Community-Based Participatory Research:
A Partnership Approach For Public Health

Additional Contributors to the Instruction

Wilma Brakefield-Caldwell received her BS in nursing from Wayne State University and worked for 28 years with the Detroit Department of Health and Wellness Promotion. During her time there, she worked as a public health nurse and supervisor, a project coordinator, a public health nursing administrator, and health care administrator. In the latter capacity, Ms. Brakefield-Caldwell served as the Detroit Department of Health and Wellness Promotion representative to and was a founding member of the Detroit Community-Academic Urban Research Center Board. Ms. Brakefield-Caldwell retired in 1998 but continues to serve as a community representative on the Community Action Against Asthma Steering Committee. She frequently co-presents at local and national conferences and workshops and has co-authored several articles on CBPR projects.

J. Ricardo Guzman, MSW, MPH
, is the Chief Executive Officer and founding member of Community Health and Social Services Center, Inc. (CHASS). CHASS is a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) with three locations in the city of Detroit, which provide health care to underserved residents (primarily Latino and low income). Mr. Guzman is a long-standing community leader and activist in southwest Detroit. He has played a leadership role in increasing access to culturally appropriate, high-quality, affordable, comprehensive health services for community members who historically have not had access to such services. Mr. Guzman also is an influential member of the National Association of Community Health Centers and is a recipient of the National Hispanic Health Leadership Award. He is also a founding and current Board member of the Detroit Community-Academic Urban Research Center (URC) and is the Director of the URC-affiliated REACH Detroit Partnership, for which CHASS is the lead agency. He frequently co-presents at local and national conferences and workshops and has co-authored several articles on CBPR projects.

Edith (Edie) C. Kieffer, PhD, is Associate Professor and Research Associate Professor in the School of Social Work, University of Michigan. She received a PhD in medical geography and a MPH in maternal and child health and health services administration and planning, both from the University of Hawaii. Dr. Kieffer's research interests include using a CBPR approach to understand and address ethnic and geographic disparities in health including diabetes, obesity and pregnancy outcomes. In collaboration with Detroit community members and organizations, she is developing and implementing multi-level interventions designed to promote healthy eating and regular exercise among Latino and African-American residents of southwest and eastside Detroit, including pregnant and postpartum women. Dr. Kieffer has extensive experience planning and conducting training and technical assistance workshops on a variety of topics,including using CBPR methods to plan and implement interventions. She has also conducted extensive quantitative and qualitative research on the prevalence and correlates of infant feeding practices, birth weight, infant mortality, obesity, and diabetes. She is currently Principal Investigator of the Reach Detroit Partnership, Mothers Moving to a Healthy Future, Healthy Mothers on the Move, and Physical Activity Promotion Materials for Pregnant Latino and African American Women, and is a member of the Detroit Community-Academic Urban Research CenterBoard. 

Richard Lichtenstein, PhD, MPH, is Associate Professor in Health Management and Policy at the University of Michigan School of Public Health. He received both his MPH and PhD from the University of Michigan in medical care organization, and a BS from Cornell University in industrial and labor relations. Dr. Lichtenstein has taught graduate courses on the U.S. Health Care System for nearly 30 years, and has expertise in access to care, health disparities, government financing programs, and CBPR. Dr. Lichtenstein is Co-Director of the Detroit URC, and served as Principal Investigator of the Eastside Access Partnership, a URC-affiliated project that aimed to enroll uninsured low-income children in Medicaid and in the state's CHIP Program. This project used an innovative learning tool and Freirian empowerment methods to support parents to enroll their children in state-run health coverage programs. He is also working on CBPR projects related to discrimination in the health care system. Dr. Lichtenstein is Director of the Summer Enrichment Program in Health Administration, which recruits undergraduate students interested in eliminating health disparities to the field of public health. He is also the founding and current Director of the University of Michigan School of Public Health training site for the Kellogg Health Scholars Program Community Track, a post-doctoral program in CBPR.

Murlisa Lockett, MA, is Assistant Community Health Coordinator at the Detroit Department of Health and Wellness Promotion and is a member of the Healthy Environments Partnership Steering Committee. She coordinated the East Side Village Health Worker Partnership (1996-2004) lay health advisor program, affiliated with the Detroit URC, which worked in Detroit's eastside communities. Among other interventions, the program oversaw the development of mini-markets that brought healthy produce into areas of Detroit with few retail outlets providing healthy foods. Ms. Lockett also served as Project Manager for the Healthy Connections program.  She frequently co-presents at local and national conferences and workshops and has co-authored several articles on CBPR projects.

Gloria Palmisano, MA, holds a Bachelor degree in Nutrition and Food Science and a Masters degree in Community Counseling and Development. Mrs. Palmisano's career has included over 30 years experience in program implementation related to public health, education, and employment and training, all of which contributed greatly to increasing services to underserved populations. Since 2001, Mrs. Palmisano has served as the Project Manager for the REACH Detroit Partnership, which addresses racial and ethnic health disparities among African American and Latino residents of Detroit with, or at risk for, type-2 diabetes. Mrs. Palmisano has successfully developed and coordinated a comprehensive training program for Community Health Workers (CHWs); positioned REACH staff in local, regional, state and national efforts related to REACH Detroit objectives; and contributed greatly to maintaining and sustaining the REACH Detroit Partnership. As a result of her contributions to the dissemination of the partnership’s work, Ms. Palmisano has developed a national reputation as a steadfast advocate for the recognition and adequate compensation of CHWs. She has also promoted the use of a CHW model and community-based participatory approach to eliminating health disparities and has increased the linkages and other collaborative efforts that further the work of the REACH Detroit Partnership. 

Edith Parker, DrPH, MPH, is Associate Professor of Health Behavior and Health Education at the University of Michigan School of Public Health, where she joined the faculty in 1995. In July 2005, she became Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at the University of Michigan School of Public Health. She received her MPH and DrPH degrees from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She has authored or co-authored more than forty journal articles and book chapters about lay health advisers, community capacity and related areas. She has over fifteen years’ research experience in the development, implementation, and evaluation of community-based participatory interventions to improve health status. Her current research is focused primarily in Detroit, where she is involved in community-based participatory research projects focusing on women's and children's health, childhood asthma, and issues of environmental justice. Dr. Parker's work also focuses on methods of better understanding and operationalizing measures of community social dynamics, such as community capacity and community competence. She is recognized for her expertise in CBPR and in evidence-based planning and intervention design and has served as a consultant and instructor on workshops focusing on CBPR and evidence-based program planning for prevention, including the CDC- funded Preventing Violence Through Education, Networking and Technical Assistance (PREVENT), a component of the National Initiative for Injury and Violence Prevention (NTI). Dr. Parker is currently the Principal Investigator for the Community Action Against Asthma Intervention project and is a member of the Detroit Community-Academic Urban Research Center Board.

Angela G. Reyes, MPH, is founder and Executive Director of Detroit Hispanic Development Corporation, which aims to empower communities by providing human services and community development projects, primarily in southwest Detroit, through opportunities for employment, education, and healthy lifestyles. She is a founding and current member of the URC Board, and the CAAA and HEP Steering Committees. Ms. Reyes has over 30 years experience working on community-based programs in the Latino community in southwest Detroit, including the Council Against Gang-Related Violence. She has successfully advocated for changes in the police and recreation departments and has been the recipient of several awards for her community work. Ms. Reyes has helped develop curriculum for and co-presented with URC faculty and community partners at numerous national, regional and local CBPR training and capacity building workshops and meetings, and has co-authored several articles on CBPR.

Zachary Rowe, BBA, is Executive Director for Friends of Parkside and a founding and current Board member of the Detroit URC. Friends of Parkside is a grassroots community-based organization on Detroit's eastside which provides programs and services for youth, a computer learning center, health and safety projects, and linkages for residents to employment and personal enrichment opportunities. Mr. Rowe is a member of several Steering Committees for URC-affiliated partnerships including REACH Detroit Partnership, Healthy Environments Partnership, and Community Action Against Asthma. He has co-authored manuscripts, helped develop CBPR curriculum, and co-presented with URC faculty and community partners at numerous national, regional and local CBPR training and capacity building workshops and meetings. 

Maria Salinas, BA, has been active in leadership and community development in southwest Detroit for over 25 years. Ms. Salinas has served on the Local Advisory Councils for the Detroit International River Crossing (DIRC) and Detroit Intermodal Transfer Facility (DIFT) and as a Board Member of the Southwest Detroit Environmental Vision (SDEV). She is currently a Board member of Community Health and Social Services Center, Inc. (CHASS) and ARISE DETROIT. Ms. Salinas served as the Field Coordinator for Community Action Against Asthma from 1998-2005. Currently, she is employed by the National Community Development Institute (NCDI) and is the Senior Program Associate for The Skillman Foundation’s Good Neighborhoods Initiative in Detroit. Ms. Salinas is a 2008 Graduate of the two-year degree program “Great Lakes Leadership Academy” at Michigan State University, earning a degree in Agriculture, Manufacturing and Natural Resources, which allows her to advocate for the State of Michigan in those fields.  Ms. Salinas has co-authored manuscripts, helped develop CBPR curriculum, and co-presented with URC faculty and community partners at numerous national, regional and local CBPR training and capacity building workshops and meetings.

Amy J. Schulz, PhD, MPH, is an Associate Professor of Health Behavior and Health Education at the School of Public Health, University of Michigan, where she joined the faculty in 1997. She is  also Research Associate Professor at the Institute for Research on  Women and Gender, Associate Director for the Center for Research on  Ethnicity, Culture and Health, and Co-Director for the NIH funded  "Promoting Ethnic Diversity in Public Health."  She received her PhD in Sociology and MPH in Health Behavior and Health Education from the University of Michigan. Her research focuses on social determinants of health in urban communities, with a particular focus on the social and physical environments as they mediate relationships between race,  socioeconomic position, and health outcomes. She has nearly 20 years  experience in this field and has authored or coauthored more than  fifty journal articles and book chapters on the development,  implementation, and evaluation of community-based partnerships, social determinants of health, and related issues. She serves as Principal Investigator for the Healthy Environments Partnership, funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and the National Center for Minority Health and Health Disparities. She also serves as a Board member for the Detroit Community-Academic Urban Research Center. She was the Principal Investigator for the East Side Village Health Worker Partnership and the Co-Principal Investigator for Promoting Healthy Eating in Detroit. Dr. Schulz teaches several graduate level courses at the SPH, including a course on environmental health promotion and one on survey research methods. She has designed, conducted and evaluated numerous workshops and educational activities throughout the U.S. and internationally, and frequently provides technical assistance in the use of CBPR approaches in intervention research.