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Welcome.  This is the web portal for a National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded project to support the development and widespread dissemination of a contemporary operating systems course in an undergraduate computer science curriculum.  The project is a collaboration between the Computer Science departments of the University of Dayton and Wright State University.  Details of the course content are provided on the "Modules & Labs" page.  Project-related publications are located on the "Publications" page, and associated presentation materials are located on the "Resources" page.

About the Project

This is a collaborative project that addresses the critical need to prepare students for the contemporary information technology landscape. The project will develop a new operating systems course that will play a central role in the curriculum of computer science and engineering undergraduate degree programs. The new course will resolve significant issues of misalignment between existing computer science courses on operating systems and employee professional skills and knowledge requirements. It has the potential to better engage students in active learning, create computer science learning environments that improve student-learning outcomes, and broaden participation in STEM education and employment. It will serve national interests by preparing students more effectively for post-baccalaureate employment where expertise in distributed mobile and parallel computation, big data analytics, and cybersecurity is increasingly necessary and in demand.

Project Goals

The goals of this project are threefold. 
  1. It will design a contemporary operating systems curriculum and pedagogy model that incorporates cybersecurity, mobile OS and the Internet of Things, concurrent programming and synchronization, cloud computing and big data processing, 
  2. The project will evaluate the effect of the model on student learning, retention, growth, and job placement, as well as faculty and STEM/CS education research community engagement. 
  3. It will build a community-of-practice among computer science faculty at multiple institutions that adopt or adapt the model for their own academic contexts. 
Materials and results will be shared with the faculty community-of-practice continuously to help improve the course. 

Project Investigators

University of Dayton:
Wright State University:

Funding

This project has been funded through two NSF grant awards:

  1. Collaborative Research: Engaged Student Learning: Re-conceptualizing and Evaluating a Core Computer Science Course for Active Learning and STEM Student Success. NSF IUSE. $218,556. August 15, 2017 to July 31, 2020. Award number 1712406.
  2. Collaborative Research: Engaged Student Learning: Re-conceptualizing and Evaluating a Core Computer Science Course for Active Learning and STEM Student Success. NSF IUSE. $81,308. August 15, 2017 to July 31, 2020. Award number 1712404.

Disclaimer
This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Numbers 1712406 and  1712404.
Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.