Ch.24 The Jazz Age

People called the 1920s the Jazz Age - in part because of the popular new music - but also because of the restless, carefree spirit of the time.  The economy boomed and many Americans prospered.  Many Americans, however, did not share in the economic gains of this era.  The 1920s produced striking new changes in American society.  New forms of entertainment such as radio and film remain popular today.  The automobile forever changed the American way of life.  It helped shift homes, shops, and factories from the inner cities to the suburbs.

Students will begin by experiencing the social unrest of the 1920s.  They will examine primary sources and analyze the Sacco and Vanzetti case.  We will also work with the map while discussing the migration of African-Americans to the northern states at this time.  Students will compare the presidency of Harding, with his call for "normalcy" and administration of corruption, to the presidency of Coolidge and his impression of honesty on the American people. 

Students will next examine and organize the factors that affected economic growth in the "Roaring Twenties."  We will explore the culture of the time, focusing in on two concepts: the cult of beauty and the cult of personality.  We will look at new forms of entertainment and music, and analyze primary source advertisements.  Students will then examine the Jazz Age and the Harlem Renaissance, focusing on the poet Langston Hughes.  They will analyze his poems and their impact on the decade. We will also tie in the topics of discrimination and nativism at this point.  Finally, students will focus on Prohibition and politics during that decade.

There is an extra credit opportunity with this chapter.  See the Magazine Cover information link below.


* Factors of Economic Growth in the 1920s Quiz - Wednesday, 2/6
  - Use Ch.24 Section 3 and the Econ Growth Factor Web Diagram as study resources

* 1920s Ad Analysis - Completed in class Wednesday, 1/30 through Wednesday, 2/6
  - Students will work in small groups in class to analyze primary source advertisements from
    the 1920s, and discuss how they represent the culture of America at that time.

* Harlem Renaissance Article Analysis - Complete in class Monday, 2/11 and Tuesday, 2/12

* Chapter 24 Section 4 Test - Thursday, 2/21


** Extra Credit
- 1920s Magazine Cover - Due by Friday, 3/1
   - Clink below on Magazine Covers Rubric and Magazine Covers Topics attachments for
     more details.


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