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Assessment and Reporting of Student Progress

Assessment is the process of collecting, analysing and interpreting information to assist teachers in making decisions about student progress. Assessment provides evidence of student performance relative to learning outcomes. Within the context of the St Therese Whole School Pedagogical Statement Engage, Connect, Grow, assessment is designed to determine a student’s growth point. This is achieved through student engagement in class based assessment and diagnostic screening tools. Such assessments are analysed by teachers across a range of domains - spiritual, cognitive, physical, social and creative. Assessment can take a variety of forms. It can be creative, written, multimodal, oral and involve teacher, self and peer assessment.


TYPES OF ASSESSMENT
Classroom assessment may be formal or informal and should be used to provide feedback to students to support and enhance their learning experience. Assessment may serve three purposes:

FOR Learning,

AS Learning and

OF Learning.


Assessment for Learning:

Assessment for learning involves teachers using evidence about students’ knowledge, understanding and skills to inform their teaching. Sometimes referred to as ‘formative assessment’, it usually occurs throughout the teaching and learning process to clarify student learning and understanding.


Assessment as Learning:

Assessment as learning occurs when students are their own assessors. Students monitor their own learning, ask questions and use a range of strategies to decide what they know and can do, and how to use assessment for new learning.


Assessment of Learning:

Assessment of learning uses evidence to assess achievement against outcomes and standards. Sometimes referred to as ‘summative assessment’, it usually occurs at defined key points during a unit of work or at the end of a unit of work, term or semester and may be used to rank or grade students. The effectiveness of assessment of learning for grading or ranking depends on the validity and reliability of activities. Its effectiveness depends on the nature and quality of the feedback.


Assessment Rubric:

Written student progress reports are issued each June (half yearly) and December (end of year). Student progress is measured against New South Wales Education Standards Authority (NESA) descriptors. These are outlined below.


Elementary

Basic

Sound

Thorough

Extensive

The student has an elementary knowledge and understanding in few areas of the content

The student has a basic knowledge and understanding of the content

The student has a sound knowledge and understanding of the main areas of content

The student has a thorough knowledge and understanding of the content and is able to apply this knowledge to most situations

The student has an extensive knowledge and understanding of the content and can readily apply this knowledge.

The student has an elementary competence in some of the processes and skills

The student has a basic level of competence in the processes and skills

The student has a sound level of competence in the processes and skills

The student has a thorough level of competence in the processes and skills and applies these skills to most situations.

The student has an extensive level of competence in the processes and skills and can apply these skills to new situations


        General comments in relation to English, Mathematics and Religious Education are furnished in the half yearly report. Comments            related to all subject areas are provided in the end of year reports.
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