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Exoplanets at the DPS Annual Meeting

posted Oct 9, 2012, 1:08 PM by Abel Mendez Torres   [ updated Oct 14, 2012, 7:32 PM ]

Here are the exoplanet oral and poster presentations at the 44th annual meeting of the Division for Planetary Sciences (DPS) of the American Astronomical Society (AAS) in Reno, Nevada, 14-19 October 2012. Three exoplanets presentations will have a press-conference on Monday 15, from 12 to 1 PM PDT (3 to 4 PM EDT). Latest NASA Kepler results will also be presented in a plenary session on Monday, from 2:20 to 2:55 PM PDT (5:20 to 5:55 PM EDT). Check the press-conference presentations and the full program for all other planetary presentations.

P.S. There is also the NASA ExoPAG 6 Meeting on Saturday and Sunday before the DPS (thanks to @PlavchanPeter for the update). Available online via Webex.




Plenary on Latest Results from the Kepler Mission [October 15, 2012 @ 2:20-2:55 PM PDT]

TitleLatest Results from the Kepler Mission
Author BlockWilliam J. Borucki1, Kepler Mission Team 
1NASA Ames Research Center.
AbstractAs the Kepler Mission completes the end of its third year of science observations, calibrated time series data of increasing length are becoming available that make possible the detection of planetary candidates smaller than Earth and candidates with orbital periods nearing one year. Further, the greater capability and sophistication of the pipeline analyses improve the completeness of the results and provide better estimates of the parameter distributions. The most recent data release on 28 July 2012 (Quarters 6 through 9) adds an additional ¾ year of observations so that most planetary candidates with orbital periods as long as 273 days now show at least 3 transits. Data for an additional year (i.e., Quarters 10 through 13) are scheduled to be released on 28 October 2012. A first look at the size, period, and semi-major axis distributions of these data will be presented. Summaries of the planets confirmed, candidates that are being actively analyzed, and the methods being used to verify and confirm planets will be discussed. The Extended Kepler Mission operations begin on 1 October 2012 and many changes in mission focus and operations, data release, and science community participation are being implemented and will be outlined. Funding for this Discovery mission is provided by NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

Exoplanets Press Conferences [October 15, 2012 @ 12-1 PM PDT]

Underlying Architecture of Planetary Systems Based on Kepler Data


Julia Fang (Univ. of California, Los Angeles)
TitleUnderlying Architecture of Planetary Systems Based on Kepler Data: Number of Planets and Coplanarity
Author BlockJulia Fang1, J. L. Margot1 
1University of California, Los Angeles.
AbstractWe investigated the underlying architecture of planetary systems by deriving the distribution of planet multiplicity (number of planets) and the distribution of orbital inclinations based on the sample of planet candidates discovered by the Kepler mission. The scope of our study included solar-like stars and planets with orbital periods less than 200 days and with radii between 1.5 and 30 Earth radii, and was based on Kepler planet candidates detected during Quarters 1 through 6. Our analysis improves on previous work by including all available quarters, extending to 200-day periods, and fitting models to observables such as normalized transit duration ratios that contain information on mutual orbital inclinations; these improvements lend to a deeper investigation of the intrinsic distributions of planetary systems. We created models of planetary systems with different distributions of planet multiplicity and orbital inclinations, simulated observations of these systems by Kepler, and compared the number and properties of the transits of detectable objects to actual Kepler planet detections. Based on the underlying distributions of our best-fit models, 75-80% of planetary systems have 1 or 2 planets with orbital periods less than 200 days. In addition, over 85% of planets have orbital inclinations less than 3 degrees. This high degree of coplanarity is comparable to that seen in our Solar System, with the exception of Mercury. These results provide important constraints and insights into theories of planet formation and evolution.

Planet Hunters: A Status Report


Megan Schwamb (Yale Univ.)
TitlePlanet Hunters: A Status Report
Author BlockMegan E. Schwamb1, J. A. Orosz2, J. A. Carter3, D. A. Fischer1, A. W. Howard4, J. R. Crepp5, W. F. Welsh2, N. A. Kaib6, C. J. Lintott7, D. Terrell8, K. J. Jek9, R. Gagliano9, M. Parrish10, A. M. Smith10, S. Lynn10, J. M. Brewer1, M. J. Giguere1, K. Schawinski1, R. J. Simpson7 
1Yale University, 2San Diego State University, 3Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 4UC Berkeley, 5Caltech,6Northwestern University, 7University of Oxford, United Kingdom, 8Southwest Research Institute, 9Planet Hunters,10Adler Planetarium.
AbstractThe Planet Hunters (http://www.planethunters.org) citizen science project uses the power of human pattern recognition via the World Wide Web to identify transits in the Kepler public data. Planet Hunters uses the Zooniverse (http://www.zooniverse.org) platform to present visitors to the Planet Hunters website with a randomly selected ~30-day light curve segment from one of Kepler's ~160,000 target stars. Volunteers are asked to draw boxes to mark the locations of visible transits with multiple independent classifiers reviewing each 30-day light curve segment. Since December 2010, more than 170,000 members of the general public have participated in Planet Hunters contributing over 12.5 million classifications searching the 1 1/2 years of publicly released Kepler observations. Planet Hunters is a novel and complementary technique to the automated transit detection algorithms, providing an independent assessment of the completeness of the Kepler exoplanet inventory. We report the latest results from Planet Hunters, highlighting in particular our latest efforts to search for circumbinary planets (planets orbiting a binary star) and single transit events in the first 1.5 years of public Kepler data. We will present a status report of our search of the first 6 Quarters of Kepler data, introducing our new planet candidates and sharing the results of our observational follow-up campaign to characterize these planetary systems. Acknowledgements: MES is supported by a NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellowship under award AST-1003258. This is research is supported in part by an American Philosophical Society Franklin Grant.

The Very Compact Five Exoplanet System KOI-500: Mass Constraints and Implications


Darin Ragozzine (Univ. of Florida)
TitleThe Very Compact Five Exoplanet System KOI-500: Mass Constraints from TTVs, Resonances, and Implications
Author BlockDarin Ragozzine1, Kepler Team 
1University of Florida.
AbstractNASA's Kepler Mission has discovered thousands of planet candidates, including nearly 900 in systems with multiple transiting planet candidates. Such multi-transiting systems are extremely valuable for understanding the combined physical and orbital characteristics of planetary systems. Most of these candidates are in Systems with Tightly-packed Inner Planets (STIPs), which are characterized by a concentration of dynamically tight planets near 0.1 AU. There are about 10 Kepler systems that show 5 or more planets transiting, though it is not yet fully clear whether these are unusual or just a high multiplicity tail of a continuous distribution of STIPs. The first known 5-candidate system was KOI-500 and we here present results which confirm and/or validate all 5 planets and discuss its several distinct properties. Even for a STIP, KOI-500 has a very compact architecture, with all 5 planets within 0.1 AU. The estimated radii of the 1.0, 3.1, 4.6, 7.1, and 9.5-day period planets are 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 2.4, and 2.6 Earth radii, respectively. The outer four planets are very near unique and interlocking three-body resonances. The outer planets also show Transit Timing Variations (TTVs), allowing for good mass constraints and helping to fill in the exciting small planet mass-radius relation. The inclinations of the planets are generally well constrained, which, in combination with TTVs, allow for an investigation into the true mutual inclinations of this system. We will present an overview of the results of our analysis of the KOI-500 system and place it in context of other STIPs discovered by Kepler and Doppler surveys.

List of All Oral and Poster Presentations



100. Extrasolar Planetary Systems: Formation, Orbital Dynamics, and Habitability.

Oral
Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 8:30 AM -10:00 AM
Tahoe Room
Chair/Organizer(s):
Eric B. Ford1 
1Univ. of Florida.
Nikku Madhusudhan1 
1Yale University.
Presentations:
Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 8:30 AM - 8:40 AM
100.01. Underlying Architecture of Planetary Systems Based on Kepler Data: Number of Planets and Coplanarity
Julia Fang1, J. L. Margot1 
1University of California, Los Angeles.

Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 8:40 AM - 8:50 AM
100.02. Dynamics of Kepler's Multiple Planet Systems
Jack J. Lissauer1, Kepler Science Team 
1NASA Ames Research Center.

Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 8:50 AM - 9:00 AM
100.03. Planetary Assembly in Binary Systems
Stefano Meschiari1 
1University of Texas at Austin.

Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 9:00 AM - 9:10 AM
100.04. Changes in One Planet's Mass or Semi-Major Axis Affects All Planets' Eccentricities
Christa L. Van Laerhoven1, R. Greenberg1 
1The University of Arizona.

Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 9:10 AM - 9:20 AM
100.05. Tidal Evolution of Multiple Planet Systems Around Brown Dwarfs
Emeline Bolmont1, S. N. Raymond1, J. Leconte2 
1Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Bordeaux, France, 2Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique, France.

Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 9:20 AM - 9:30 AM
100.06. Orbital Stability of Moons around Giant Exoplanets and Free-Floaters in Planet-Planet Scattering
Yu-Cian Hong1, S. N. Raymond2, J. I. Lunine1 
1Astronomy Department, Cornell University, 2Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Bordeaux, France.

Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 9:30 AM - 9:40 AM
100.07. Planet Hunters: A Status Report
Megan E. Schwamb1, J. A. Orosz2, J. A. Carter3, D. A. Fischer1, A. W. Howard4, J. R. Crepp5, W. F. Welsh2, N. A. Kaib6, C. J. Lintott7, D. Terrell8, K. J. Jek9, R. Gagliano9, M. Parrish10, A. M. Smith10, S. Lynn10, J. M. Brewer1, M. J. Giguere1, K. Schawinski1, R. J. Simpson7 
1Yale University, 2San Diego State University, 3Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 4UC Berkeley, 5Caltech,6Northwestern University, 7University of Oxford, United Kingdom, 8Southwest Research Institute, 9Planet Hunters, 10Adler Planetarium.

Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 9:40 AM - 9:50 AM
100.08. Habitability of Planet-Hosting Binary Star Systems: Calculating the Habitable Zone for Circumprimary Planets
Lisa Kaltenegger1, N. Haghighipour2 
1MPIA , CfA, Germany, 2Institute for Astronomy and NASA Astrobiology Institute.

Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 9:50 AM -10:00 AM
100.09. Habitability of P-type Planet-Hosting Binary Star Systems: Calculating Habitable Zone for Known Circumbinary Planets
Nader Haghighipour1, L. Kaltenegger2 
1Inst. for Astronomy, Univ. of Hawaii, 2Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Germany.


103. Extrasolar Planets: Atmospheric Chemistry and Characterization.

Oral
Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 10:30 AM -12:00 PM
Tahoe Room
Chair/Organizer(s):
Mark S. Marley1 
1NASA Ames Research Center.
Lisa Kaltenegger1 
1MPIA , CfA, Germany.
Presentations:
Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 10:30 AM -10:40 AM
103.01. Chemical Characterization Of Extrasolar Planets
Nikku Madhusudhan1 
1Yale University.

Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 10:40 AM -10:50 AM
103.02. The Chemistry of Metal-Rich Hot Neptunes
Julianne I. Moses1, M. R. Richardson2, N. Madhusudhan3, M. R. Line4, C. Visscher5, J. J. Fortney6 
1Space Science Institute, 2Rice Univ., 3Yale Univ., 4Caltech, 5Southwest Res. Inst, 6UC Santa Cruz.

Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 10:50 AM -11:00 AM
103.03. Secondary Eclipse Spectral Retrievals: Trends in Chemistry
Michael R. Line1, E. Ellison2, X. Zhang1, Y. Yung1 
1California Institute of Technology, 2Flintridge Preparatory School.

Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 11:00 AM -11:10 AM
103.04. Spitzer Transits Of The Super-Earth Gj1214b And Implications For Its Atmosphere
Jonathan D. Fraine1, D. Deming1, M. Gillon2, E. Jehin2, B. Demory3, B. Benneke3, S. Seager3 
1University of Maryland, 2Universite de Liege, Belgium, 3Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 11:10 AM -11:20 AM
103.05. A Framework For Characterizing The Atmospheres Of GJ 1214b-type Low-mass Low-density Transiting Planets
Jonathan J. Fortney1, N. Nettelmann2, E. Kempton3, C. Mordasini4, K. Zahnle5, E. Lopez1, C. V. Morley1, M. S. Marley5 
1University of California, Santa Cruz, 2University of Rostock, Germany, 3Grinnell College, 4Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Germany, 5NASA Ames Research Center.

Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 11:20 AM -11:30 AM
103.06. Distinguishing Between Hydrogen-rich And Water-rich Exoplanets: Application To GJ1214b
Bjoern Benneke1, S. Seager1 
1MIT.

Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 11:30 AM -11:40 AM
103.07. Spitzer Observations of the Thermal Emission from WASP-43b
Jasmina Blecic1, J. Harrington1, N. Madhusudhan2, K. B. Stevenson1, C. J. Campo1, R. A. Hardy1, P. Cubillos1, S. Nymeyer1, D. R. Anderson3, C. Hellier3, A. Collier Cameron4, A. M. S. Smith3 
1University of Central Florida, 2Yale University, 3Keele University, United Kingdom, 4University of St. Andrews, United Kingdom.

Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 11:40 AM -11:50 AM
103.08. The Characterization of the Cool and Eccentric Exoplanet WASP-8b with Spitzer
Patricio Cubillos1, J. Harrington1, N. Madhusudhan2, K. Stevenson1, R. Hardy1, J. Blecic1, D. Anderson1, M. Hardin1, C. Campo1 
1University of Central Florida, 2Yale University.

Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 11:50 AM -12:00 PM
103.09. Evaluating Potential Causes of the Two Observational Classes of Exoplanets
Joseph Harrington1, J. J. Fortney2, M. O. Bowman1, UCF Exoplanets Team 
1University of Central Florida, 2University of California, Santa Cruz.


113. Extrasolar Planets and Systems.

Poster
Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 4:30 PM - 5:08 PM
Exhibit Hall
Chair/Organizer:
Darin Ragozzine1 
1University of Florida.
Presentations:
Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 4:30 PM - 4:32 PM
113.01. Characterising the Kepler Survey Completeness: First Full Focal Plane Results
Jessie Christiansen1, Kepler Science Office, Kepler Science Operations Center 
1NASA Ames Research Center/SETI Institute.

Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 4:32 PM - 4:34 PM
113.02. A Framework for Characterizing the Performance of the Kepler Exoplanet Search and Data Products
Jon Michael Jenkins1, J. Christiansen1, C. Burke1, S. McCauliff2, J. Van Cleve3, Kepler SO, Kepler SOC 
1SETI Institute, 2Orbital Sciences Corp., 3USRA.

Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 4:34 PM - 4:36 PM
113.03. χ2 Discriminators for Transiting Planet Detection in Kepler Data
Shawn Seader1, P. Tenenbaum1, J. Jenkins1 
1SETI.

Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 4:36 PM - 4:38 PM
113.04. Confirmation and Mass Measurements for Exoplanets found by Gravitational Microlensing
David P. Bennett1, MOA Collaboration, OGLE Collaboration, MicroFUN Collaboration, PLANET Collaboration 
1Univ. of Notre Dame.

Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 4:38 PM - 4:40 PM
113.05. Precision Near-Infrared Radial Velocities
Peter Plavchan1, NIRRVs 
1Caltech.

Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 4:40 PM - 4:42 PM
113.06. Efficient Geometric Probabilities of Multi-transiting Systems, Circumbinary Planets, and Exoplanet Mutual Events
Joshua Brakensiek1, D. Ragozzine2 
1Homeschool, 2University of Florida.

Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 4:42 PM - 4:44 PM
113.07. Self-consistent Model Of Debris Discs Coupling Dynamics And Collisions
Quentin Kral1, P. Thebault1, S. Charnoz2 
1LESIA, France, 2CEA/Paris 7, France.

Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 4:44 PM - 4:46 PM
113.08. Planet Formation in the Habitable Zone of a Triple Stellar System
Othon Cabo Winter1, R. Domingos1, A. Izidoro1 
1UNESP, Brazil.

Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 4:46 PM - 4:48 PM
113.09. The Stability of the Kepler 30 System and the Survivability of Kepler 30 Exomoons
R. Mitch Verboncoeur1, C. Fuse1 
1Rollins College.

Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 4:48 PM - 4:50 PM
113.10. Chemical Timescales in the Atmospheres of Highly Eccentric Exoplanets
Channon Visscher1 
1Southwest Research Institute.

Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 4:50 PM - 4:52 PM
113.11. Glints As Indicators Of Water On The Surfaces And In The Atmospheres Of Exoplanets
Ludmilla Kolokolova1, A. Borovoi2, A. Konoshonkin2 
1Univ. of Maryland, 2Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Russian Federation.

Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 4:52 PM - 4:54 PM
113.12. Near-infrared Transmission and Emission Spectra of HD 209458b: Demonstrating Palomar/TripleSpec’s Capability for Exoplanet Spectroscopy
Robert Zellem1, C. A. Griffith1, P. Deroo2, M. R. Swain2, I. Waldmann3, M. Zhao2 
1Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, 2Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology,3University College London, Department of Physics & Astronomy, United Kingdom.

Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 4:54 PM - 4:56 PM
113.13. C/O Ratios of Stars with Transiting Hot Jupiters: Connecting Stars to Planets
Johanna Teske1, S. Schuler2, C. Griffith3 
1Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 2NOAO, 3Lunar and Planetary Lab, University of Arizona.

Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 4:56 PM - 4:58 PM
113.14. Catastrophic Mass Loss Histories of Disintegrating Kepler Planets
Eugene Chiang1, D. Perez-Becker1 
1UC Berkeley.

Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 4:58 PM - 5:00 PM
113.15. Improvements in Equations of State and the Interpretation of Giant Impacts in Exoplanetary Systems
Richard Kraus1, D. C. Swift2, S. T. Stewart1 
1Harvard Univ., 2Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 5:00 PM - 5:02 PM
113.16. Ellipsoidal Variation Analysis of Kepler Observations Using the EVIL-MC Model
Brian Jackson1, J. K. Carlberg1 
1Carnegie DTM.

Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 5:02 PM - 5:04 PM
113.17. Removal of Cosmic Ray-Induced Noise from Kepler Data
Robert L. Morris1, J. M. Jenkins1, J. Twicken1 
1SETI Institute.

Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 5:04 PM - 5:06 PM
113.18. WITHDRAWN: Using Light Travel Time Effect To Detect Circumbinary Planets with Ground-Based Telescopes
Tobias Cornelius Hinse1, N. Haghighipour2 
1Korea Astronomy & Space Science Institute, Korea, Republic of, 2Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii.

Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 5:06 PM - 5:08 PM
113.19. The Anelastic Equilibrium Tide In Giant Planets
Francoise Remus1, S. Mathis1, J. Zahn2, V. Lainey3 
1CEA/DSM/IRFU/SAp, France, 2Observatoire de Paris - LUTh, France, 3Observatoire de Paris - IMCCE, France.


200. Extrasolar Planets: Kepler Outlook and Exoplanet Characterization.

Oral
Tuesday, Oct 16, 2012, 8:30 AM -10:00 AM
Tahoe Room
Chair/Organizer(s):
Nikku Madhusudhan1 
1Yale University.
Jon Michael Jenkins1 
1SETI Institute.
Presentations:
Tuesday, Oct 16, 2012, 8:30 AM - 8:40 AM
200.01. The Kepler Extended Mission
Martin D. Still1 
1NASA Ames Research Center.

Tuesday, Oct 16, 2012, 8:40 AM - 8:50 AM
200.02. Terrestrial, Habitable Exoplanet Projection from Kepler
Wesley A. Traub1 
1Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

Tuesday, Oct 16, 2012, 8:50 AM - 9:00 AM
200.03. Transit Timing Variations of Resonant Three-planet Systems
Anne-Sophie Libert1, S. Renner2 
1University of Namur, Belgium, 2LAL-IMCCE, France.

Tuesday, Oct 16, 2012, 9:00 AM - 9:10 AM
200.04. The Very Compact Five Exoplanet System KOI-500: Mass Constraints from TTVs, Resonances, and Implications
Darin Ragozzine1, Kepler Team 
1University of Florida.

Tuesday, Oct 16, 2012, 9:10 AM - 9:20 AM
200.05. Ground-based Transmission Spectroscopy Of The Carbon-rich Hot Jupiter Wasp-12b
Kevin B. Stevenson1, J. Bean1, A. Seifahrt1, N. Madhusudhan2, J. Desert3 
1University of Chicago, 2Yale University, 3California Institute of Technology.

Tuesday, Oct 16, 2012, 9:20 AM - 9:30 AM
200.06. Two 'b's in the Beehive: The Discovery of the First Hot Jupiters in an Open Cluster
David W. Latham1, S. N. Quinn2, R. J. White2 
1Harvard-Smithsonian, CfA, 2Georgia State University.

Tuesday, Oct 16, 2012, 9:30 AM - 9:40 AM
200.07. Constraining the Masses and Effective Temperatures of the Young Directly Imaged Exoplanets HR 8799 b, c, and d.
Mark S. Marley1, D. Saumon2, M. Cushing3, J. Fortney4, A. Ackerman5 
1NASA Ames Research Center, 2LANL, 3U. Toldedo, 4UCSC, 5NASA GISS.

Tuesday, Oct 16, 2012, 9:40 AM - 9:50 AM
200.08. Hydrodynamic Vs. Evaporative Escape: Exoplanets And The Ex-planet
Robert E. Johnson1, A. Volkov1, J. Erwin1, O. Tucker2 
1Univ. of Virginia, 2Univ. of Michigan.

Tuesday, Oct 16, 2012, 9:50 AM -10:00 AM
200.09. WASP-29b: Another Cool Exoplanet With Abundant CO?
Matthew Hardin1, J. Harrington1, K. Stevenson2, J. Blecic1, O. Bowman1, P. Cubillos1, S. Nymeyer3, WASP Consortium 
1University of Central Florida, 2University of Chicago, 3UCLA.


208. Extrasolar Planets: Atmospheric Circulation and Dynamics.

Oral
Tuesday, Oct 16, 2012, 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM
Tahoe Room
Chair/Organizer(s):
Jonathan J. Fortney1 
1University of California, Santa Cruz.
Ravit Helled1 
1Tel-Aviv University, Israel.
Presentations:
Tuesday, Oct 16, 2012, 2:30 PM - 2:40 PM
208.01. Atmospheric Circulation of Hot Jupiters: Dependence on Stellar Irradiation and Rotation Period
Adam P. Showman1, N. K. Lewis1, J. J. Fortney2 
1Univ. of Arizona, 2UC Santa Cruz.

Tuesday, Oct 16, 2012, 2:40 PM - 2:50 PM
208.02. Atmospheric Heat Redistribution on Hot Jupiters
Daniel Perez-Becker1, A. P. Showman2 
1UC Berkeley, 2University of Arizona.

Tuesday, Oct 16, 2012, 2:50 PM - 3:00 PM
208.03. Modeling The Atmospheric Circulation Of Gj 1214b: Dependence On Atmospheric Composition
Tiffany Kataria1, A. P. Showman1, J. J. Fortney2, M. S. Marley3, R. S. Freedman3 
1University of Arizona, 2University of California at Santa Cruz, 3NASA Ames Research Center.

Tuesday, Oct 16, 2012, 3:00 PM - 3:10 PM
208.04. Three-dimensional Atmospheric Circulation and Climate of Terrestrial Exoplanets and Super Earths
Yohai Kaspi1, A. P. Showman2 
1Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel, 2University of Arizona.

Tuesday, Oct 16, 2012, 3:10 PM - 3:20 PM
208.05. 3d Mixing In Hot-jupiter Atmospheres: Application To Tio Clouds On Hd209458b
Vivien Parmentier1, A. P. Showman2, Y. Lian3 
1Observatoire de la côte d'azur, France, 2The University of Arizona, 3Ashima Research.

Tuesday, Oct 16, 2012, 3:20 PM - 3:30 PM
208.06. The Longevity of Oceans on Terrestrial Exoplanets
Mark Alan Bullock1, D. H. Grinspoon2 
1Southwest Research Inst., 2Denver Museum of Nature & Science.