extend: Research, How is it made?

“From Tree to Table” SS p160

 

Scarcity

LEQ 6:  How does scarcity affect our choices?

Standard:

1-6.1    Explain the concept of scarcity and the way it forces individuals and families to make choices about which goods and services to obtain.  (E)

Vocabulary: Scarcity (When there is not enough of something that people want) Decision (a choice made between two or more things)

AS: We only have 12 juices but 18 students.  What will we do?  Students discuss ways to solve the problem. 

TS: Scarcity is related to scarce, scarce means hard to find. Either the good/service is hard to find or money is hard to find. 

DP: “Making Choices” activity from portal

SS: What is something you really want?  How much does it cost?  What can you do to make and save money to reach your goal?

 

 

Culminating Activity:  Family Choices Scenario (written response)

Replace an old car or a buy a big screen television.  Go out to an expensive restaurant or buy groceries for a week.  Buy a car that gets good gas mileage or a fancy SUV that is a “gas guzzler.”   Small groups determine a solution and reasons to support their choice.  As a class discuss reasons for and against each choice and record.

Changes...

posted Apr 10, 2011, 2:25 PM by Laura Thompson

I started my unit this week.  It worked out well since we are also doing 'money' in math, the economics fits in quite nicely... and the kids love money!  I changed the T-chart idea just slightly for my needs/wants lesson.  They used real shopping ads and cut/paste needs and wants.  My first writing strategy was "If I only had $5."   Most kids wrote that they'd save it and buy something really expensive and fun (wants).  A couple of kids got the idea of "only" had $5 and stuck with needs, but didn't have any concept of how much $5 would buy... very typical of first grade.  One thing I added in, from a suggestion in our small groups Tuesday, was a take-home writing project where they kept a list of errands over spring break and whether they were purchasing goods or services.  I included a parent letter and rubric.  I am interested to get these back.  I am only requiring 5 entries, since some could do this in 1 day and not have to worry the rest of spring break. 

One of a Thousand

posted Apr 5, 2011, 2:35 PM by Laura Thompson

I became involved with NWP through a new teacher initiative called "Fresh Start."  My favorite time of day was writing because it was the time of day my students' personalities really got to shine.  I loved reading their personal stories and views of the world but I didn't see my students pushing forward in their writing or trying new things... and I wasn't sure how to get them to!   I decided that the UWP Fresh Start classes might have a thing or two to offer but didn't have high hopes.  Man was I surprised!  Leaving from the very first session I had a bag full of ideas, real "doable" strategies, that I could try the very next day.  From then on I have been hooked and bringing other teachers on board, too.  I looked forward to my classes each month and my fellow teachers tracked me down the next day to hear about the new ideas! Of course I couldn't stop here.  I applied and was accepted to the UWP Summer Institue.  What an enlightening experience that was!  I grew more in that month as a teacher and a writer than I have in my previous 4 years of inservices.  The SI gave me the opportunity to share with others everything the UWP had given me, the feeling that 'Yes, my kids will be better writers, and here's how."  My relationship with UWP had the chance to go full circle this year.  I was able to present to the current Frest Start group of teachers, an invaluable experience I can't replace to help others in the same position I was in only a couple of years ago.  Not only did UWP shape me as a teacher, it defined me. 

Untitled Post

posted Mar 29, 2011, 6:09 PM by Laura Thompson

I'm just posting what has changed since the last post.  I have elaborated, but not finalized, daily plans.  I know writing is the whole point but I'm struggling with where to plug the various writing strategies.  I am going to review our book and possibly try something new.  We'll see!

 

 

Literacy Skills incorporated

Writing Break, Ticket out the Door, Carousel Brainstorming (Goods, Services, Needs, Wants)


Rubric for culminating activity

Students will create a written response to a scenario where families have to make economic choices based on needs and wants.  Students will make the family decision and explain their choice.  Student responses must include the words need and want (goods and services where appropriate)

Rubric:

+

Student clearly communicates and explains their choice.  Student’s choice is based on the family’s greatest need.  The words need and want are used to explain choice.

P

Student communicates their choice with weak explanation.  Student’s choice is based on the family’s greatest need.  The words want and need are used.

-

Student is unable to communicate their choice.  Student does not take into consideration the family’s greatest need.  The words want and need are not used.

 


Daily lesson plans

 

Needs and Wants

LEQ 1: What are needs and wants?

1-6.3    Identify ways that families and communities cooperate and compromise in order to meet their needs and wants.  (E, P)

Vocabulary: Need (things that people must have to live), Want (things that people would like to have)

AS: Unit Launch Activity: Catalog Shopping

Imagine you have $5.  What are some choices you have for what to do with your money?  What will you decide to do with your money? Why?

TS: Anticipation Guide: Wants vs Needs

United Streaming: The Difference Between Wants and Needs

SS p130-133

DP: Students create a t-chart categorizing (list) things they want and things they need

SS/assess: Why do people around the world have the same needs?

If time watch any of the “Everybody Needs” (Food, Clothing, Shelter) United Streaming Series to compare needs around the world.

 

Goods and Services

LEQ 2:  What are goods and services?

1-6.4     Recognize the roles of producers and consumers and the ways in which they are interdependent.  (E)

Vocabulary: Goods (things that can be bought or sold) Services (jobs people do to help others)

AS: Have you ever been to a store where there are things to buy? Have you ever been to a store where a person did something for you?

TS: (SS p138) United Streaming: Production workers and the goods they create

Create a t-chart to categorize goods and services

DP: Fold a paper, write good and service above each part, draw one good and one service you might buy. 

SS/assess: On the back, explain the difference between goods and service.

 

Money and Bartering

LEQ 3 :  How do we obtain goods and services?

Standard:

1-6.2    Explain methods for obtaining goods and services, including buying with money and bartering.  (E)

Vocabulary: Sell (to exchange something for money) Barter (to exchange, trade, a good or service for another good or service) Volunteers (people who help others for no money) Cost (how much money is needed to buy something) Save (to put away and keep)

AS: Turn and Talk: Tell about a time when you saved money to buy something.

TS: Read SS p144-145 Turn and Talk about a time you have traded to get something you want.

DP: Small groups discuss the family dilemma on SS p146. 

SS/Assess: Do you think it is better to buy things or trade things? Why?

United Streaming:

Understanding Economics - Barter vs. Money segment

Learning About Money - History of Money segment

 

Meeting Needs and Wants

LEQ 4: How do families and communities work together to meet their needs and wants?

1-6.3    Identify ways that families and communities cooperate and compromise in order to meet their needs and wants.  (E, P)

AS: Tell about a time you wanted your parents to buy something for you. Include how you worked out the situation. Did your parents buy the thing you wanted?

TS: Read “Stone Soup” SSp162 (United Streaming: Stone Soup)

Where We Live, Work, and Play:  Businesses - select segments

DP: Students talk with their families about recent purchases (goods/services, needs/wants) How do we decide what to spend money on?  Make a list of goods/services your family buys at the store.

SS: What are some ways people can save money?

 

Producers and Consumers

LEQ 5: How do consumers and producers depend on one another?

1-6.4     Recognize the roles of producers and consumers and the ways in which they are interdependent.  (E)

Vocabulary: Producer (worker, a person who does a job) Consumer (a person who pays for a good or service)

AS: Why do people have jobs? What would happen if people had no jobs?

TS: SS p 152 Tell about a goods/service job in our community.

United Streaming:

How our Economy Works: All about Earning and Spending Money –2 segments Producers then Consumers

Create a t-chart of service workers and factory/goods workers

How things are made “From Tree to Table” SS p160

DP: Interview a working family member to find out about the job that person does.  What is your job? Do you make something or do something that helps people? Students share interviews with class.

SS/assess:  Written Response: Tell about the kind of work you would like to do one day. What will you do with the money you earn?

Extend: Research, How is it made?

 

Scarcity

LEQ 6:  How does scarcity affect our choices?

Standard:

1-6.1    Explain the concept of scarcity and the way it forces individuals and families to make choices about which goods and services to obtain.  (E)

Vocabulary: Scarcity (When there is not enough of something that people want) Decision (a choice made between two or more things)

AS: We only have 12 juices but 18 students.  What will we do?  Students discuss ways to solve the problem. 

TS: Scarcity is related to scarce, scarce means hard to find. Either the good/service is hard to find or money is hard to find. 

DP: “Making Choices” activity from portal

SS: What is something you really want?  How much does it cost?  What can you do to make and save money to reach your goal?

 

 

Culminating Activity:  Family Choices Scenario (written response)

Replace an old car or a buy a big screen television.  Go out to an expensive restaurant or buy groceries for a week.  Buy a car that gets good gas mileage or a fancy SUV that is a “gas guzzler.”   As a class discuss reasons for and against each choice and record.

Economic Choices, First Grade

posted Mar 20, 2011, 6:31 PM by Laura Thompson

First Grade Unit:  Making Economic Choices  (I chose a weak unit for my grade level... hopefully to beef it up a little)

Inquiry Question/ Unit Theme

UNIT ESSENTIAL QUESTION(S):

How do families make wise economic choices? 


Learning Objectives: What students should know, understand, and do

 

KNOW

UNDERSTAND

DO

     Unit Vocabulary

     Difference between needs and wants

     Methods for obtaining goods and services (buying and bartering)

     Ways families and communities cooperate and compromise to meet needs and wants

     

Consumers (families) cannot have everything they want.

 

It is important for consumers (families) to make wise economic choices.

 

 

 

 

 

     Explain the concept of scarcity

     Summarize the role of scarcity in determining how people choose between needs and wants

     Role play making choices about goods or services based on given constraints (Ex:  You have $1 . . . )

     Compare and contrast the advantages and disadvantages using barter or forms of money to obtain goods and services 

     Identify events in stories and real life that exemplify the role of cooperation and compromise in meeting needs and wants

     Contrast the roles of producers and consumers

 

 

Content Standards to Cover


STANDARD 1-6:  The student will demonstrate an understanding of how and why people make economic choices and the importance of these choices for families.

Indicators

1-6.1    Explain the concept of scarcity and the way it forces individuals and families to make choices about which goods and services to obtain.  (E)

1-6.2    Explain methods for obtaining goods and services, including buying with money and bartering.  (E)

1-6.3    Identify ways that families and communities cooperate and compromise in order to meet their needs and wants.  (E, P)

1-6.4     Recognize the roles of producers and consumers and the ways in which they are interdependent.  (E)

 

Literacy Skills incorporated

Writing Break, Ticket out the Door, Carousel Brainstorming, will add more as lesson plans develop.  


Rubric for culminating activity

Rubric…. Coming soon…Students will create a written response to a scenario where families are having to make economic choices based on needs and wants.  Students will make the family decision and explain their choice.  Student responses must include the words need and want (goods and services where appropriate)


Daily lesson plans

(Each lesson is approximately 2 days, details to come!)

 

Unit Launch: Catalog Shopping

 

Needs and Wants

LEQ 1: What are needs and wants?


Goods and Services

LEQ 2:  What are goods and services?

 

Goods and Services

LEQ 3 :  How do we obtain goods and services?

 

Scarcity

LEQ 4:  How does scarcity affect our choices?

 

Meeting Needs and Wants

LEQ 5:How do people work together to meet their needs and wants?


Producers and Consumers

LEQ 6:How do consumers and producers depend on one another?


Culminating Activity:  Family Choices Scenario (written response)

Strategy Reflection- Writing Break

posted Mar 13, 2011, 3:43 PM by Laura Thompson

I tried the "writing break" strategy this week and was amazed at the results.  I especially found it valuable for my boys with non-existent attention spans.  I adapted this strategy for my first grade classroom by using it with a science video instead of during a lecture as the book described.  I reminded the students that we were watching the video to learn more about the forest to build background before reading our weekly story The Forrest.  I outlined my expectations to them, explaining that I wanted their full attention on the video and that I'd stop the video every 2-5 minutes (at a logical stopping point) for them to record any information they learned or were reminded of.  I realized after the first writing break that I expected them to write anything they could remember, not just 1 fact per break.  Many of my boys who normally get 2 or so sentence during a 20 minute writing block, ended up with 2 pages full of rich information.  I made sure to let them know I was not grading for any conventions, I just wanted them to get the information down.  The least any of my students shared with me was 1 full page!  Normally after watching a video we have time to "turn and talk" and share 1 interesting fact from the video.  This strategy allowed my students to record, recall, and share everything they learned and found interesting.  It is in plans again this week.

 

My "new" strategy this week is 'ticket out the door'... although I use it often in plans, this often means the kids are telling me, not writing, one thing from the day's lesson.  I like the idea of putting it on an actual ticket, it may end up on an index card due to my free time to design tickets. 

 

 

Strategy Reflection- Carousel Brainstorming

posted Mar 6, 2011, 5:15 PM by Laura Thompson

The first strategy I tried was the Carousel Brainstorming activity.  The book described this strategy as an activating strategy or a way to activate or gauge prior knowledge.  I can completely see that working but I chose to use it as a summarizing strategy to review for the test.  My students just finished their study of Earth Materials.  For the Carousel activity I chose 4 Earth materials, rocks, soil, sand, and water.  Each of these words was written on a poster around the room.  Teams of 4 were created and I "randomly" chose the writer for each group.  By randomly, I mean I put the marker in the hand of the student with the best handwriting/spelling (a great plus for this activity was that not all the students had to write but all contributed knowledge).  Since it was a shared activity, not just for my eyes, I felt that read-ability was important for the whole class to benefit from the review.  I loved the conversation this started within the groups as they shared what they remembered from the unit.  Even if a student couldn't contribute any information, they were learning by listening to the conversations of their friends.  In the end, we reviewed the posters as a class and students again were given the chance to add more (since they were only allowed to write 1 fact on each board in the activity).  Given more time I would allow groups to rotate a second time to add more information.  Next time I do plan to try this activity as an activating strategy in place of the "K" in our tired KWL strategy. 

Draper Chapter 11

posted Mar 6, 2011, 5:02 PM by Laura Thompson

The authors reiterated that a collaborate relationship between content area teachers and literacy specialists is necessary to adolescents' success in content-area literacies.  However tensions can arise when these two educators do not see eye-to-eye.  They must first both adopt the new view of text and literacy the authors suggest.  Content area teachers must view the inclusion of literacies in their classroom not as "one more thing they have to teach" but as a means for teaching and fostering a true understanding of content-area texts.  These texts must also be authentic to the discipline, something "real" mathematicians, scientists, historians, might reference in their research or practice.  Students must not just "learn about the disciplines" but "learn how to participate in the disciplines" in authentic ways.  Now, in order for these 2 educators to come together and work effectively, the authors suggest there must be approachability, humility, and open-mindedness.  Just hearing those three words, images come to mind of people in my school who scream "stay away... there is my way and the wrong way... that won't ever work in MY classroom."  Thank goodness I live in my little first grade world where I am the literacy specialist and content-area teacher.  However, I do have the desire to move up in grade levels and hopefully will have the chance one day to collaborate in such a way, even with one of the above mentioned people and prove them wrong!! 

The Bee...

posted Feb 22, 2011, 2:31 PM by Laura Thompson   [ updated Feb 22, 2011, 2:51 PM ]

Yes, but James has no interest in reading WHATSOEVER, he has no desire to put any effort forth for anything besides how many days it is until March 1st... when his brother gets out of jail.  Or how many years it will be until he is 10 when his mom gets out of prison.  He can not remember that a makes /a/ or the difference between me and my. But he sure does love rocks!  If I can trick him for just a second that we are just exploring rocks (not learning) then maybe, just maybe, I can slip in a word and teach him something today. 
 
To the BEST of my ability, keep everything fun.  Keep everything real and exploration-centered.  Connect everything to his world, his interestes, his reality.  He may not be able to read a lick of what I put in front of him, is it so important that he be able to READ the word mineral on a page or that he was able to tell me "Hey, Mrs. Thompson! This looks like that Basalt we looked at yesterday."  Really?

Draper Chapters 1 and 2

posted Feb 21, 2011, 5:39 PM by Laura Thompson

I loved how the authors made content area teachers the 'experts' on content area 'texts'.  Traditional texts and reading strategies "fit poorly with the content-area goals of the teachers and the discipline-specific literacy practices in those content areas."  Content area teachers, by practice, read and create texts within their areas.  Literacy specialists then guide the content area teachers' instruction through questioning... prompting content area teachers to think about their 'texts' through a 'literacy lense'.  "What do you think about to make sense of this text? What do you need to know in order to create this text?" etc.  I find it very important to note that content area 'texts' must be authentic to the discipline.  Are we really going to ask our students to write a poem about linear equations? The reading (interpreting) and writing (creating) of linear equations ARE the authentic text and literacies needed in the math class.  What an eye-opener for content area and literacy teachers alike "because texts include all of the objects with which people make meaning, every content-area classroom is a text-rich environment." Literacy in the content areas needs to be viewed as reading and writing "in ways that other members of a discipline" would naturally within their area of expertise.

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