Enhancing Quality Staff in Changing Times

The 23rd symposium for library paraprofessionals and support staff presented by the University of Minnesota Libraries

May 19, 2015

Thank you for making EQS 2015 a success!



2015 Program

2015 Speakers information can be found at the bottom of this page. Links to presentations and handouts will be added to each session description as they are received.

8:00-8:30am Registration


8:30-9:00am Welcome & Opening Session

Welcome: EQS Planning Committee
Opening Session: Nancy Sims: "Professional Ethics: What becoming a lawyer has taught me about supporting library users."
Presentation slides


9:00-9:15am Break


9:15-10:15am Sessions

A. Dimensionless Data, Visualized
Steven Braun

Handout / Slideshow

"Data" means many different things across disciplines. In the libraries, we are poised to respond to this reality with dexterity; as crossroads for transdisciplinary connections, libraries provide support to researchers at any point along the data spectrum.

This unique position provides rich opportunities to think critically about how we perceive, define, and communicate data in ways that inform not only the work of our researchers but our work within the libraries as well. One of the most accessible modes through which we can explore data is visualization; however, for many people, visualization remains out of reach because of misconceptions about its relevance, purpose, and power. In order to think critically about data, we must consider the myriad ways in which our data can be transformed across different disciplinary perspectives and modes of representation and how we can leverage visualization along the way.

In this workshop, we will explore what it means for data to be "dimensionless" and the implications thereof for how we communicate data to many audiences. In the process, we will go back to basics to refine our thinking about what it means to visualize data and explore best practices to translate into our daily work.


B. Animal-Assisted Interactions: Enhancing the Library
Tanya K. Bailey & Nancy Brooks

Libraries across the country are exploring how animals can provide an incentive for patrons to seek out and enjoy reading, improve rates of literacy and educational performance, and even experience a “stress-break” during midterm and exam weeks like with the University of Minnesota’s PAWS – Pet Away Worry and Stress – program.

This presentation introduces the overall field of Animal-Assisted Interactions (AAI) and the various aspects of safety, training, evaluation, and best practices that are vital for a successful AAI program. Furthermore, a specific AAI program for libraries and schools is highlighted – called R.E.A.D.® – Reading Education Assistance Dogs. R.E.A.D.® has been producing results since 1999 and clearly shows why dogs, and other domestic animals, are beneficial for reading affinity and literacy improvement. An array of results from studies on R.E.A.D.® programs is presented, as well as how to best create and manage a R.E.A.D.® program at your library. The best AAI programs have well-
developed objectives, clear expectations for all involved – staff, AAI teams, and patrons – and understand the animal is a vital member of the team with unique needs. Including AAI programs, like R.E.A.D.®, in your library is a natural way to support human wellbeing across the lifespan.


C. Get Ready for Gardening!
Julie Weisenhorn


AT LAST it's gardening season! What to do first? Get the scoop on 10 tips for the upcoming growing season from extension educator Julie Weisenhorn, including plant selection, design, soil care, planning and some cool new plants you might want to try!


D. Honey Bees, Beekeeping and Research
Gary Reuter

This session will cover the fascinating biology and social structure of honey bees. Other topics include the importance of honey bees as pollinators, beekeeping as a hobby or career, and finally a summary of the related research conducted at the Univeristy of Minnesota. Other native pollinating bees may also be discussed.


F. Conservatory Tour: Rare & Unusual Plants (1 of 2)
Alex Eilts

It's not well known, but the University of Minnesota houses more plant species than anywhere else in the state. Many of these species are of economic importance, but there are also numerous rare and unusual plant species that are only on public display at the CBS Conservatory. If you like unusual plants, and not just the same old plants you find at big box stores, this is the place for you! We aren't a display conservatory, so we don't have rotating shows of flowers, but we do have species you aren't likely to see anywhere else. This is your opportunity to get a personal tour from the curator of the collection.



9:15-11:30am Sessions

E. Novel Illusions: An Introduction to Folded Book Art (2 hrs)

Wendy Kieser

Books are for more than just reading: they can be folded into fantastic works of art. This class will show you one way to create a pattern for a folded book and introduce you to the basics of making folded book art (including some hands-on time to create your first piece of folded book art).


10:15-10:30am Break


10:30-11:30am Sessions

G. Methods and Approaches in Redesigning Library Spaces
Steven Braun, Emily Goff, & Kevin Umidon

Link to Online Tool

Even with an increasing virtual presence, physical spaces continue to be an important aspect of what libraries are. The panelists for this session hope to engage others in a discussion about creating and maintaining relevant spaces in the midst of recent (and not-so-recent) changes in Library services. How do all of the changes in services impact design? How can we efficiently discover more about users’ wants and needs in a changing environment? This panel will provide three unique perspectives on space design in libraries with examples of data-driven approaches and tools from both academic and public libraries.


H. Planning for Your Financial Future!
Dan Ament

Presentation / GIC Slides / Handout with Resources

A recent survey concluded what many people already know, a majority of American’s are worried about their financial future. Given the often difficult task of managing day-to-day finances, thinking about saving, investing and funding your future retirement can be an overwhelming topic to contemplate. This session seeks to provide an interesting presentation of practical education addressing key areas of your financial life that you can embrace to enhance your financial well-being. Dan will address topics including; an update on the capital markets environment for investors, Finance 101… The basics of investing, Building a budget, Savings tips … how much and what types of accounts should you save in first?, Strategies for managing student and consumer debt, Saving for college and how building a financial plan doesn't have to be complicated. Various resources will be provided including useful web links to further research the topics discussed. Join Dan for an encouraging discussion that he hopes will impart actionable ideas to help get you ahead financially.


I. Supervising Students and Volunteers: Panel and Discussion
Mary Blissenbach, Margie Schuster, and Jessica Mattson

Many libraries rely on student employees and volunteers to help with a variety tasks, and organizing these helpers can have its challenges. Bring your questions and join the discussion with three seasoned student/volunteer coordinators from both public and academic library settings. We'll discuss ideas to tackle those challenges, including hiring and scheduling, motivation, work expectations, and more!


J. The Gut-Brain Axis: A Superhighway Between Health and Disease
Sidney Pharis

Presentation

Did you know you have a "second brain?" With more than one hundred million nerve cells in the human small intestines alone, it's no wonder the gut has taken on a new name. This presentation will take an in-depth look at the intricate relationship between the health of our gastrointestinal tract, the human micro-biome, and our mental-emotional well-being. Learn how specific conditions such as Irritable Bowel Syndrome, chronic gas and bloating, and constipation directly relates to anxiety, stress, depressed mood, and other psychological states. You'll certainly be "thinking twice" after leaving this informative discussion.


K. Raptor Center Tour (offering 1 of 2)

In order to take advantage of the rich St Paul campus location, we are offering walking tours of interesting locations near the Continuing Education Conference Center. Meet the EQS walking tour coordinator near the registration table for a walk to the Raptor Center and a scheduled tour. Rain or shine; please come prepared for the various weather conditions possible in Spring. Limit 10 participants per session.


11:30-12:45pm Lunch


12:45-1:45pm Sessions

L. South Asian Textiles: One Collector's Perspective
Donald Clay Johnson

A survey of the major textile types of South Asia with a concentration upon surface design textiles (block printing, embroidery, and, tie and dye).


M. The Storied History of the Minnesota State Fair
Keri Huber

Presentation (Large file, may have to download to view)

When you walk through the gates of the Minnesota State Fair, you are enveloped with sites, sounds, smells and more that is unlike any other time of the year. You know what the State Fair is like now, but do you ever wonder how it came to be? With its roots in agriculture, the Minnesota State Fair has been a fixture of Minnesota since its first territorial fair in 1855. While agriculture is still the primary focus, the scope of activities has broadened to include large-scale entertainment, technological and industrial exhibits and participation of scores of education and government institutions. With a mix of historical facts, anecdotes and photographs depicting agriculture, competitions, entertainment and exhibits, you will see how the State Fair was and is a feast for the senses, and that it truly is the Great Minnesota Get-Together.


O. Radical Recruiting: What You Need to Know
FBI Intelligence Analyst assigned to a Joint Terrorism Task Force

This presentation discusses the recent trend of Minnesota residents traveling to Syria to join the terrorist group ISIL (the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant). ISIL is also examined generally to include its human rights abuses, strained relations with al-Qa'ida, and threats posed to the United States. Recent local recruitment is viewed as a continuation of prior Minnesota travelers joining al-Shabaab in Somalia. Clips of terrorist videos targeting Minneapolis are also briefly examined.


P. Common Computer & Online Threats: What You Need to Know
Mike Sutliff

Presentation

The presentation will begin with an honest discussion on what the bad guys are looking for, how we unexpectedly respond, and how easy it is to get caught in phishing attempts. Then I'll switch gears and talk about some of the things we can do to deter the bad guys from compromising our computers and in some cases, our identity.


Q. Conservatory Tour: Rare & Unusual Plants (offering 2 of 2)
Alex Eilts

It's not well known, but the University of Minnesota houses more plant species than anywhere else in the state. Many of these species are of economic importance, but there are also numerous rare and unusual plant species that are only on public display at the CBS Conservatory. If you like unusual plants, and not just the same old plants you find at big box stores, this is the place for you! We aren't a display conservatory, so we don't have rotating shows of flowers, but we do have species you aren't likely to see anywhere else. This is your opportunity to get a personal tour from the curator of the collection. Limit 20 participants per session.


12:45pm-3:00pm Session

N. 3D Printers: Choosing One, Running One and Having Fun!
Robert Cudinski

Presentation

There are a number of 3D printers on the market and people have a lot of questions like; What are the differences between different types of printers? How easy it is? What can I do with it? This session offers not only to talk about different types of 3D printers, but also show you a couple in action. I will bring my printers with me and show them operating. We will talk about price and what to look for and how to choose. How to run one, the software we can use and the things you should know about operating one.


1:45pm-2:00pm Break


2:00pm-3:00pm Sessions

R. Demystifying Grants: An Insider's Secrets Revealed
Linda Greve

Presentation

Grants are important to libraries. Not only do they provide funding for special projects and initiatives, they are an important tool for professional growth. If you've been curious to find out what's involved, you'll learn the answers to these important questions: Where can you find funders? How do you know if your idea is fundable? Does it take a specialized skill to write a successful proposal? Do you have a great idea for a project but are unsure where to start? You'll get practical tips and real-world examples with plenty of time to ask questions.


S. Yoga for the Office (offering 1 of 2)
Jen Tantzen

Presentation

Between our desks, steering wheels, and mobile devices, we spend a lot of time hunched over and stressed out. Yoga can help with that, in both mind and body. This session will guide you through simple asanas (poses) that you can do at the office or at home to stretch out the body and soothe the mind. Limit 30 participants per session.


T. If You Wanna Be Appy: An App Showcase

LeAnn Suchy & Heather Tompkins

Pinterest Board

Navigating the world of apps can be daunting. Let us be your guide to some apps we love! We will highlight apps for productivity, education, organization, creativity and a little bit of fun. Android and Apple apps for all ages will be highlighted, so you are bound to come away with something to explore or some new ideas for using familiar apps.


U. Raptor Center Tour: Offering 2 of 2

In order to take advantage of the rich St Paul campus location, we are offering walking tours of interesting locations near the Continuing Education Conference Center. Meet the EQS walking tour coordinator near the registration table for a walk to the Raptor Center and a scheduled tour. Rain or shine; please come prepared for the various weather conditions possible in Spring. Limit 10 participants per session.


3:00pm-3:15pm Break


3:15pm-4:15pm Sessions

V. The University of Minnesota Insect Collection
Robin Thomson

I will be providing a display of insect specimens from the U of MN Insect Collection for general viewing. I will also be happy to answer general questions about insects.


W. Tools, Tips and What to Watch Out For in Answering Legal and Medical Questions
Del Reed, Kurt Meyer

In this session, representatives from the University of Minnesota Bio-Medical Library and Law Library will briefly discuss selected tools that can be used by library staff without backgrounds in medicine or law to answer questions in both subject areas. The presenters will also discuss legal and ethical issues library staff should be aware of in answering such questions.


X. Giving Voice: Archiving the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community
Lisa Vecoli

How do you archive the history of people who have had to remain hidden?

The Tretter Collection in Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Studies was started decades ago by Jean-Nickolaus Tretter in an era when most of the community was invisible. Today we have over 3,000 linear feet of material, including 58 different languages. This session will describe how Tretter started collecting, what he found and how the archive came to the University of Minnesota.

From books, periodicals, organizational records and personal papers, we will explore some of the treasures of the Tretter Collection, what researchers use the material for and how anyone can explore the archive. We will also explore the moments in Minnesota history that have had a national and international impact on the fight for GLBT rights.


Y. Yoga for the Office (offering 2 of 2)
Jen Tantzen

Presentation

Between our desks, steering wheels, and mobile devices, we spend a lot of time hunched over and stressed out. Yoga can help with that, in both mind and body. This session will guide you through simple asanas (poses) that you can do at the office or at home to stretch out the body and soothe the mind. Limit 30 participants per session.


Z. Equine Center Tour

In order to take advantage of the rich St Paul campus location, we are offering walking tours of interesting locations near the Continuing Education Conference Center. Meet the EQS walking tour coordinator near the registration table in the Lobby for a walk to the Equine Center and a scheduled tour. Rain or shine; please come prepared for the various weather conditions possible in Spring. Limit 15 participants per session.
www.cvm.umn.edu/umec/


4:15pm-4:30pm Prize Drawing



2015 Speaker Bios



Opening Session: Nancy Sims
Nancy Sims is an attorney and librarian, who uses her "lawyerbrarian" status to help people understand a wide variety of public interest issues, and to advocate for policies and practices that support sustainable scholarship, democratic information access, and wide public cultural participation. She has worked in libraries for about 15 years, and has an MLS from Rutgers, and a JD from the University of Michigan.


A. Steven Braun
Steven Braun is the Informatics/Data Services Specialist in the University of Minnesota Health Sciences Libraries. He received his B.A. (2011) in chemistry and Asian studies from St. Olaf College and his M.S. (2013) in molecular biophysics and biochemistry from Yale University. His work and interests involve the theory and practice of data visualization, systems-level informatics and data analytics, and theoretical frameworks for working with and representing data in both research and administrative settings. As a web developer, he sustains interest in design and implementation of web applications that better facilitate workflows for academic assessment, teaching, and learning. As a former Fulbright Fellow and speaker of Japanese, he seeks out unique opportunities for creative work at the intersection of language, informatics, and education.

B. Tanya K. Bailey & Nancy Brooks
Tanya K. Bailey, MSW, LSSW, LICSW, is faculty at the University of Minnesota (UMN) in the Center for Spirituality and Healing where she teaches two graduate courses on Animal-Assisted Interactions (AAI), and is the Animal-Assisted Interaction Program Specialist at the University of Minnesota’s Landscape Arboretum. She brings over 20 years’ experience developing and providing AAI programs and services in mental health, wellness, and education for youth, families, adults, and human-service organizations. In 2013, she developed UMN’s Pet Away Worry and Stress (PAWS) program, the first university-based AAI program to address student mental health needs through weekly, free-of-charge, no-appointment-needed sessions offered throughout the academic year. She is a licensed therapy animal team evaluator with Pet Partners®; equine specialist in mental health and learning with Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International; and works with her registered therapy chicken, Woodstock, horses at UMN’s Equine Center, and other animals at sites in the Twin Cities. Tanya is a Ph.D. student at UMN’s School of Social Work with an emphasis on codifying the therapeutic relationship between animals and people, and is in the midst of a year-long research study on PAWS.

Nancy Brooks has been an active R.E.A.D.® (Reading Education Assistance Dogs) team in schools, libraries, and special events since 2004. She is a master instructor for R.E.A.D., the director of the all-volunteer local R.E.A.D. affiliate, R.E.A.D.® Dogs Minnesota, and the Education Manager of R.E.A.D.® Headquarters. Nancy is a licensed instructor and evaluator for Pet Partners and for Intermountain Therapy Animals. Nancy is also a professional project manager, PMP, with over 25 years’ experience implementing product, process, and systems improvements for international finance companies.

C. Julie Weisenhorn
A two-time graduate of the University of Minnesota, Julie holds a Master’s degree in visual communication from the School of Journalism and Mass Communication, and worked 12 years in business marketing and management in the imaging industry. Shifting career gears, she graduated from the University’s Department of Horticultural Science with a Master of Agriculture degree in 2002 and taught beginning and advanced landscape design courses. She was instrumental in developing the CAD lab and later taught a computer-aided design course. From 2007 to 2013, Julie served as state director of the U of M Extension Master Gardener Program where she focused on creating a broader, more statewide volunteer community. In 2014, she was promoted to her current position as a full-time extension educator. In this role, Julie provides outreach education on various Extension horticulture topics with a special focus on plant selection and sustainable landscape design. In her own words, “This is the best job I have ever had.” A native of Rochester, MN, Julie and her husband Karl live in Mound, MN, where Julie experiments in her own backyard with small space landscape design and just can’t say no to a new plant.

D. Gary Reuter
A long time hobby beekeeper and trained in technology education, Gary began working with Marla Spivak at the U of MN Bee Lab when she moved to Minnesota in 1993. He maintains the research colonies, helps train and work with students in the field, designs & builds specialty equipment and speaks to beekeeping student and civic groups. He plans the Extension short courses and together with Marla teaches beginning as well as experienced beekeepers. His humorous style of teaching helps the classes stay interested and enthusiastic about a sometimes challenging subject.

E. Wendy Kieser
Wendy has worked for the University Libraries for the 24 years. Currently she works in West Bank Libraries Binding and Preservation Unit, the Google Digitization Project, the Fragile Book Project, and Government Publications. Outside of work she is interested in many types of crafts, including crocheting, knitting, quilting, sewing, cross stitch, needle felting, and cake decorating.

F. Alex Eilts
Plants are awesome! Don't believe me? Come down to the greenhouse, and I'll show you what makes them so great. With my background in plant ecophysiology, I don't just see plants as pretty flowers, nice foliage, or food. Nope, plants are organisms that have adapted to a wide set of conditions despite common limitations. I particularly like examples of convergent evolution, when species have evolved similar adaptations despite not being closely related. Most people may see the diversity of plants as a green backdrop to our world, but I love the diversity of forms, shapes, and adaptations they display. Plants are every bit as diverse as animals, you just have to stop and look a little closer.

G. Emily Goff, Steven Braun, & Kevin Umidon

Emily Goff, PhD is an experienced trainer and evaluator who holds a PhD from The Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development at the University of Minnesota. She has taught in a wide variety of settings from preschool to adult literacy programs. She currently teaches an undergraduate course on research design and has coauthored dozens of articles and book chapters on pedagogy, program and teacher evaluation, and policy. She has worked for the University of Minnesota Libraries to engage users and staff to create program statements for the first floor of Wilson Library and the Bio-Medical Library in Diehl Hall.

Kevin Umidon, Senior Administrative Manager at Hennepin County Libraries. I am an Architect and Facilities Planning professional, overseeing the Library's Facilities & Procurement Department, including management of furniture and equipment at 41 locations and programs. I help to implement long range plans for capital programs. I inform and counsel senior staff related to facilities use, and plans for new and remodeled facilities. I collaborate with city/county/state/federal authorities related to code compliance and joint ventures/developments. I advise site/program administrators related to facilities improvements and site development. I am responsible for coordinating the installation of the Library's Automatic Materials Handling systems (AMH).

Steven Braun is the Informatics/Data Services Specialist in the University of Minnesota Health Sciences Libraries. He received his B.A. (2011) in chemistry and Asian studies from St. Olaf College and his M.S. (2013) in molecular biophysics and biochemistry from Yale University. His work and interests involve the theory and practice of data visualization, systems-level informatics and data analytics, and theoretical frameworks for working with and representing data in both research and administrative settings. As a web developer, he sustains interest in design and implementation of web applications that better facilitate workflows for academic assessment, teaching, and learning. As a former Fulbright Fellow and speaker of Japanese, he seeks out unique opportunities for creative work at the intersection of language, informatics, and education.

H. Dan Ament
Planning, disciplined savings and prudent investment management are key tenets when striving for a successful financial future. Relying on more than two decades of experience, Dan and his team assist their clients in accomplishing these goals by prudently managing their financial affairs. Dan has been a financial contributor to NBC Affiliate KARE-11 for 15 years; providing weekly commentary related to the spectrum of personal finance topics. He is a graduate of the University of St. Thomas with a BA in Finance, where he developed his interest in the financial services industry. Equal to his passion for serving clients, he values time with his wife and three children. His interests include coaching youth hockey, watching his children participate in various activities and enjoying the MN outdoors hunting, boating and fishing. His community service includes serving on the investment committee for the Ronald McDonald House Charities, working to support and promote NPH – USA an organization caring for abandoned and neglected children in nine Latin American countries and a past board member for the Orono Foundation for Education.

I. Mary Blissenbach, Margie Schuster, and Jessica Mattson
Mary: "I work as a Library Assistant in Archives and Special Collections. I have been a student supervisor for 13 years. My experience includes hiring, scheduling, project planning and work flow, training new workers for tasks, and budget payroll monitoring. I have had some training on generational differences in the work place too. "

Margie: Margie works for Hennepin County Libraries as a volunteer coordinator for staff working with volunteers.

Jessica: Jessica works in Wilson Library at the University of Minnesota as a supervisor for student workers in the Access and Information Services department.

J. Sidney Pharis
Dr. Sidney Pharis is a board certified Naturopathic Doctor trained in family practice, providing care to patients of all ages. She earned her degree in Naturopathic Medicine from National University of Health Sciences in Lombard, Illinois, and currently practices in the Twin Cities. In addition to working with many chronic health conditions, she is passionate about preventative care and building the foundation of health within the pediatric population. Additional specialties include women’s health, hormonal imbalances, gastrointestinal health, thyroid disorders, and autoimmunity. She is committed to educating and empowering her patients on how to live healthy and fulfilled lives, and provides each patient with the necessary tools to do so. Dr. Pharis currently sees patients at SuNu Wellness Center and Wellness Minneapolis.

L. Donald Clay Johnson
Dr. Donald Clay Johnson served as Curator, Ames Library of South Asia of the University of Minnesota until his retirement. In 2011 the Goldstein Museum of Design had an exhibition of some of the textiles in his collection. Dr. Johnson actively speaks on and writes about Indian textiles, most recently he taught a course on them for the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute of the University of Minnesota.

M. Keri Huber
Keri Huber has worked at the Minnesota State Fair as an archivist for the past six years. With over 22,000 photos in the State Fair’s collection, her background in visual arts has proven useful in finding images that tell a story and bring history to life. She collaborates with the Minnesota Historical Society (History Walking Tour and the State Fair’s History & Heritage Center) and has worked with TPT (Lost Twin Cities; Almanac; Gracious Spaces: Clarence H. Johnston, Minnesota Architect) and national programs such as Bizarre Foods with Andrew Zimmern. She has been interviewed by local television and radio stations and newspapers about the State Fair and enjoys sharing her knowledge of the State Fair through research and by the connections she has made.

N. Robert Cudinski
Robert “Ski” Cudinski is an IT Professional working in the field of Network Security, working for companies like Secure Computing, McAfee and Intel for over 15 years. He has been interested in 3D Printing for a number of years and owns and operates several models of 3D printers. As an enthusiastic fan of this technology, he has talked a bunch of people’s ears off and given demonstrations at local schools.

P. Mike Sutliff
Mike Sutliff is a 14-year employee of the University Libraries currently working as the Director of Computer Support. His career with the Libraries started as a Computer Support technician dealing with the day-to-day management of all computer hardware and software problems. Advancing to Server Administrator brought new challenges in the ways of security, backups, access, and due process. He then spent a year at Bio-Med as the interim IT Supervisor, returned to Wilson to continue his IT supervisory role for the West Zone, and is now responsible for the entire Computer Support department as Director.

R. Linda Greve
Linda Greve is the Assistant to the University Librarian for Outreach and Grants. She has over 40 years experience in advertising, marketing, and business development for a broad range of business segments. In her tenure at the University, the Libraries' have submitted over 40 proposals with a 72% success rate. Prior to joining the Libraries, she worked in development and outreach for the Loft Literary Center.

S. Jen Tantzen
Jen Tantzen has been with the University Libraries since 1996 when she started as a student and has been working with the libraries' web presence ever since, currently working in Wilson Library as a front end developer. In the summer of 2014, she took a month away from her desk for an intensive course to gain her yoga teaching certification and now moonlights as a yoga instructor at Invisible Bee Yoga in Minneapolis.

T. LeAnn Suchy & Heather Tompkins
LeAnn Suchy has worked in multiple different organizations since graduating with her MLIS in 2006. She currently works as the Educational Technology Librarian at St. Catherine University. One of her favorite apps is Pic Collage (and Pet Rescue Saga).

Heather Tompkins has been reference and instruction librarian at Carleton College since 2003 where she provides support for Humanities and digital scholarship. Her favorite app is Evernote and she loves puzzle apps like Cross Me and TripleTown.

V. Robin Thomson
I am the Curator of the University of Minnesota Insect Collection. I received my Ph.D. in Entomology from the University of Minnesota. Spring semesters, I teach Environmental Science & Society for the University Honors Program.

W. Del Reed, Kurt Meyer
Del Reed is Reference Services Coordinator at the Bio-Medical Library at the University of Minnesota.

Kurt Meyer is a Reference and Research Instruction Librarian and the Law Library of the University of Minnesota.

X. Lisa Vecoli
Lisa Vecoli is the curator of the Tretter Collection in Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Studies. The archive, originally the personal collection of Jean-Nickolaus Tretter, provides a record of GLBT thought, knowledge, and culture for current and future generations and is open to all users, free of charge.

Lisa has been involved with the archive since its inception in 2000 and was one of the founding members of the community Advisory Board. With the retirement of founder Jean Tretter, Lisa moved from board member to the staff role.

Since becoming the curator in 2012, Lisa has focused on adding missing voices to the archive. She has prioritized the inclusion of material from communities of color, transgender/gender queer individuals and bi/pan/omni/fluid communities.

In her spare time, Lisa adds to her personal library which currently contains 3,000 contemporary works of lesbian fiction and over 1,100 lesbian pulps.