Anthropology Courses

This Course Guide (below) contains detailed information on all Anthropology courses, and links to the catalogue with Course Outlines where available. See Bear Tracks (subject: ANTHR) for specific time and location information organized by term. The University of Alberta Calendar is the only authoritative source of the rules and regulations that apply to students. Graduate students can contact Heather Cook and undergraduate students can contact Gayeung Doan for more information.

Anthro Topics Course list 2016-17

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Contents

  1. 1 Undergraduate Courses
    1. 1.1 ANTHR 101 Introductory Anthropology
    2. 1.2 ANTHR 110 Gender, Age, and Culture
    3. 1.3 ANTHR 150 Race and Racism
    4. 1.4 ANTHR 206 Introduction to Archaeology
    5. 1.5 ANTHR 207 Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology
    6. 1.6 ANTHR 208 Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology
    7. 1.7 ANTHR 209 Introduction to Biological Anthropology
    8. 1.8 ANTHR 219 World Prehistory
    9. 1.9 ANTHR 230 Anthropology of Science, Technology, and Environment
    10. 1.10 ANTHR 235 Anthropology of Disability
    11. 1.11 ANTHR 256 Alberta Archaeology
    12. 1.12 ANTHR 286 Topics in Regional Anthropology
    13. 1.13 ANTHR 287 Topics in Asian Anthropology
    14. 1.14 ANTHR 310 The Anthropology of Gender
    15. 1.15 ANTHR 311 North American Prehistory
    16. 1.16 ANTHR 312 Lower Paleolithic Prehistory
    17. 1.17 ANTHR 313 Middle and Upper Paleolithic Prehistory
    18. 1.18 ANTHR 318 Political Anthropology
    19. 1.19 ANTHR 320 Anthropology of Religion
    20. 1.20 ANTHR 321 Religions of China in Practice
    21. 1.21 ANTHR 322 Anthropological Perspectives on Discursive Practices
    22. 1.22 ANTHR 324 Economic Anthropology
    23. 1.23 ANTHR 332 Anthropology of Science
    24. 1.24 ANTHR 350 Kinship and Social Structure
    25. 1.25 ANTHR 372 Anthropology of Food
    26. 1.26 ANTHR 385 Topics in Social Cultural Anthropology
    27. 1.27 ANTHR 386 Topics in Archaeological or Biological Anthropology
    28. 1.28 ANTHR 390 Human Osteology
    29. 1.29 ANTHR 391 Hominid Evolution
    30. 1.30 ANTHR 393 Health and Healing
    31. 1.31 ANTHR 396 Archaeological Field Training
    32. 1.32 ANTHR 397 Anthropological Field Training
    33. 1.33 ANTHR 401 Ethnographic Methods
    34. 1.34 ANTHR 407 Paleopathology
    35. 1.35 ANTHR 415 History of Anthropological Theory
    36. 1.36 ANTHR 417 Anthropology of Modernity
    37. 1.37 ANTHR 420 Anthropology and the Twentieth Century
    38. 1.38 ANTHR 424 Visual Anthropology
    39. 1.39 ANTHR 443 Juvenile Osteology
    40. 1.40 ANTHR 460 Nutritional Anthropology
    41. 1.41 ANTHR 464 Chemical Analysis of Bone
    42. 1.42 ANTHR 468 Fundamentals of Archaeological Mapping
    43. 1.43 ANTHR 469 Dental Anthropology
    44. 1.44 ANTHR 471 Readings in Anthropology
    45. 1.45 ANTHR 472 Independent Research
    46. 1.46 ANTHR 474 Northwest Coast Societies from an Anthropological Perspective
    47. 1.47 ANTHR 476 Palaeodietary Reconstruction
    48. 1.48 ANTHR 477 Northwest Coast Archaeology
    49. 1.49 ANTHR 480 Zooarchaeology
    50. 1.50 ANTHR 481 Development of Anthropological Archaeology
    51. 1.51 ANTHR 484 Topics in Archaeology and/or Biological Anthropology
    52. 1.52 ANTHR 485 Topics in Social, Cultural and/or Linguistic Anthropology
    53. 1.53 ANTHR 486 Seminar in Archaeology and/or Biological Anthropology
    54. 1.54 ANTHR 487 Seminar in Social and Cultural Anthropology
    55. 1.55 ANTHR 490 Human Osteoarchaeology
    56. 1.56 ANTHR 491 Stone Tools
    57. 1.57 ANTHR 494 Forensic Anthropology
    58. 1.58 ANTHR 495 Archaeological Methods
    59. 1.59 ANTHR 498 History of Biological Anthropology
    60. 1.60 ANTHR 499 Honors Seminar and Research Project
  2. 2 Graduate Courses
    1. 2.1 ANTHR 500 MA Thesis Prospectus
    2. 2.2 ANTHR 501 MA Colloquium
    3. 2.3 ANTHR 504 Advanced Mortuary Archaeology
    4. 2.4 ANTHR 511 Ethnographic Field Methods
    5. 2.5 ANTHR 517 Anthropology of Modernity
    6. 2.6 ANTHR 520 Anthropology and the Twentieth Century
    7. 2.7 ANTHR 524 Visual Anthropology
    8. 2.8 ANTHR 543 Advanced Juvenile Osteology
    9. 2.9 ANTHR 560 Advanced Nutritional Anthropology
    10. 2.10 ANTHR 564 Advanced Chemical Analysis of Bone
    11. 2.11 ANTHR 568 Fundamentals of Archaeological Mapping
    12. 2.12 ANTHR 569 Dental Anthropology
    13. 2.13 ANTHR 571 Advanced Readings in Anthropology
    14. 2.14 ANTHR 572 Independent Research
    15. 2.15 ANTHR 573 Advanced Field Training
    16. 2.16 ANTHR 576 Advanced Palaeodietary Reconstruction
    17. 2.17 ANTHR 577 Northwest Coast Archaeology
    18. 2.18 ANTHR 580 Advanced Zooarchaeology
    19. 2.19 ANTHR 584 Topics in Archaeology and/or Biological Anthropology
    20. 2.20 ANTHR 585 Topics in Social, Cultural and/or Linguistic Anthropology
    21. 2.21 ANTHR 586 Seminar in Archaeology and/or Biological Anthropology
    22. 2.22 ANTHR 587 Seminar in Social and Cultural Anthropology
    23. 2.23 ANTHR 591 Advanced Study of Stone Tools
    24. 2.24 ANTHR 593 Evolution and Social Life
    25. 2.25 ANTHR 598 Landscape and Culture
    26. 2.26 ANTHR 600 PhD Thesis Prospectus
    27. 2.27 ANTHR 601 PhD Colloquium

Undergraduate Courses

ANTHR 101 Introductory Anthropology

Schedule

Approaches to the study of Anthropology through the study of human biological, cultural and linguistic diversity, past and present.

ANTHR 110 Gender, Age, and Culture

Schedule

Brent Hammer

What does it mean to be female, male, middle-aged or old? This introductory course examines the cultural construction of the categories of gender and age to see how these ideas vary cross-culturally and how they influence our ideas of normal behavior.

ANTHR 150 Race and Racism

Schedule

Francois Larose

Sandra Garvie-Lok

Turn on the TV or go online and you’ll find race everywhere, from demonstrations protesting racism to fictional investigators confidently identifying the race of a murder victim. Race has such a strong social presence that many people are surprised to hear that its’s only a few centuries old as a concept, and not a particularly effective way to look at human physical variation. This course starts by looking at how and why humans vary physically from place to place and how the race concept developed as an attempt to explain this variation. We then move on to look at race as a social category and the challenge of racism in modern societies. 

Lesley Harrington

The challenge of racism in modern societies and the response of anthropology, including the history of how the ‘race’ concept has been used to explain human variation.

ANTHR 206 Introduction to Archaeology

Kisha Supernant

This course is a general introduction to the history, methods, and theoretical approaches used in archaeology. It focuses on the relationship between the archaeological record, reconstructions of the past, archaeological methods, and the challenges of archaeological explanation. While not a survey of world history, this course will draw on examples from around the world to explore the practice of archaeology and critically evaluate the process of archaeological interpretation. We will also examine the ways in which archaeology is portrayed in popular culture. The structure of the course includes lectures and hands-on lab activities.

Jan Olson

An introduction to the methods and theoretical approaches used by prehistoric archaeologists, using both lectures and labs. Topics discussed include the goals and objectives of archaeology, the methods used in data collection and analysis, and procedures.

ANTHR 207 Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology

Kathleen Lowrey

This course introduces students to the history and present prospects of the field of socio-cultural anthropology. By the end of the course students should have a good understanding of the historical development of the discipline, be confidently and knowledgeably able to follow its current intellectual debates and controversies, and have an emergent sense of which sub-fields of the discipline most interest them.  This class can thus serve as a terminal introduction to socio-cultural anthropology, or the basis for a greater engagement with it.

Gregory Forth

Comparative study of human society and culture, particularly non-Western communities, with special attention to the family, social structure, economics and political institutions, and religion; processes of change.

ANTHR 208 Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology

Andie Palmer

This course provides an introduction to the tools and techniques of linguistic anthropology, and allows students to refine their observational skills and abilities to analyze the cultural conventions of human communication. Critical understandings of how individuals’ differing perceptions of the same phenomena are influenced by language and culture will be developed through preliminary training in phonology, and explorations of the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis. Key readings in linguistic anthropology should foster an understanding of issues of language ideology, language and power, language and gender, the ethnography of speaking, artistry in speech, language endangerment, and child language acquisition. Students will conduct a small research project based on their own observational fieldwork as part of the course.

Joseph Hill

Linguistic Anthropology is the subfield of anthropology that studies how language and communication work in human societies. This course explores several questions: What do we mean when we say “language” or “a language”? How does language make us who we are and the world what it is? How does language “mean” and “do” things? How can language marginalize, empower, differentiate, inspire, advocate, and so on? This course combines discussions of readings from linguistic anthropologists, sociolinguistics, and theorists of language with assignments requiring students to transcribe and analyze actual speech. Students will learn to apply an anthropological approach to thinking about and analyzing language. They will learn to approach it not merely as a system of sounds for communicating but as a central part of the experience of self and other, social context, political struggle, and any human undertaking.

ANTHR 209 Introduction to Biological Anthropology

Schedule

Francois Larose

This course provides an introduction to biological anthropology through an overview of human evolution, adaptation and variation. Human evolution will be approached through the current evidence from the fossil record and primatology. Human adaption will be discussed by examining biological and behavioural responses to environmental stresses in living and past populations. Our look at human variation will consider modern human physical variation in the light of adaptation, population genetics and culture.  Other topics discussed will include the history and principles of evolutionary theory and the methods used to reconstruct our earliest ancestors from fossil remains. The laboratory component of the course includes a detailed look at human skeletal anatomy, as well as a hands-on survey  or the fossil evidence for our evolutionary past.

Pamela Mayne Correia

Human evolution, human disease and health, identification of individuals from their skeleton, biological adaptations to various environments are all part of this exploration into Biological Anthropology.  By comparing the anatomy of modern humans to one another, and to non-human primates, and to those ancestral species of our lineage, we begin an exploration into human variation, cultural impacts on our anatomy and modern research directions.  Students will participate in an interactive laboratory component in which they will meet examples of members of the human lineage, compare our skeletons with other primates, and learn to identify each of the bones of the skeleton. 

This introductory exploration covers topics including human evolution, the study of past human diets and health, the identification of individuals from their skeleton, and how our species adapts biologically to various environments. By comparing modern humans to one another, to modern non-human primates and to fossil primates, we begin an exploration into human variation, the impact of our culture on our bodies, and current research into topics ranging from when our ancestors first stood upright to why only some people can digest milk. Some of this learning will be in lectures, but you will also participate in a weekly interactive lab in which you will examine fossil members of the human lineage, compare our skeletons with those of other primates, and learn to identify the bones of the skeleton.

ANTHR 219 World Prehistory


Pamela Willoughby

This course explores the long-term biological and cultural history of humans from a global perspective using the archaeological record. It begins 6 to 7 million years ago with the earliest hominid ancestors in Africa.  Then it deals with the Paleolithic and the origins and early evolution of culture during the Pleistocene.  The end of the ice ages sees the origins of food production and the development of pastoralism and/or agriculture.  The course then deals with the emergence of the world's earliest cities and state-level societies, including their use of monumental architecture, divine rule, and various forms of social control. The course is intended for those with no background in archaeology and is designed to be partially a narrative of human history as well as a brief review of some of the key techniques and theories of the discipline.

ANTHR 230 Anthropology of Science, Technology, and Environment


Marko Zivkovic

Science as a cultural practice, cultural effects and globalization of technology, changing views of nature, gender and science, traditional ecological knowledge, and the evolution of technology.

ANTHR 235 Anthropology of Disability

Schedule

Kathleen Lowrey

Disability is a universal human experience that until recently was rarely documented  within anthropology.  This course will use a mix of academic and activist literature to explore why this has been the case in the past and why this is now changing – so much so that “disability studies” is an expanding, even trendy, scholarly subfield.  We will examine standard models for understanding disability .  We will consider disability in cross-cultural and historical context. Finally, we will take up the profound challenge posed by disability itself to received ideas about agency, personhood, and dependency in modern global society. 

ANTHR 256 Alberta Archaeology

Schedule

John W. Ives

What was the late Ice Age world that First Nations ancestors initially encountered actually like? What was the first product to be used from the oil sands? When did the great communal bison hunts begin in Alberta? When does the archaeological record reveal traces of First Nations ceremonial activity in Alberta? Why are the Kootenay Plains called by that name? What is a serpent side-plate? If you would like to know the answers to these questions, these and many other topics will be covered in this treatment of the province’s archaeological record. We will review the archaeological sequence for Alberta, from the earliest traces of First Nations presence through to the Fur Trade era, looking at environments and important sites in the Plains, Boreal Forest, Parkland and Eastern Slopes regions. We will also discuss current issues in Alberta archaeology, among them regulatory processes, needs for consultation with First Nations, and balanced approaches to the formation of Alberta’s cultural landscapes. Students will be evaluated with a quiz, midterm and final exam, and a practical term project concerning Alberta artifacts. 

ANTHR 286 Topics in Regional Anthropology

Religion in the Middle East

Joseph Hill

The rising prominence of radical groups like the self-styled Islamic State has made it impossible for anyone to ignore the role of religion in the Middle East and its global effects. Yet public discourse in the West rarely goes beyond debating where to draw the line between dangerous religion and friendly religion that can be assimilated into a multicultural society. This course introduces students to some of the religious diversity of the Middle East and North Africa, especially different tendencies in Islam and Christianity. Students learn how anthropologists have thought about the relationships between religion and politics, gender, family, the self, and modernity in the region. We will question widespread notions of “religion,” the “secular” as its mere absence, and the “secularization” often assumed to accompany modernity. Ultimately, we aim to use anthropological thinking and methods to cultivate a more nuanced understanding of the place of what has come to be called “religion” in local communities and in a globalizing world. 

South America

Kathleen Lowrey

An introduction to South America’s diverse Amerindian cultures.  We begin with the traditional geographical / culture area classifications .  We will learn how anthropologists have shifted from topographical to historical accounts of native cultural diversity in South America.  Finally, we will consider the emergence of self-conscious and politically informed treatments of these same themes by South America’s indigenous peoples themselves. The course draws on physical anthropological and archaeological findings; the accounts of the first colonial adventurers, administrators, and missionaries to travel in South America from the 16th century onward; on documents produced by travelers and anthropologists from the 19th century to the present; and, finally, on literature written both by and about the participants in indigenous social and political movements across the twentieth century and up to the contemporary moment.  Students will gain a sense of the cultural richness and historical trajectory of the South American experience, and will be prepared to make informed comparisons about commonalities and differences within the American experience, North and South.

ANTHR 287 Topics in Asian Anthropology

Consult the Department and/or the schedule of classes for the specific topics offered. Variable content course which may be repeated if topic vary.

ANTHR 310 The Anthropology of Gender

Joseph Hill 

This course explores anthropological approaches to understanding sex and gender as they are understood in different societies and how gender intersects with culture, class, globalization, race and ethnicity. Gender concerns the social and cultural ideas and practices associated with biological sex distinction, or the contrast between men and women, masculinity and femininity, in any particular cultural context. Gender is inherently paradoxical: members of society experience gender oppositions as absolutely natural—perhaps even the most fundamental part of a person—yet what it means to be a man or a woman not only differs from society to society but is hard to define in any cultural context. This course examines several topics: the history of feminism and the study of sex and gender in anthropology; the mutual influence between cultural and scientific/medical concepts of sex and gender; the relationships between gender and colonialism, capitalism, globalization, ethnicity, and the state; gender metaphors that serve to describe domains other than sex; the construction of gendered identities and subjectivities; and gender identities and practices beyond heteronormative binaries. Students will learn to approach gender not as a specialization in anthropology but as a crucial dimension of any phenomenon we may want to understand and of any problem we may want to address. Prerequisites: ANTHR 110 or 207  or 209 or consent of Department.

ANTHR 311 North American Prehistory

John W. Ives

A survey of the archaeology of North America, from the earliest occupation of the continent to the time of European contact and colonization. We will consider how archaeologists gain knowledge about past societies and critically evaluate the theories and methods they use. In addition to a region-by-region survey, we will explore a number of issues that North American archaeologists are debating today: the peopling of the Americas; the nature and variation of hunter-gatherer societies; the origins and consequences of agriculture; the roots of social inequality; the emergence of complex societies; the collapse of cultural institutions; causes and consequences of prehistoric climate change and human migrations; and the impact of European colonization on indigenous communities. We will explore archaeology as an alternative to written histories concerning First Nations peoples, and stress the importance of working collaboratively with descendants of the people whose past we study. The course will include lectures, discussions, exams and written assignments. Prerequisite: ANTHR 206 or consent of Department.

ANTHR 312 Lower Paleolithic Prehistory

Pamela Willoughby

This course deals with the archaeology of human origins: the recovery and analysis of the earliest evidence for human cultural behaviour.  The first part of the course will review the geological and paleoenvironmental context of the Lower Paleolithic.  Then the culture history will be reviewed, from the origins of stone tool manufacture at approximately 2.6 million years ago in East Africa until the appearance of new artifact traditions throughout Eurasia and Africa around 200,000 years ago.  Finally, the course will examine the methodology of Lower Paleolithic research, and will directly address questions of what is known or can be learned about the location of early sites, archaeological site formation processes, subsistence techniques , settlement patterns, social behaviour, the use of tools and evolution of technology and cognition.  The implications of these ideas for models of human evolution will also be considered.  Prerequisite: ANTHR 206 or consent of Department. 

ANTHR 313 Middle and Upper Paleolithic Prehistory

Pamela Willoughby

This course reviews what we know about the behaviour and evolution of later Pleistocene humans in the Old World through their material culture and technology.  It begins with the transition from the Lower Palaeolithic and the initiation of regional variation in stone tool assemblages around 200,000 years ago and ends with the cultural changes which took place in response to deglaciation around 10,000 years ago.  The earlier period is labelled the Middle Palaeolithic, and its flake tool dominated assemblages are associated with either archaic  hominids or anatomically modern humans.  These assemblages are replaced around 30-40,000 years ago by blade tool industries belonging to the Upper Palaeolithic, always found in association with modern humans.  This course will review the archaeological evidence for the Middle and Upper Palaeolithic in Europe, Asia and Africa, and its implications for the explanation of modern human origins and dispersals.  The issue of the initial settlement of Australia and New Guinea will also be examined.  Prerequisite: ANTHR 206 or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years.

ANTHR 318 Political Anthropology

Schedule

Marko Zivkovic

This course will address some of the classical issues of political anthropology by drawing on case studies from the Balkans and the Mediterranean. The main thread running through the themes we will explore will be the relationship between forms of political mobilization based on personalistic and kinship ties on the one hand, and those based on state-level organization on the other. Special attention will be paid to symbolic dimensions of politics. Themes explored include: honor & shame, mafia & patronage, anarchism in Spain, uses of the past in Macedonia, national narratives and wars in Yugoslavia, the divided Cyprus and Algerian immigrants in Paris. Prerequisite: ANTHR 207  or consent of Department. 

ANTHR 320 Anthropology of Religion

Schedule 

Gregory Forth

Survey of anthropological approaches to religion and related phenomena including magic, taboo, shamanism and witchcraft. Emphasis on the connection between religious ideas and practices and other aspects of social life in a variety of cultures. Prerequisite: ANTHR 207  or consent of Department.

ANTHR 321 Religions of China in Practice

Schedule

Jean DeBernardi 

Contemporary Chinese religious culture as practices in the family, community, voluntary associations, and the political sphere. Prerequisite: ANTHR 207  or 278 or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years.

ANTHR 322 Anthropological Perspectives on Discursive Practices

Schedule

Cultural constructions of narrative and discourse; inter-ethnic communication, including discourse in the courtroom, classroom, and work settings; code choice; and communication via electronic media. Prerequisite: ANTHR 208  or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years.

ANTHR 324 Economic Anthropology

Schedule 

Kathleen Lowrey

An introduction to the sub-field of economic anthropology.  We will review some of the diverse ways that human societies organize production & reproduction, consumption, and exchange.  While we will address issues of method where necessary, the emphasis of the course is theoretical rather than methodological.  By the end of course, students should be familiar with past and contemporary debates within economic anthropology and with the fact that very divergent social scientific approaches to economic questions exist, many of which have been developed and explored outside of the discipline of economics itself.  The last weeks of the course will turn to practice, and take up intentionally experimental approaches to economies as opposed to putatively “natural” or “traditional” examples. Prerequisite: ANTHR 207  or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years.

ANTHR 332 Anthropology of Science

Schedule 

Kathleen Lowrey

This course approaches science via witchcraft. This method and perspective has a storied history in the discipline of anthropology because it raises important general questions about knowledge, culture, and reality. It has the advantage of considering these questions through a less familiar lens, so that we notice what we don’t know about science rather than relying upon all the things we think we do. Prerequisite: ANTHR 230, or one of 206 to 209, or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years.

ANTHR 350 Kinship and Social Structure

Schedule

Kathleen Lowrey

Long central to the empirical practice and theoretical corpus of anthropology, during the 1990s and early 2000s the study of kinship seemed headed toward the margins of the discipline.  In recent years there has been a renewal of interest in kinship studies.  To understand why this is so, we will track past, present, and emergent methods and frameworks for analyzing society, marriage, family, gender, personhood, the body and subjectivity. The aim of the course is for students to become confidently and knowledgeably able to participate in debates about the past and present direction of the discipline of anthropology.  You will be obliged to read substantial quantities of difficult material in order to achieve this aim.  Much of it is notoriously dry and almost all of it will require lecture-format explication on my part and engaged classroom discussion on your part to be made comprehensible. The reward for our joint efforts will be a rich  understanding of what kinds of empirical materials and theoretical concerns got the discipline of anthropology going and how they are and are not different from the sorts of empirical materials and theoretical concerns that generate most of the discipline’s energy today. Prerequisite: ANTHR 207  or 213 or consent of the Department.  Note: Not open to students with credit in ANTHR 351, 413, or 450. 

ANTHR 372 Anthropology of Food

Schedule

Jean DeBernardi

Examination of the relationship between food and culture through the historical and cross-cultural analysis of foodways. Topics covered include food, identity, and social memory, ritual and symbolic uses of food, food as a commodity, high and low cuisines, and the globalization of culinary cultures. Prerequisite: ANTHR 207 or consent of Department. 

ANTHR 385 Topics in Social Cultural Anthropology

Schedule

Ethnography and Language Revitalization

Sarah Shulist

This course concentrates on the perspectives, qualitative methods, and research strategies employed by ethnographers in contexts of language documentation and revitalization. The structure of this course will present students with an opportunity to work directly with members of endangered language communities in completing ethnographic assignments and producing material that helps provide support to revitalization efforts. See LING 311.

ANTHR 386 Topics in Archaeological or Biological Anthropology

Schedule

Biological Anthropology in Daily Life

Lesley Harrington

Is the “Paleo-Diet” valid? Are some of us really 4% Neanderthal? Are there physical characteristics that attract us to an evolutionary ideal mate? This course challenges students to think about the ways that biological anthropology intersects with ideas we encounter in everyday life. Using a seminar format, with emphasis on student participation, we will explore various topics through a biocultural lens. This course will provide students with an improved appreciation of the scope of biological anthropology, and build critical skills around evaluating scientific research. Prerequisite: Any 200-Level anthropology course, or permission of the Department

ANTHR 390 Human Osteology

Schedule 

Lesley Harrington

The human skeleton serves as a rich repository of information for anthropologists who seek to reconstruct past lives in palaeontological, archaeological, or forensic contexts. This course builds on the introduction to skeletal anatomy from ANTHR 209 to give students thorough knowledge of the elements of the human skeleton and dentition. We will learn how the biographic characteristics of sex, age, and stature are determined, and learn how the skeleton responds to illness and malnutrition. Current research in bioarchaeology will be explored, such as ancient DNA studies. Knowledge of human skeletal biology is one of the main tools in the biological anthropologist’s toolkit. Through this course students will be prepared for further study in the discipline, or have a better appreciation of human biological variation that informs a range of issues in everyday life. Prerequisite: ANTHR 209 or consent of Department.

ANTHR 391 Hominid Evolution

Schedule 

Pamela Willoughby

This course is a survey of the fossil evidence for human evolution through the examination of the operating world of the palaeoanthropologist in the 21st century.  It focuses on the Tribe Hominini  and the Family Hominidae .  After a brief general review, the first part of the course will deal with “human origins” taken literally.  What evidence is there for the initial appearance of members of the Family Hominidae, in what contexts, and what conclusions have and can be drawn from it?  This will include a detailed examination of Miocene apes, the australopithecines, and early members of the genus Homo.  Then the problem of rates of evolution within the hominid group will be examined, using Homo erectus as a focus.  The last part of the course will deal with the recent controversy over the origins of anatomically modern humans .  Fossil evidence, molecular data and other relevant sources of information will be examined for each problem, along with models for causation and their behavioural implications.  Prerequisite: ANTHR 209 or consent of Department.

ANTHR 393 Health and Healing

Schedule

Brent Hammer

A cross-cultural study through time of the beliefs and social activities associated with health, illness and healing. Prerequisite: ANTHR 207  or 209 or consent of Department.

ANTHR 396 Archaeological Field Training

Archaeological Field School

John W. Ives

Instruction in practical aspects of archaeological field and laboratory techniques. Initial lectures will cover the basic framework of northern Plains prehistory, familiarization with typical tool types, raw stone material, ceramics and faunal remains, as well as pertinent regional landforms, typical soil formation processes, and vegetation characteristics. Students will apply methods of intensive ground survey, and undertake assessment and excavation of sites under investigation. This will involve simulated site assessment and mitigation exercises conducted to regulatory standards, from research design to reporting, with duties to include maintaining accurate field notes, level records and profiles. Students will also be responsible for ensuring that artifacts they have collected or excavated are cleaned, accurately catalogued, and reported upon. Students will be expected to take part in basic occupational health and safety practices connected with access to site and survey locations. This course can be applied to the Canadian content requirement. Prerequisites: ANTHR 206 or equivalent, and consent of Department. Requires payment of tuition and additional student instructional support fees. Institute of Prairie Archaeology

ANTHR 397 Anthropological Field Training

Field school for Ethnographic Sensibility in Belgrade, Serbia

Marko Zivkovic

The FES is designed to train students in a range of ethnographic fieldwork techniques that focus on non-verbal aspects of social life in an unfamiliar culture. Students will hone their ethnographic sensibility through sensorium training methods developed in visual arts, acting, dance, performance, and music. Through a range of special exercises they will learn how to break their perceptual habits and develop acute receptivity to the nuances of the ways people move and interact, use things and spaces, and organize their time. Students will keep field journals and make final presentations on their fieldwork, accompanied by a written report. The course is aimed at anthropologists and other social scientists who want to develop their ethnographic sensibility with the particular focus on non-verbal, embodied patterns of everyday life, artists who want to explore the convergences between ethnographic and artistic training, and designers, architects, urban-planners and others interested in engaging with their practice in a culturally sensitive way. All activities will be closely supervised by experts in both the native culture and ethnographic fieldwork methods. Prerequisites: ANTHR 207 or equivalent, or consent of Department. Requires payment of tuition and additional student instructional support fees. Ethnosense Website

ANTHR 401 Ethnographic Methods

Schedule

Gregory Forth

Discussion of issues in methodology and field methods. Restricted to senior undergraduate students. Prerequisite: ANTHR 207 or consent of Department.

ANTHR 404 Mortuary Archaeology

Schedule

Theory and method applied to the interpretation of treatment of the dead in prehistoric and historic contexts. Prerequisite: ANTHR 206 or 209, or consent of Department.

ANTHR 407 Paleopathology

Schedule

A detailed survey of disease processes in antiquity as expressed in skeletal and preserved tissues. Prerequisite: ANTHR 390 or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years.

ANTHR 415 History of Anthropological Theory

Schedule

Jean DeBernardi

The History of Anthropological Theory investigates major trends in social and cultural anthropology and explores how the discipline has developed globally.  Topics covered will include cultural evolutionism and the comparative method, the Boas school and historical particularism, functionalism, structuralism, symbolic and interpretive anthropology, Marxist and historical anthropology, practice theory, postmodern anthropology, and globalization theory.  Prerequisites: ANTHR 207 or 208  and a 300- or 400-level anthropology course or consent of Department.

ANTHR 417 Anthropology of Modernity

Schedule

Jean DeBernardi

The course analyzes the ways in which anthropology as a discipline can contribute to an understanding of modernity.  In particular we will consider ways that cultural anthropologists have reworked traditional anthropological concepts and research methods in their analyses of globalization, cultural heritage, and the local impact of new technologies and mass media. Prerequisite: ANTHR 207 or 208  and a 300- or 400-level ANTHR course, or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years.

ANTHR 420 Anthropology and the Twentieth Century

Schedule

Kathleen Lowrey

This course addresses the history and contemporary status of new social movements organized around anti-colonialism, anti-racism, feminism, gender & sexuality, culture & tradition, and disability.  Using a mix of movement literatures, theoretical accounts, and ethnographic case studies, we will address why these movements emerge, what they have in common, and how they draw upon and transform both everyday experience and academic scholarship.  Prerequisite: ANTHR 207 or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years.

ANTHR 424 Visual Anthropology

Schedule

Marko Zivkovic

Introduction to visual media and visualization in the creation, reproduction and comprehension of culture over time, and the use of imagery in describing the anthropological subject. Prerequisite: consent of Department. Offered in alternate years.

ANTHR 443 Juvenile Osteology

Schedule

Sandra Garvie-Lok

The human skeleton changes dramatically in size and shape from infancy to adulthood. A good knowledge of the juvenile skeleton is crucial to age estimation and personal identification. It also opens a window on childhood in the past through a fascinating array of techniques that allow us to study the growth, health and diets of past children. This course will prepare you to study juvenile skeletal remains, providing hands-on experience in identifying skeletal elements and estimating age at death. We’ll also cover the theory of skeletal development and growth, comparative primate skeletal development, and current applied research into the lives of ancient children. Prerequisite: ANTHR 390, or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years.

ANTHR 460 Nutritional Anthropology

Schedule

Helen Vallianatos

Interrelationship between food, culture and biology from local and global perspectives. Prerequisite: ANTHR 372 or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years.

ANTHR 464 Chemical Analysis of Bone

Schedule

Sandra Garvie-Lok

Stable isotope and DNA analysis are two of the fastest developing areas in archaeology. When did ancient Romans wean their children? Were the people buried in a tomb related to each other? Were the animals sacrificed at a temple specially imported for the ritual? What Neanderthal genes do we still carry? Stable isotope and DNA analysis of archaeological human and animal remains can address these questions and more. This course provides an in-depth introduction to these powerful techniques and their many applications through readings and discussion of the current research literature. Prerequisite: ANTHR 390, or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years.

ANTHR 468 Fundamentals of Archaeological Mapping

Schedule

Kisha Supernant

The creation of maps has long been an important element of archaeological research, but with the advent of new technologies, including GIS, LiDAR, Google Earth and high resolution satellite imagery, forms of spatial analysis have become more powerful, accessible, and important in archaeological theory and practice. This course is designed as an exploration of the methods, theory, and interpretation of spatial data in archaeology. Through hands on work, students will learn how to make maps using various forms of equipment, from compasses to high-precision GPS units. In addition, students will explore the implications of maps and spatial databases when addressing social and cultural patterns. Students will learn basic techniques of GIS to produce maps. For a more comprehensive course on GIS, please see Anthr 486 – GIS in the Social Sciences. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisite: ANTHR 206 or consent of Department.

ANTHR 469 Dental Anthropology

Schedule

Lesley Harrington

The 19th-century naturalist Georges Cuvier is credited with saying “Show me your teeth, and I’ll tell you who you are.” In this course, we build on the introduction to dental anatomy from ANTHR 390 to focus on the human dentition and learn about the many things teeth can tell us about the human experience. In addition to building knowledge about dental anatomy, the course provides an opportunity to explore a range of applied topics from forensic, bioarchaeological, and palaeontological anthropology subfields. The course may also be of interest to dental clinicians. The teeth interact directly with the environment throughout the lifespan, and provide a resilient record of growth and development, genetic heritage, diet, illness, and behaviour. Knowledge of dental biology is important for understanding current issues in human evolutionary research, but will also change the way you think about teeth. Prerequisite: ANTHR 390 or consent of Department.

ANTHR 471 Readings in Anthropology

Schedule

Individual research project conducted under the direction of a Department faculty member. Prerequisite: consent of Department.

ANTHR 472 Independent Research

Schedule

Individual research project involving significant laboratory work conducted under the direction of a Department faculty member. Prerequisite: consent of Department.

ANTHR 474 Northwest Coast Societies from an Anthropological Perspective

Schedule

Andie Palmer

A survey of the cultures of the Northwest Coast from Yakutat Bay to the Columbia River. Cultures will be examined from the perspectives of the ethnographic present, historical change, and current developments. Focal areas include social structure, kinship, economic systems, material culture, ethno-aesthetics, winter dance ceremonial complexes, and language. Prerequisite: ANTHR 207  or 250 or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years.

ANTHR 476 Palaeodietary Reconstruction

Schedule

Sandra Garvie-Lok

Survey of methods used to reconstruct past human diets, with an emphasis on those that involve the study of human remains. Prerequisite: ANTHR 206 or 209 or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years.

ANTHR 477 Northwest Coast Archaeology

Schedule

Kisha Supernant

This course examines the long-term human history of the Northwest Coast culture area, a region including coastal areas of southeast Alaska, British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, and northern California. Ethnographically, the indigenous peoples of the Northwest Coast are some of the most culturally complex hunter-gatherer-fishers in the world. We will trace the earliest movement of people into the region and explore various elements of cultural practice and expression, including environment, subsistence, technologies, settlements, status, identity, art, and warfare. You will be expected to become fluent in Northwest Coast cultural and physical geography, cultural historic sequences, aspects of the region’s most important sites, and dominant archaeological theoretical approaches. We also will consider the implications of archaeology for indigenous communities of the Northwest Coast and examine how archaeologists and indigenous communities can build relationships and collaborate on research projects. Prerequisite: ANTHR 206 or consent of Department. 

ANTHR 480 Zooarchaeology

Schedule

Robert Losey

Exploration of methodological and theoretical issues in zooarchaeology through the study of animal remains from archaeological contexts. Prerequisite: ANTHR 206 or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years.

ANTHR 481 Development of Anthropological Archaeology

Schedule

John W. Ives

A survey and historical examination of the approaches and practices used in archaeology from earliest times to the present, with a particular emphasis on the changing relationship between anthropological theory and archaeology. We will begin with the 18th and 19th Century roots of archaeology in antiquarianism and the rediscovery of the Classical world, then proceeding to the impact that concepts such as evolution and uniformitarian geology had on expanding the time depth of human prehistory. The course will cover various schools of thought concerning culture historical reconstruction as well as taxonomic procedures and schema, and the emergence of chronometric dating.  In the remainder of the course, we will examine attempts to model past human behaviour, processual and post-processual archaeology, and issues in archaeology today.  We will also devote time to bodies of work provided by individuals who have had a substantial impact on archaeology, such as V. Gordon Childe, Lewis R. Binford, and Ian Hodder. Evaluation will involve examinations, written assignments and oral presentations concerning assigned readings. Prerequisites: ANTHR 206 and a 300- or 400-level anthropology course, or consent of Instructor. Offered in alternate years.

ANTHR 484 Topics in Archaeology and/or Biological Anthropology

Skeletal Trauma

Pamela Mayne Correia

Forensic anthropologists may assist with the analysis of trauma found on human skeletal remains in a medico-legal situation. This course will discuss, in detail, five primary types of trauma: blunt force, sharp force, ballistic, burning and blast trauma. The biomechanics of fractures will be explored and applied in our discussions. This course is designed for those with an advanced interest in forensic analysis.

ANTHR 485 Topics in Social, Cultural and/or Linguistic Anthropology

Anthropology of Art

Marko Zivkovic

This course will review classical anthropological studies of “primitive art” and major types of questions they pose – the function of art, the social position of art-producers, the politics of artistic presentation, the sociology of aesthetic judgments, the social agency of art objects, and the formal analysis of art as diagnostic of larger social/cultural patterns. We will explore the ambivalence of anthropology toward modern Western art, and its uneasy  dialogue with established disciplines that take various art genres as objects of historical/theoretical studies .

Humans and Other Animals

Gregory Forth

A review of anthropological approaches to human-nonhuman animal relations and relationships drawing on insights derived from ethnozoology and general social/cultural anthropology. Attention will be given to newer departures (including but not necessarily restricted to cross-cultural studies in ontology and epistemology; cryptozoology; and multi-species ethnography) as well as to longer established themes bearing on practical uses of animals (as food, labour, companions, etc.), animal symbolism (in myth, metaphor, and ritual), and folk taxonomy (ethnotaxonomy).

Places, Things, and Bodies

Marko Zivkovic

This course is a companion to the Fieldschool for Ethnographic Sensibility (ANTHR 397/573). Explore everyday spaces, objects and bodily practices through micro-ethnographies that sharpen your detective powers to observe the unnoticed. Learn to use anthropological insights into the extreme sensitivity of Papuan rainforest dwellers to sound, or Australian Aborigines to their landscapes, to discover the marvels of the quotidian. We will practice “ethnographic sensibility” through exercises in minute description, and reflect on the skills of flexible inquiry generalizable across arts, humanities and sciences. We will see how ethnographic field methods can borrow from sensorium training in arts, and it turn extend their “elastic rigour” to even the hardest of sciences. In addition to anthropology majors, this course should be of particular interest to artists, scientists, urban planers, and creative writers. Prerequisites: ANTHR 207 or equivalent, or consent of Department.

 

Legal Anthropology: Indigenous Rights

Andie Palmer

This course provides a grounding in some issues that currently tax the interpretive capacities of Canadian and other courts and boards of inquiry, as they aim to incorporate or at least acknowledge Indigenous systems of law, and the ways that anthropologists can and do participate in the advancement of indigenous rights in emergent legal settings. Topics considered may include: Anthropological investigations of the treatment of Aboriginal rights and practices in Canadian and international law; the meaning of Aboriginal title in the Canadian courts since the 2014 decision in Tsilhqot’in v. BC; the anthropologist as expert witness; oral history and its interpretation in the courts since Delgamuukw v. BC; conflicting cultural-legal perspectives on the interpretation of the spirit and intent of treaties; the Duty to Consult and the Honour of the Crown with respect to Aboriginal Peoples since Haida; problems of transcription, translation, and interpretation of testimony; the codification of nation-to-nation relationships; intellectual property rights; repatriation and control of material property; Aboriginal issues before international courts, key Aboriginal rights and title cases in Canada and before international courts; legal pluralism and the restorative justice movement ; and the UN process of recognition of Aboriginal rights. This seminar will explore the transcripts, decisions, and dissent surrounding several key cases in Canadian law, and will draw on articles from anthropologists and legal scholars. 

Urban Anthropology

Jean DeBernardi

Urban Anthropology focuses on the study of cities as crossroads where global, national and local processes intersect. Urban anthropologists employ ethnographic methods like interviews and participant-observation but also investigate urban life through a wide range of sources, including mass media and archival materials. Edmonton’s diverse neighborhoods, organizations, and businesses can provide rich resources for the study of urban life and the class will combine reading of theoretical and ethnographic studies with fieldwork exercises. [Course ethics approval in place].

ANTHR 486 Seminar in Archaeology and/or Biological Anthropology

GIS in the Social Sciences

Kisha Supernant

This course will introduce students to applications of GIS to social sciences research. The use of spatial data for social science analysis is a growing field and this course is suitable for upper-level students in any of the social science disciplines. Students will learn how to use GIS software to store data, create maps, and perform various types of spatial analysis relevant to research with social sciences data. Through a series of lab exercises, students will develop the ability to understand, collect, and manipulate spatial data from different sources. In addition, students will have a choice of either doing a Community Service Learning component or undertake an original research project using existing datasets.

Migration and Archaeology

John W. Ives

Once a mainstay in archaeological explanation, then an anathema, the topic of migration has resurfaced in recent years as a significant area of enquiry. In this seminar we will discuss migration theory in a broader social science context, examine the history of migration concepts in archaeological discourse, consider the nature of various forms of human population movement , and examine current theoretical and methodological approaches to the material culture consequences of migration. The approach will be interdisciplinary and encourage thorough consideration of linguistic, human genetic, natural historical and other sources of pertinent information. Several archaeological instances of migration will be explored as more detailed case studies, such as Indo-European, Viking, Dene-Yeneseian, Polynesian, and Australian Aboriginal instances. Students will be discussion leads for key readings in earlier parts of the course, research and make a powerpoint presentation on an instance of migration of interest to them, and  complete a term paper on the same topic. Prerequisites: ANTHR 206 or other senior archaeology courses; senior undergraduate or graduate students in related social or natural sciences with interests in migration and prehistory are also encouraged.

Plains Archaeology

John W. Ives

A problem-oriented, comprehensive survey of the archaeology of the Great Plains region of North America. This course offering will in part be organized by time, beginning with a review of the Early Prehistoric or Paleoindian Period for the entire region. We will then examine Middle Prehistoric or Archaic and Late Prehistoric Periods by region using the Northern, Central and Southern Plains areas. There will be more detailed treatment of the Northern Plains region in western Canada and the northern tier of U.S. states. In the final stages of the course, we will devote time to a consideration of ethnogenesis in Plains prehistory, particularly the attraction of Plains periphery peoples  to the Plains lifestyle, the impact of the transition to horticulture, and the shift to equestrian mobility. A term project concerning the Sonota Complex of the Dakotas plays a central role in the course, along with a term paper on a topic concerning Plains prehistoric and historic archaeology. Prerequisites: ANTHR 206 or other senior archaeology courses; senior undergraduate or graduate students in related social or natural sciences with interests in Plains prehistory are also encouraged.

The Paleoindian Phenomenon

John W. Ives

In this course we will take a comprehensive look at the science and scholarship connected with the Paleoindian or Early Prehistoric era, including its impact on the history of anthropological archaeology, its deeper relationship to modern human origins, the northeast Asian and Beringian roots of the initial settlement of the Americas, evidence and theories concerning the fashion in which the New World was first populated, various early archaeological expressions of human culture in the Americas , selected  topics pertinent to this era , and the eventual regionalization of Paleoindian economies and societies. We will also consider the underlying popular appeal of this subject and its relationship to First Nations beliefs and aspirations. Students will be discussion leads for key readings in earlier parts of the course, make a powerpoint presentation on an aspect of Paleoiondian research of interest to them, and complete a term paper on the same topic. Prerequisites: ANTHR 206 or other senior archaeology courses. Senior or graduate students in related fields of study, such as various fields of Quaternary Science or Environmental Science are also most welcome. 

ANTHR 487 Seminar in Social and Cultural Anthropology

The Circumpolar North and Global Change

Mark Nuttall

Over the last two decades or so, the Arctic has emerged as a region of dramatic environmental change. This vast part of the planet, once seen as pristine and remote, is now understood and represented increasingly as a vulnerable and fragile place, its biodiversity and peoples at risk from environmental change, contaminants, resource development and rapid social and cultural change. The aims of this course are to provide a general introduction to contemporary issues in the circumpolar North, and to explore specific issues with a focus on peoples, environment and politics. We will be examining some of the most critical issues facing the peoples and environments of the Arctic today, including sustainable livelihoods, natural resource use, environmental, social, cultural and political changes; local-regional-global interconnections; governance; and international co-operation.  The course will encourage students to relate anthropological ideas, perspectives and information to a range of contemporary social cultural, political and environmental issues in the modern Arctic regions.  

Islam, Performance, Gender

Joseph Hill

This course looks at the intersections between performance and gender in Islamic contexts. To take one example, globally, the image of the veiled Muslim woman has become an increasingly prevalent and politicized emblem of Islam. Yet an act of veiling can have radically different meanings and effects depending on the woman’s performance, the context, and the various onlookers. In addition to social performances, we will look at musical and other public performances that reconfigure the relationships between Islam and gender, showing that Islam is not a monolithic entity but is reimagined to fit in multiple contexts. Kinds of performance we will examine include music, oratory, Qur’anic recitation, calls to prayer, and everyday performances of self. The goal is not just to learn about Islamic contexts but to learn to think critically about how selves are produced through gendered performances. In addition to discussing course readings, students will locate examples of gendered performance in Islam  and present them to the class.

ANTHR 490 Human Osteoarchaeology

Schedule

Pamela Mayne Correia

As a sequel to Human Osteology, this course offers the student proficient in bone identification, with the tools to complete analysis of that skeletal material.  Traditional and current methods for bone analysis will presented as well as techniques used for excavation of human remains.  This course will present some of the issues involved in the analysis of human remains, including both ethical and legal obligations.  

ANTHR 491 Stone Tools

Schedule

Pamela Willoughby 

This course will give a detailed introduction to the study of lithic materials for archaeological analysis.  A number of different methods of studying stone artifacts will be examined.  These include the replication of tool manufacture, the creation or use of existing typologies for lithic classification and culture historical reconstruction, various methods of functional analysis , the preparation of illustrations for reports, and quantitative analysis.  Alternative ways of dealing with stone artifacts will be reviewed and assessed.  Depending on previous experience, students may be asked to carry out an independent project and/or library research for a term paper.  As an integral part of the course, actual and replicated lithic collections from both the Old World and New World will be examined in a weekly lab. Prerequisites: ANTHR 206 and one other 400-level course in Anthropology or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years.

ANTHR 494 Forensic Anthropology

Schedule

Pamela Mayne Correia

As an applied science, Forensic Anthropology is a specialization with biological anthropology.  In this course we will explore human skeletal individualization and its application to human death investigation.  Standard methods used in bioarchaeology are examined for how they apply in the modern forensic context, and how court requirements impact on their application. Students will explore mass disaster, genocide, accidental, and traumatic death investigation. Prerequisite: ANTHR 390 or 490 or consent of Department.

ANTHR 495 Archaeological Methods

Schedule

Robert Losey

The application of archaeological theory and methods to field and laboratory problems. Prerequisites: ANTHR 206 and one other 400-level course in Anthropology, or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years.

ANTHR 498 History of Biological Anthropology

Schedule 

Sandra Garvie-Lok

A survey of the development of theory and method in biological anthropology. Prerequisites: ANTHR 209 and a 300- or 400-level ANTHR, or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years.

ANTHR 499 Honors Seminar and Research Project

Schedule 

Robert Losey

A review and discussion of contemporary issues in Anthropology leading to the conception, preparation, and completion of the BA Honors essay under the supervision of an individual faculty member. Note: Not open to students with credit in ANTHR 400 or 450.


Graduate Courses

ANTHR 500 MA Thesis Prospectus

Schedule

Preparation of a research proposal leading to the MA thesis. The prospectus will state the proposed research problem, and demonstrate the theoretical and methodological knowledge required to complete the research. Closed to web registration. Department consent required.

ANTHR 501 MA Colloquium

Schedule

Jean DeBernardi

Readings, presentations, and discussions of staff research, recent advances and current issues in the four fields of anthropology. Limited to new MA students

ANTHR 504 Advanced Mortuary Archaeology

Schedule

Theory and method applied to the interpretation of treatment of the dead in prehistoric and historic contexts.

ANTHR 511 Ethnographic Field Methods

Schedule

Greg Forth

A review of the range of research methods usually falling under the general heading of ethnography. Regarding social or cultural anthropology as an empirical enterprise that generates information from basic field procedures, attention will be given to both practical and methodological  problems encountered in various research settings, and methods and techniques employed in the resolution of these. All stages of research will be reviewed, from initial research design and crafting proposals, to gaining access to social settings and activities, to establishing field relations, to the writing up of results. The focus of the course is ‘ethnography’ in the sense of research aimed at producing reliable information about human social life and culture while living in, or with, a community . Although original to anthropology, in recent decades the term ‘ethnography’ has been adopted by numerous other disciplines and, partly as a result, is now often applied to any qualitative research into social organization or behaviour. Early in the course we shall therefore survey various senses of ‘ethnography’ and determine how in particular the term applies to fieldwork in social and cultural anthropology and how it might be extended to encompass research methods in other disciplines. Not open to students with credit in ANTHR 401 or 505. Offered in alternate years.

ANTHR 517 Anthropology of Modernity

Schedule

Jean DeBernardi

The course analyzes the ways in which anthropology as a discipline can contribute to an understanding of modernity.  In particular we will consider ways that cultural anthropologists have reworked traditional anthropological concepts and research methods in their analyses of globalization, cultural heritage, and the local impact of new technologies and mass media. Prerequisite: ANTHR 207 or 208  and a 300- or 400-level ANTHR course, or consent of Department. 

ANTHR 520 Anthropology and the Twentieth Century

Schedule

Kathleen Lowrey

The relationship between the development of anthropological theory across the twentieth century and the emergence of “new social movements” organized around anti-colonialism, anti-racism, feminism, ethnicity, the environment, gender, sexuality, disability, and identity. Offered in alternate years.

ANTHR 524 Visual Anthropology

Schedule

Marko Zivkovic

Introduction to visual media and visualization in the creation, reproduction and comprehension of culture over time, and the use of imagery in describing the anthropological subject. Offered in alternate years.

ANTHR 543 Advanced Juvenile Osteology

Schedule

Sandra Garvie-Lok

Study of the juvenile skeleton, treating development and identification of juvenile skeletal elements. Other topics include the theory and practice of determining juvenile age at death and the study of juvenile health and child rearing practices in past populations using skeletal remains. Offered in alternate years. 

ANTHR 560 Advanced Nutritional Anthropology

Schedule

Helen Vallianatos

Advanced seminar on the interrelationship between food, culture and biology from local and global perspectives. Offered in alternate years.

ANTHR 564 Advanced Chemical Analysis of Bone

Schedule

Sandra Garvie-Lok

Survey of current research on the stable isotope and a DNA analysis of archaeological human and faunal remains. Offered in alternate years.

ANTHR 568 Fundamentals of Archaeological Mapping

Schedule

Kisha Supernant

The creation of maps has long been an important element of archaeological research, but with the advent of new technologies, including GIS, LiDAR, Google Earth and high resolution satellite imagery, forms of spatial analysis have become more powerful, accessible, and important in archaeological theory and practice. This course is designed as an exploration of the methods, theory, and interpretation of spatial data in archaeology. Through hands on work, students will learn how to make maps using various forms of equipment, from compasses to high-precision GPS units. In addition, students will explore the implications of maps and spatial databases when addressing social and cultural patterns. Students will learn basic techniques of GIS to produce maps. For a more comprehensive course on GIS, please see Anthr 486 – GIS in the Social Sciences. Prerequisite: ANTHR 206 or consent of Department.

ANTHR 569 Dental Anthropology

Schedule

Lesley Harrington

The 19th-century naturalist Georges Cuvier is credited with saying “Show me your teeth, and I’ll tell you who you are.” In this course, we build on the introduction to dental anatomy from ANTHR 390 to focus on the human dentition and learn about the many things teeth can tell us about the human experience. In addition to building knowledge about dental anatomy, the course provides an opportunity to explore a range of applied topics from forensic, bioarchaeological, and palaeontological anthropology subfields. The course may also be of interest to dental clinicians. The teeth interact directly with the environment throughout the lifespan, and provide a resilient record of growth and development, genetic heritage, diet, illness, and behaviour. Knowledge of dental biology is important for understanding current issues in human evolutionary research, but will also change the way you think about teeth. Prerequisite: ANTHR 390 or consent of Department.

ANTHR 571 Advanced Readings in Anthropology

Schedule

Individual research project conducted under the direction of a Department faculty member. Closed to web registration. Department consent required.

ANTHR 572 Independent Research

Schedule

Individual research project involving significant laboratory or field work conducted under the supervision of a Department faculty member. Closed to web registration. Department consent required.

ANTHR 573 Advanced Field Training

Schedule

Field school for Ethnographic Sensibility in Belgrade, Serbia

Marko Zivkovic

The FES is designed to train students in a range of ethnographic fieldwork techniques that focus on non-verbal aspects of social life in an unfamiliar culture. Students will hone their ethnographic sensibility through sensorium training methods developed in visual arts, acting, dance, performance, and music. Through a range of special exercises they will learn how to break their perceptual habits and develop acute receptivity to the nuances of the ways people move and interact, use things and spaces, and organize their time. Students will keep field journals and make final presentations on their fieldwork, accompanied by a written report. The course is aimed at anthropologists and other social scientists who want to develop their ethnographic sensibility with the particular focus on non-verbal, embodied patterns of everyday life, artists who want to explore the convergences between ethnographic and artistic training, and designers, architects, urban-planners and others interested in engaging with their practice in a culturally sensitive way. All activities will be closely supervised by experts in both the native culture and ethnographic fieldwork methods. Requires payment of tuition and additional student instructional support fees. Ethnosense Website

ANTHR 576 Advanced Palaeodietary Reconstruction

Schedule

Sandra Garvie-Lok

Advanced survey of methods used to reconstruct past human diets, with an emphasis on those that involve the study of human remains. Offered in alternate years.

ANTHR 577 Northwest Coast Archaeology

Schedule

Kisha Supernant

This course examines the long-term human history of the Northwest Coast culture area, a region including coastal areas of southeast Alaska, British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, and northern California. Ethnographically, the indigenous peoples of the Northwest Coast are some of the most culturally complex hunter-gatherer-fishers in the world. We will trace the earliest movement of people into the region and explore various elements of cultural practice and expression, including environment, subsistence, technologies, settlements, status, identity, art, and warfare. You will be expected to become fluent in Northwest Coast cultural and physical geography, cultural historic sequences, aspects of the region’s most important sites, and dominant archaeological theoretical approaches. We also will consider the implications of archaeology for indigenous communities of the Northwest Coast and examine how archaeologists and indigenous communities can build relationships and collaborate on research projects. Prerequisite: ANTHR 206 or consent of Department. 

ANTHR 580 Advanced Zooarchaeology

Schedule

Robert Losey

Exploration of methodological and theoretical issues in zooarchaeology through the study of animal remains from archaeological contexts. Offered in alternate years.

ANTHR 584 Topics in Archaeology and/or Biological Anthropology

Human Osteoarchaeology

Pamela Mayne Correia

As a sequel to Human Osteology, this course offers the student proficient in bone identification, with the tools to complete analysis of that skeletal material.  Traditional and current methods for bone analysis will presented as well as techniques used for excavation of human remains.  This course will present some of the issues involved in the analysis of human remains, including both ethical and legal obligations.  

Skeletal Trauma

Pamela Mayne Correia

Forensic anthropologists may assist with the analysis of trauma found on human skeletal remains in a medico-legal situation.  This course will discuss, in detail, five primary types of trauma:  blunt force, sharp force, ballistic, burning and blast trauma.  The biomechanics of fractures will be explored and applied in our discussions.  This course is designed for those with an advanced interest in forensic analysis. 

ANTHR 585 Topics in Social, Cultural and/or Linguistic Anthropology

Anthropology of Art

Marko Zivkovic

This course will review classical anthropological studies of “primitive art” and major types of questions they pose – the function of art, the social position of art-producers, the politics of artistic presentation, the sociology of aesthetic judgments, the social agency of art objects, and the formal analysis of art as diagnostic of larger social/cultural patterns. We will explore the ambivalence of anthropology toward modern Western art, and its uneasy  dialogue with established disciplines that take various art genres as objects of historical/theoretical studies .

Humans and Other Animals

Gregory Forth

A review of anthropological approaches to human-nonhuman animal relations and relationships drawing on insights derived from ethnozoology and general social/cultural anthropology. Attention will be given to newer departures (including but not necessarily restricted to cross-cultural studies in ontology and epistemology; cryptozoology; and multi-species ethnography) as well as to longer established themes bearing on practical uses of animals (as food, labour, companions, etc.), animal symbolism (in myth, metaphor, and ritual), and folk taxonomy (ethnotaxonomy).

Legal Anthropology: Indigenous Rights

Andie Palmer

This course provides a grounding in some issues that currently tax the interpretive capacities of Canadian and other courts and boards of inquiry, as they aim to incorporate or at least acknowledge Indigenous systems of law, and the ways that anthropologists can and do participate in the advancement of indigenous rights in emergent legal settings. This seminar will explore the transcripts, decisions, and dissent surrounding several key cases in Canadian law, and will draw on articles from anthropologists and legal scholars. Topics considered may include: Anthropological investigations of the treatment of Aboriginal rights and practices in Canadian and international law; the meaning of Aboriginal title in the Canadian courts since the 2014 decision in Tsilhqot’in v. BC; the anthropologist as expert witness; oral history and its interpretation in the courts since Delgamuukw v. BC; conflicting cultural-legal perspectives on the interpretation of the spirit and intent of treaties; the Duty to Consult and the Honour of the Crown with respect to Aboriginal Peoples since Haida; problems of transcription, translation, and interpretation of testimony; the codification of nation-to-nation relationships; intellectual property rights; repatriation and control of material property; Aboriginal issues before international courts, key Aboriginal rights and title cases in Canada and before international courts; legal pluralism and the restorative justice movement (Truth and Reconciliation Commission in Canada, the Waitangi Tribunal in Aotearoa New Zealand); and the UN process of recognition of Aboriginal rights (UNDRIP).

Places, Things, and Bodies

Marko Zivkovic

This course is a companion to the Fieldschool for Ethnographic Sensibility (ANTHR 397/573). Explore everyday spaces, objects and bodily practices through micro-ethnographies that sharpen your detective powers to observe the unnoticed. Learn to use anthropological insights into the extreme sensitivity of Papuan rainforest dwellers to sound, or Australian Aborigines to their landscapes, to discover the marvels of the quotidian. We will practice “ethnographic sensibility” through exercises in minute description, and reflect on the skills of flexible inquiry generalizable across arts, humanities and sciences. We will see how ethnographic field methods can borrow from sensorium training in arts, and it turn extend their “elastic rigour” to even the hardest of sciences. In addition to anthropology majors, this course should be of particular interest to artists, scientists, urban planers, and creative writers. Prerequisites: ANTHR 207 or equivalent, or consent of Department.

Urban Anthropology

Jean DeBernardi

Urban Anthropology focuses on the study of cities as crossroads where global, national and local processes intersect. Urban anthropologists employ ethnographic methods like interviews and participant-observation but also investigate urban life through a wide range of sources, including mass media and archival materials.  Edmonton’s diverse neighborhoods, organizations, and businesses can provide rich resources for the study of urban life and the class will combine reading of theoretical and ethnographic studies with fieldwork exercises. [Course ethics approval in place.]

ANTHR 586 Seminar in Archaeology and/or Biological Anthropology

GIS in the Social Sciences

Kisha Supernant

This course will introduce students to applications of GIS to social sciences research. The use of spatial data for social science analysis is a growing field and this course is suitable for upper-level students in any of the social science disciplines. Students will learn how to use GIS software to store data, create maps, and perform various types of spatial analysis relevant to research with social sciences data. Through a series of lab exercises, students will develop the ability to understand, collect, and manipulate spatial data from different sources. In addition, students will have a choice of either doing a Community Service Learning component or undertake an original research project using existing datasets. 

The Paleoindian Phenomenon

John W. Ives

In this course we will take a comprehensive look at the science and scholarship connected with the Paleoindian or Early Prehistoric era, including its impact on the history of anthropological archaeology, its deeper relationship to modern human origins, the northeast Asian and Beringian roots of the initial settlement of the Americas, evidence and theories concerning the fashion in which the New World was first populated, various early archaeological expressions of human culture in the Americas , selected  topics pertinent to this era , and the eventual regionalization of Paleoindian economies and societies. We will also consider the underlying popular appeal of this subject and its relationship to First Nations beliefs and aspirations. Students will be discussion leads for key readings in earlier parts of the course, make a powerpoint presentation on an aspect of Paleoiondian research of interest to them, and complete a term paper on the same topic. Prerequisites: ANTHR 206 or other senior archaeology courses. Senior or graduate students in related fields of study, such as various fields of Quaternary Science or Environmental Science are also most welcome. 

Migration and Archaeology

John W. Ives

Once a mainstay in archaeological explanation, then an anathema, the topic of migration has resurfaced in recent years as a significant area of enquiry. In this seminar we will discuss migration theory in a broader social science context, examine the history of migration concepts in archaeological discourse, consider the nature of various forms of human population movement , and examine current theoretical and methodological approaches to the material culture consequences of migration. The approach will be interdisciplinary and encourage thorough consideration of linguistic, human genetic, natural historical and other sources of pertinent information. Several archaeological instances of migration will be explored as more detailed case studies, such as Indo-European, Viking, Dene-Yeneseian, Polynesian, and Australian Aboriginal instances. Students will be discussion leads for key readings in earlier parts of the course, research and make a powerpoint presentation on an instance of migration of interest to them, and  complete a term paper on the same topic. Prerequisites: ANTHR 206 or other senior archaeology courses; senior undergraduate or graduate students in related social or natural sciences with interests in migration and prehistory are also encouraged.

Plains Archaeology

John W. Ives

A problem-oriented, comprehensive survey of the archaeology of the Great Plains region of North America. This course offering will in part be organized by time, beginning with a review of the Early Prehistoric or Paleoindian Period for the entire region. We will then examine Middle Prehistoric or Archaic and Late Prehistoric Periods by region using the Northern, Central and Southern Plains areas. There will be more detailed treatment of the Northern Plains region in western Canada and the northern tier of U.S. states. In the final stages of the course, we will devote time to a consideration of ethnogenesis in Plains prehistory, particularly the attraction of Plains periphery peoples  to the Plains lifestyle, the impact of the transition to horticulture, and the shift to equestrian mobility. A term project concerning the Sonota Complex of the Dakotas plays a central role in the course, along with a term paper on a topic concerning Plains prehistoric and historic archaeology. Prerequisites: ANTHR 206 or other senior archaeology courses; senior undergraduate or graduate students in related social or natural sciences with interests in Plains prehistory are also encouraged.

ANTHR 587 Seminar in Social and Cultural Anthropology

The Circumpolar North and Global Change

Mark Nuttall

Over the last two decades or so, the Arctic has emerged as a region of dramatic environmental change. This vast part of the planet, once seen as pristine and remote, is now understood and represented increasingly as a vulnerable and fragile place, its biodiversity and peoples at risk from environmental change, contaminants, resource development and rapid social and cultural change. The aims of this course are to provide a general introduction to contemporary issues in the circumpolar North, and to explore specific issues with a focus on peoples, environment and politics. We will be examining some of the most critical issues facing the peoples and environments of the Arctic today, including sustainable livelihoods, natural resource use, environmental, social, cultural and political changes; local-regional-global interconnections; governance; and international co-operation.  The course will encourage students to relate anthropological ideas, perspectives and information to a range of contemporary social cultural, political and environmental issues in the modern Arctic regions.  

Islam, Performance, Gender

Joseph Hill

This course looks at the intersections between performance and gender in Islamic contexts. To take one example, globally, the image of the veiled Muslim woman has become an increasingly prevalent and politicized emblem of Islam. Yet an act of veiling can have radically different meanings and effects depending on the woman’s performance, the context, and the various onlookers. In addition to social performances, we will look at musical and other public performances that reconfigure the relationships between Islam and gender, showing that Islam is not a monolithic entity but is reimagined to fit in multiple contexts. Kinds of performance we will examine include music, oratory, Qur’anic recitation, calls to prayer, and everyday performances of self. The goal is not just to learn about Islamic contexts but to learn to think critically about how selves are produced through gendered performances. In addition to discussing course readings, students will locate examples of gendered performance in Islam  and present them to the class.

ANTHR 591 Advanced Study of Stone Tools

Schedule

Pamela Willoughby

This course will give a detailed introduction to the study of lithic materials for archaeological analysis.  A number of different methods of studying stone artifacts will be examined.  These include the replication of tool manufacture, the creation or use of existing typologies for lithic classification and culture historical reconstruction, various methods of functional analysis , the preparation of illustrations for reports, and quantitative analysis.  Alternative ways of dealing with stone artifacts will be reviewed and assessed.  Depending on previous experience, students may be asked to carry out an independent project and/or library research for a term paper.  As an integral part of the course, actual and replicated lithic collections from both the Old World and New World will be examined in a weekly lab. Prerequisites: ANTHR 206 and one other 400-level course in Anthropology or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years.

ANTHR 593 Evolution and Social Life

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Pamela Willoughby

A variable topics course dealing with some aspect of human evolution paired with Anthropology 486. This course is a critical examination of the evidence for the evolution and spread of anatomically modern humans. This evidence is drawn from genetics of living people as well as fossil hominins, palaeontology, geochronology and archaeology. Alternative models for the appearance of modern humans  will be reviewed. The theme for 2015 was: The origin and dispersal of modern humans.  Is there a relationship between living people and Neanderthals?  Did the late Pleistocene see the global replacement of one kind of human by another?  Were Neanderthals able to interbreed with modern humans? Were they behaviourally clueless, randomly wandering across periglacial Eurasia?  Did symbolically-based language and culture only begin 30,000 to 40,000 years ago, giving modern Homo sapiens an unbeatable advantage?  Were all humans prior to 30,000 years ago people without culture, no matter what species they represent?  All of these ideas have come forward  in the last ten years, as the appearance and spread of anatomically modern Homo sapiens, our own species, has became a central focus in palaeoanthropology.  Offered in alternate years.

ANTHR 598 Landscape and Culture

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Andie Palmer

Cultural experiences and representations of landscape.

ANTHR 600 PhD Thesis Prospectus

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Preparation of a research proposal leading to the PhD thesis. The prospectus states the proposed research problem, and demonstrates the theoretical and methodological knowledge required to complete the research. Closed to web registration. Department consent required.

ANTHR 601 PhD Colloquium

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Jean DeBernardi

Readings, presentations, and discussions of staff research, recent advances and current issues in the four fields of anthropology. Limited to new PhD students. Optional for students with credit in ANTHR 501