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BBIC


Potential treatment from soybeans


BBIC (Bowman-Birk Inhibitor Concentrate) is the name given to a soybean-derived protease inhibitor. Protease inhibitors are a group of molecules that work to inhibit proteases (duh!). Ok, that's not helpful, but that's what wikipedia said.

A protease is an enzyme that kickstarts the catabolic process to break down protein molecules by destroying the peptide bonds holding its constituent amino acids together. From the little information I've been able to find so far, the primary action seems to be inhibition of serine protease enzymes. but there is some indication that it affects trypsin and chymotrypsin protease molecules also.

Some investigation turned up a number of recent patents for development of BBIC from de-fatted soybean. The process seems to be fairly simple, within reach of anyone with some glassware and a few readily available chemicals. I may do some experimenting in the future and give some update on the results.

In any case, the flurry of activity around BBIC may be related to a number of recent studies indicating the drug's favorable results with a few serious disorders. It has seen significant activity in cancer research, but some attention has been paid to its application in DMD.

Unfortunately, I haven't found a readily available source of BBIC for sale yet. I'm sure this may change in the near future, but for now the primary source most parents of children with DMD turn to is a ridiculously priced fermented soy milk product called Haelan 951. Right now, they are charging $60 for their product and a lot of parents are lining up to buy it. For now, the evidence that BBIC is abundantly available in Haelan 951 is as scant as information on dosing and results from studies.

Still, BBIC bears watching, if for no other reason than its lack of serious side effects or toxicity.
Bowman-Birk inhibitor attenuates dystrophic pathology in mdx mice
Pfizer Orphan and Genetic Disease Unit
2010


Protease Inhibition as a Potential Therapy for DMD
Parent Project MD Summary
Pfizer Orphan and Genetic Disease Unit

2010


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