Introduction

TamuBot Version 3.0 - Parker01

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This site provides online documentation on how to build a 4 wheeled robot for research in mobile robots. Based the initial All Terrain Robot (ATR) mobile platform produced by SuperDriod Robots, the mobile robot is remodeled and manufactured in NetBot lab, Texas A&M University and hence named as TamuBot. The initial ATR platform has neither speed feedback nor onboard processing power and is no more than a radio-controlled toy. TamuBot inherited ATR's simple mechanical design, which is a skid-steered 4-wheel independent drive platform. It has very strong off-road capabilities and stair climbling capabilities. However, TamuBot's main improvements rely on its intergration of sensors such as wheel encoders, IMUs, cameras, GPS, etc and processing power. TamuBots has 4 CPUs onboard. Three low level  AVR 8 bit micro-processors can provide real-time speed control for at most 6 independent DC motors at a sampling frequency of 1kHz each. At most 6 wheel encoders can be directly interfaced with AVRs and provides very fast dynamic response. The main CPU is an embeded Gumstix computer, which runs Linux kernel 2.6 at 400Mhz. It supports many communication protocols such as GPIOs, SPI, IIC, 4 serial ports, bluetooth, WiFi(802.11b), and USB, which allows easy intergration of external sensors such as cameras, IMUs, GPS, LIDAR, Sonar, etc.  
 
TamuBot started in 2005 and has evolved into version 3.0. Parker01 is a TAMUBot version 3.0. The name Parker01 refers to a single build of the TAMUBot version 3.0. While this guide mainly provides an understanding of how Parker01 was built and how it works, this site can also be used and expanded to be a general guide to the TAMUBot V3.0.  The intent of this site is to provide resource and documentation to robotics researchers and education agencies. We share every bit of information regarding how to construct this robot with the hope to reduced the effort of constructing a robot for fellow researchers and students. The information on this site is free for distribution only for edcuational and research usages. If you want to use the information for commercial purposes, you need to obtain authorization from us by contacting Dr. Dezhen Song in Texas A&M university.

 Bottom view of Parker01 shows the 4 motors, attached to the encoders
 the 2 H-Bridges that control the motors, the motherboard for the AVR chips
and the on board Gumstick Controller with Bluetooth antenna



Parker01 gets ready for an experiment

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Credits

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Project TamuBot has been a collaborative effort since 2005. Its version 3.0 has been matured enough so that it can be released to the public.  Over the years, many students and researchers in NetBot lab of TAMU have contributed to this project. This is just a partial list.
  
Prof. Dezhen Song, Department of Computer Sicence, Texas A&M University, (Project Director, Robot Design)
Prof. Jingang Yi, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Rutgers University, (Project Director, Robot Design)
Chang-Young Kim,  Department of Computer Sicence, Texas A&M University, (Project Manager, Circuitry Design, and Software)
Hongpeng Wang, Nankai University, Tianjin, China, (Testing, Sensors, and Software)
Pramod Nathan, Department of Computer Sicence, Texas A&M University, (Parker01 Assembly and Documentation)
Jonathan Kelm, Department of Computer Sicence, Texas A&M University, (Sensors and Software) 
Junjie Zhang, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A&M University, (IMU Intergration, Software, and Testing for TamuBot Version 1.0 and 2.0) 
Benjamin Fine, Deparment of Computer Science and Engineering, University of South Carolina (IMU Intergration)
Tyler Southard, Grove City College, Pennsylvania  (Teleoperation and communication)
John S. Glassmyer, Department of Computer Sicence, Texas A&M University, (GPIO Interrupt)

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Acknowledgment

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 This project is sponsored in part by TEES and National Science Foundation under IIS-0643298. Any opinions, findings and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation (NSF).
 
 
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