Unit 5 
Civics Now
- Standard(s) 4. Civics
Estimated Time (When):   January-February (4 weeks) (Includes time for reteaching and enrichment)   Trimester:  2nd
Prepared Graduates
Analyze and practice rights, roles, and responsibilities of citizens. Analyze origins, structure, and functions of governments and their impacts on societies and citizens.
Concepts and skills students master:  The foundations of citizenship in the United States. The origins, structure, and functions of the United States government.

21st Century Skills and Readiness Competencies

Inquiry Questions:

  • What is the most important right of a citizen?
  • What is the most important responsibility of a citizen?
  • How does government meet its responsibility to citizens?
  • Who is government?

Relevance and Application:

  • The context and information from the past are used to make connections and inform decisions in the present. For example, the concepts of liberty continue to be defended by lawyers and citizens while on topics to include but not limited to the rights and responsibilities of citizens continue to evolve through the work of policy makers, legislators, judges, lawyers, and individuals.
  • Actions illustrate civic virtues such as civility, cooperation, respect, and responsible participation and are foundational components of our society. Examples include peaceful assembly by groups and respectful behavior during a performance or speech.
  • Knowledge of the foundations of citizenship in the United States ensures that citizens’ rights are being protected. For example, the rule of law applies to everyone in society and all individuals and groups are treated with respect.

Nature of the Civics:

  • Responsible community members understand the responsibilities of the national government to its citizens.
  • Responsible community members understand the concept of individual rights as a cornerstone to American Democracy.
  • Responsible community members understand the relationship between individual rights and personal responsibility.


Evidence Outcomes

Students can:

  • Describe and provide sources and examples of individual rights (4.1.a)
  • Give examples of group and individual actions that illustrate civic ideals in the founding of the United States. Ideals to include but not limited to freedom, rules of law, equality, civility, cooperation, respect, responsibility, and civic participation (4.1.b)
  • Define the criteria and process for becoming a citizen (4.1.d)
  • Describe how the decisions of the national government affect local and state government (4.2.d)




Resources

The Democracy Project | PBS KIDS GO! - pbskids.org Give examples of group and individuals actions that illustrate civic ideals in the founding of the United States. Ideals to include but not limited to freedom, rules of law, equality, civility, cooperation, respect, responsibility, and civic participation (4.1.b)

3-6 Student Interactives - Social Studies - UEN
Different activities around mapping, US Government and US History. (1.2.d), (2.1.b), (4.2.b)

60-Second Civics Podcast - civiced.org (4.1.b)

PBS Teachers . Thematic Teaching . Citizenship - pbs.org  Define the criteria and process for becoming a citizen (4.1.d) *use lessons 2 and 4

Bill of Rights: Primary Documents - loc.gov
Describe and provide sources and examples of individual rights (4.1.a)

Ben's Guide (9-12): National versus State - gpo.gov
Describe how decisions of the national government affect local and state government (4.2.d)


  






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Stacy Judson,
Jun 7, 2012, 1:21 PM