Course‎ > ‎

Hope & the Helping Relationship Syllabus

HOPE AND THE HELPING RELATIONSHIP

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 446/546

Winter 2014 – Tuesdays 5-8 pm

 

Instructor: Dr. Denise J. Larsen, R. Psych.

Office: 6-123E Education North                                 

Phone: (780) 492-5897                                              

Email: denise.larsen@ualberta.ca (quickest response time)                  

        UofAHopeClass@gmail.com (for reading synopsis)     

Office Hours: TBA                                                    

 

General Information

This course looks closely at hope as a concept and examines its influence and role in professional helping interactions such as counselling, education, and other professional settings. Hope is a vital and foundational aspect of human experience and growth. Literature drawn primarily from the fields of counselling psychology, education, and health care provide a multidisciplinary foundation for this course. This literature focuses primarily on hope and related relationship skills in applied settings, e.g., counsellor-client relationships, teacher-student-parent relationships, collegial working relationships, and self-care.  Students will obtain foundational knowledge of hope research, theory, and practice and will spend additional energy and time on an area of their own specific professional interest. This is a lively and interactive course where students will learn research-supported principles and practices for working with hope in applied settings. 

Objectives

Upon completing this course, students will be able to:

     1.  a. describe hope from several theoretical perspectives and its researched influence

b. use research to describe the relationship between hope and various related concepts (optimism, goals, self-efficacy, motivation)

c. offer an informed critique of research on hope across disciplines

d. discuss implications of hope research on interactions between professional and client/student and on program planning

2. identify and practice a variety of research-informed and practice-informed hope enhancing techniques that can be intentionally utilized in working with clients/students, including:

     - conversational and narrative-based approaches

     -cognitive behavioral approaches

     -non-verbal/arts-based approaches

3. explicitly reflect (through structured reflective practice) on personal experiences that inform their understandings of hope and how this may/can influence and inform their professional practice

4. read scholarship on hope and professional practice and be able to discuss ways of applying this to their own work life including in challenging working contexts

 


 

Course Design

 

The course provides a strong emphasis on hope practice, especially within counselling and teaching settings. A variety of teaching and learning approaches will be used to explore the role of hope within educational, counselling (and to a lesser extent other health care settings). The course begins with a strong focus on theory and research. Primary sources form the required reading for the course and are drawn from counselling, education, and healthcare. Explicit links between theory and research are then integrated into practice in this experiential course.

 

This course is not structured within a traditional lecture format. As a member of the class, there will be times when you are required to take an active role in your learning through group discussion and experiential activities. This means that students are expected to prepare for each seminar and to participate in class discussions. Students are graded on their contributions to the class. As an instructor, I take my responsibility to foster a safe, supportive, engaging, and rich learning environment. In largest measure, the richness and depth of your learning experience will be proportional to your investment in the course and your contributions to the learning environment of the classroom.

 

Ethical issues of safety and willingness to share and risk are addressed in the design of this course. A key aspect of the course will be the learning environment created amongst class members. It is an environment that can support a richness of learning through sharing and debriefing. Reflective learning conversations will occur in different ways throughout the course including in small and larger group formats. Students are reminded that the degree of sharing is always their individual choice. Students are encouraged to share experiences only to the degree that they are comfortable.

 

Assignments and Evaluation

 

EDPY 446  - Undergraduate course evaluation consists of the following:

 

Class Preparation and Participation (20%)

446 Project #1 Reflective case study of hope in prof. and/or personal life (30%)

                        Due: February 11, 2014

446 Project #2 Part A Literature Review: professional setting (20%) Due: Mar. 18, 2014

     Part B Application of hope in professional setting (30%) Due: April 8, 2014

 

There is no final examination for this course.

 

EDPY 546 – Graduate course evaluation consists of the following:

         

Class Preparation and Participation (20%)

546 Project #1 Reflective case study of hope in prof. and/or personal life (30%)

              Due: February 11, 2014

546 Project #2 Group theory presentation (20%) Due: February 4, 2014

546 Project #3 Theory/research supported application of hope in prof. setting (30%)

                             Or

                         Hope focused research proposal

                         Due: April 8, 2014

 

There is no final examination for this course.

 

Required Reading (click for full reading list)

 

As found on Moodle:  Required Reading List with persistent links

 

Jevne, R.F., & Miller, J. (1999). Finding hope: Seeing the world in a brighter light. Fort Wayne, Indiana: Willowgreen Publishing. In Coutts Reserve Reading Room

 

FINAL GRADES

Final grades are reported using letter grades (unless the course is credit/non-credit).  Final grades are determined after combining term scores and the final examination and/or final paper scores, and then a grade is assigned in accordance with the University of Alberta Marking and Grading Guidelines presented in the GFC Policy Manual (http://www.uofaweb.ualberta.ca/gfcpolicymanual/policymanualsection61-6.cfm).

 

Grading in Undergraduate Courses

         

Grading

In Undergraduate Courses

Descriptors

Letter Grade

Point Value

Excellent

A+

4.0

 

A

4.0

 

A-

3.7

Good

B+

3.3

 

B

3.0

 

B-

2.7

Satisfactory

C+

2.3

 

C

2.0

 

C-

1.7

Poor

D+

1.3

Minimal Pass

D

1.0

Failure

F

0

 

Undergraduate Mean grades will usually fall in the following ranges:

 

Level

200

300

400

 

2.73 – 2.92

2.92 – 3.06

3.06 – 3.16

 

Average: 2.83

Average: 3.00

Average: 3.11

 

Grading in Graduate Courses

 

Grading

In Graduate Courses

Descriptors

Letter Grade

Point Value

Excellent

A+

4.0

 

A

4.0

 

A-

3.7

Good

B+

3.3

 

B

3.0

Satisfactory

B-

2.7

 

C+

2.3

Failure

C

2.0

 

C-

1.7

 

D+

1.3

 

D

1.0

 

F

0.0

EQUALITY, EQUITY AND RESPECT

The Faculty of Education is committed to providing an environment of equality and respect for all people within the university community, and to educating faculty, staff and students in developing teaching and learning contexts that are welcoming to all.  The faculty recommends that staff and students use inclusive language to create classroom atmosphere in which students’ experiences and views are treated with equal respect and value in relation to their gender, racial background, sexual orientation and ethnic backgrounds.  In order to create a thoughtful and respectful community, you are encouraged to use gender-neutral or gender-inclusive language and to become more sensitive to the impact of devaluing language.

PLAGIARISM AND CHEATING

“The University of Alberta is committed to the highest standards of academic integrity and honesty.  Students are expected to be familiar with these standards regarding academic honesty and to uphold the policies of the University in this respect.  Students are particularly urged to familiarize themselves with the provisions of the Code of Student Behaviour (online at http://www.uofaweb.ualberta.ca/gfcpolicymanual/content.cfm?ID_page=37633) and avoid any behaviour which could potentially result in suspicions of cheating, plagiarism, misrepresentation of facts and/or participation in an offence.  Academic dishonesty is a serious offence and can result in suspension or expulsion from the University.” (GFC 29 SEP 2003)

SPECIALIZED SUPPORT & STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

Students who require accommodations in this course due to a disability affecting mobility, vision, hearing, learning, mental or physical health are advised to discuss their needs with Specialized Support and Disability Services, 2-800 Students’ Union Building, 492-3381 (phone) or 492-7269 (TTY).

COURSE OUTLINE CONTENT

“Policy about course outlines can be found in Section 23.4(2) of the University Calendar.” (GFC 29 SEP 2003)