Email: wwittman@slcusd.org

May 22, 2019--

8th graders:

Letter to Self

Due 5/24.  20 pts (completion grade)

You will be writing a letter addressed to yourself today (end of your 8th grade year) and it will be mailed to you during your senior year of high school. Be sure to write in your best print or cursive. Have fun with this! You’ll be excited to hear from your 8th grade self when you graduate!


Introduction/Family-suggested one paragraph

  • Explain this assignment- include the date and the year

  • Describe your family structure, where you live, siblings, family animals

  • What have you done with your family during holidays, vacations, birthdays, memorable moments this year


Favorites-suggested one-two paragraphs

  • Best friend(s) and why

  • Activities- what do you like to do in your free time

  • Music

  • Sports (if any)

  • Favorite social media channel/account/youtube videos/memes


Current Events-suggested one paragraph

  • Current movies

  • News around the community and world

  • Current trends (social media, fortnite, fidget spinners, other)


Self-suggested one paragraph

  • Your current personal strengths (caring, dedicated, responsible, good at…..)

  • Special talents (writer, swimmer, baker, etc.)

  • Your physical features (height, hair color, hair length, braces, glasses, etc.)


Goals-suggested two paragraphs

Within the next 4 years, what do you hope to accomplish

  • Academically

  • Activities in school (band, leadership positions, sports, yearbook, etc.)

  • Activities outside of school (church, groups, Boy Scouts, etc.)

  • Sports

  • Service to community (volunteer work, etc.)

  • Family relationships (closer to mom, etc.)

  • Personal character (more outgoing, independent, more secure, etc.)


Your Choice-suggested one paragraph

  • Include any other information that you wish

  • You may wish to include a letter from a friend, Laguna memorabilia (sticker, ASB card, etc.) in your envelope

  • End on a positive note

  • Sign your name!!


You should have a minimum of seven paragraphs when you are finished. Proofread! You get what you put into this assignment. Don’t disappoint your future you!


Do something today that your future self will thank you for!

May 20th, 2019-- Thanks to Shannon Williams for sharing this: https://quizlet.com/_6pmag3  Test Friday, 5/24

May 6th, 2019-- Thanks to Alexis Alltucker for sharing a quizlet: https://quizlet.com/_6kw828   Test Friday, May 10th.
May 1st, 2019-- Quizlet for 1-40 roots (thanks to Mana Kiaha :-) https://quizlet.com/_67lior

April 25th, 2019-- Test on first 40 next Friday, May 3rd.

COMMON ROOT WORDS AND WORD ORIGINS

ROOTS

MEANING

WORD

alter

other

alternate, alter ego

ami, amic-

love

amiable, amicable

amphi

both ends or all sides

amphibian

ann, enni

year

anniversary, annual, biennial, perennial

anthrop

human, man

anthropology, anthropomorphic, misanthrope

aqua, aque

water

aquatic, aquarium, aqueduct

arch

chief, leader, ruler

archangel, monarch, archaic, archenemy

arthro

joint

arthritis

aud

sound

auditorium, audible, audiologist, audiotape

bell

war

belligerent, bellicose

biblio

book

bibliography, bibliophile

bio-

life

biography, autobiography, biology, antibiotic

brev

short

brief, abbreviate

cap

take, seize

capture, captivate, capacity

carn

meat

carnivorous, chili con carne

ced

yield, go

recede, secede, proceed, intercede, concession

chrom-

color

chromatic, monochrome, polychrome

chron-

time

chronicle, chronology, chronometer, synchronize

cogn

know

recognize, cognitive, incognito

cord/chord

cord

harpsichord

corp

body

corpus, corpse, corporal

crac, crat

rule, ruler

autocrat, democracy, bureaucrat, democracy

cred

believe

credible, credulous, credibility, credit, credo

cruc

cross

crucifix, crucial

crusta

shell

crustacean

crypt

hidden

cryptogram, cryptology, cryptic

culp

guilt

culpable, culprit

dei

god

deity, deify

demo-

people

demography, democracy, epidemic

dent

tooth

dentist, dentifrice, dentin

derm-

skin

dermatology, epidermis, hypodermic

dic

speak, say

dictate, predict, diction, indict

dox

belief, opinion

orthodoxy, paradox, heterodoxy

duc, duct

lead

induce, deduce, seduction, conduct, abduct

duo

two

duo

dynam-

power

dynamo, hydrodynamics

ego

self

egotist, egomania

equ

equal

equal, equity, equanimity, equate, equidistant

fac

make, do

manufacture, factory, benefactor

fil

threadlike

filament

frater

brother

fraternal, fraternize

gam-

marriage

monogamy, polygamy, bigamy

geo-

earth

geopolitical, geology, geography, geothermal

glyph

vertical groove

Hieroglyphics—Egyptian “sky writing”

grad, gress

step

gradual, progression, transgression

graph-

writing, printing

graphology, biography, telegraph, geography

gym

naked

gymnasium

gyn-

woman

gynecologist, androgynous

hemo, hema, hem

blood

hemophilia, hematology, hemoglobin

holo

whole, entire

holograph

hydro, hydr

water

dehydrate, hydraulics, hydroelectric, hydroplane

iso

equal, identical

isolate

ject

throw

inject, reject, subject, projection

jud

judge

judicial, judge, adjudicate

leg, lect

read, choose

legible, lectern, lecturer, election

liter

letter

literature, illiterate, literal

loc

place

local, location

log

word

monologue, epilogue

luc

light

lucid, elucidate

magn

large

magnify, magnate, magnificent

man

hand

manufacture, manual, manuscript

mar

sea

marine, mariner

mater

mother

maternal, maternity, matriarchy, matricide

mere

part, segment

mere

meta, met

behind, between

metacognition—behind the thinking

metri, meter-

measure

geometric, thermometer, odometer

min

small

minority, minuscule, minute

mit, miss

send

permit, submission, mission, emit,

mob, mot, mov

move

mobile, automobile, motion, promote, movie

mon

warn

premonition, admonition

mor, mort

death

mortal, mortician, immortality

morph

form, structure

metamorphosis, amorphous, morphology

mut

change

mutant, mutability, mutate

neuro

nerve

neurology, neurosis, neurobiology

nomen /nomin

name

nominal, nominate, nomenclature

nov

new

novel, renovate, innovation, novella

nym, onym

word, name

synonym, acronym, anonymous, pseudonym

odonto

tooth

orthodontist—one who straightens teeth

ortho-

straight, correct

orthodox, orthodontist, orthopedic

pac

peace

pacify, Pacific Ocean, pacifist

pater

father

paternal, paternity, patricide, patrilineal, patriotic

path

feeling, suffering

sympathy, apathy, empathy, telepathy, pathology

ped, pod

foot

pedal, pedometer, centipede, gastropod

pel, puls

push

pulsate, repulsive, impulse, compel, propel

pend

hang, weigh

pendulum, pendant, suspend, pending

phon-, phono-

sound, voice

telephone, euphony, cacophony, phonograph

plan

flat

planar, plantation, plane

pneum

lung

pneumatic

pod

feet

podiatrist

port

carry

portable, transport, portage, report,

pot

power

potent, omnipotent, potentate

psych-

soul, spirit, mind

psychology, psychic, psychobiography

pugna

fight

pugnacious, pugilist

quer, quis

ask

query, inquisition,

scent, scend

climb

ascend, ascent

schizo, schiz

division, split

schizophrenic

sci

know

scientific

sciss

cut

scissors

scrib, script

write

manuscript, scribe, proscribe, scripture

sec, sect

cut

dissect, section

sed, sess

sit

sedentary, session

sens, sent

feel, be aware

sensible, sentient

sequ, secu

follow

sequence, sequel, consecutive

serv

serve, protect

service

simil

same

similar, assimilate, simile, facsimile (fax)

siphon

tube

siphon

sol

sun

solar

son

sound

sonar, resonate, unison

soph

wisdom, knowledge

philosophy, sophisticated, sophomore (wise fool)

spec, spic

look, see

spectacles, spectator, inauspicious, prospect   

spir

coil

spiral

spir

breathe

inspire, respiration, conspire, perspiration

spond, spons

promise, answer for

respond, responsible

spont

by one’s own force

spontaneous

stat

stay, position

station

tang, tact

touch

tactile, tangible

temp

time

temporary, temporize

ten, tent

hold

tentative, tenable, tenuous

terr

earth

subterranean, terrain, terrestrial, disinter

theo

god, deity

theology, polytheism, atheist, monotheism

therm-

heat

thermal, thermos, thermometer

trophy

nutrition, food

atrophy—without nutrition

uro

urine

urologist

vac

empty

vacation, vacuum, vacuous, vacant

ven, vent

come, go

intervene, convene, contravene

ver

truth

veracity, verify, verity

vert

turn

introvert, irreversible, vertigo

vit

life

vital, revitalize, vitamin

voc

call

revoke, invocation, vocal, evocative, convocation

zoo

animal

zoo, zoology, zoolatry

PREFIXES

PREFIX

MEANING

EXAMPLES

a-, an-

not, without

amoral, anesthetic, apolitical, asocial

ab-

away from

abduction, abstain, abnormal

ad-

to, toward

adjoin, adjacent (lying near to)

ambi-

both

ambidextrous, ambivalent

ana-

up, back, again

analogy, anatomy, anagram

anti-

against

antipathy, antiwar, antisocial

apo-

from, away from

apology, apologize

auto-

self

autobiography, automobile, autocracy, automaton

bene-

good

benediction benevolent benefactor

cata-, cat-

down, against

catastrophe—a turning down

centro, centri-

around, center

concentric, centrifugal

circum-

around

circumlocution circumference, circumvent

com-

with, together

communal, community

con-

with, together

connect, confide conspire

contra-

against

contradict, contravene

de-

down, away

descend, deject (cast down)

dia-, di-

through, across

diameter, division

dis-

apart, not

disengage, discord, discomfort

dys-

ill, difficult, bad

dysfunctional, dysentery

e-

out of, from

elect (choose out of), eject (throw out)

ecto-

on the outside

ectoderm—outer skin

en-, em-

in

empathy—feeling in

endo-

within, inside

endoscope—instrument for observing inside

epi-

upon

epitaph epidermis, epicenter

eso-

inward, within

esoteric—more inward, esophagus

eu-

well, good

euthanasia—good death

ex-

out of, from

exhume, exhale, exodus

hetero-

other, different

heterosexual, heterodoxy, heterodox heterogeneous

homo-

same

homosexual, homogeneous, homogenized

hyper-

over

hypertension, hypersensitive, hyperactivity

hypo-

under

hypotension, hypodermic

il-

not

illegitimate, illicit, illegal, illegible

im-

not

imperfect, impolite, impossible

im-

into

imbibe (drink in, take in)

in-

not

indiscreet, invisible

in-

into

incorporate (take into the body)

inter-

between

intervene (come between), interstate

intra-

within

intrastate, intramural

ir-

not

irregular, irrational, irredeemable

macro-

large

macrocosm, macroeconomics

mal, male-

bad, evil

malediction malevolent, malnutrition

meta-

beyond

metaphysical

micro-

small

microscope, microcosm, microeconomics

mono-

one, single

monologue, monotheism, monarchy, monogamy

neo-

new, recent

neologism, neo-liberal, neonatology. neolithic

ob-

against

object, obstruct (build against)

palin-, pali-

back, again

palindrome

pan-

all, every

pantheism, Pan-Hellenic, panorama, pandemic

para-

beside, next to; beyond

paramilitary, paralegal, parachute

per-

through

percolate (flow through) perforate (punch through)

peri-

around

perimeter, periscope

phil-, philo-

like, lover of

philosophy, Francophile, bibliophile, philanthropy

poly-

many, several

polygon, polygamy, polytechnic, polytheism

post-

after

postgraduate, posthumous postpone

pre-

before

precede, predict (tell before)

pro-

for, forward

promote, project

pros-

toward, in front

prospect—view in front, something coming up

proto-

first

prototype, protoplasm, protobiology

pseudo

false

pseudonym, pseudoscience

re-

again, back

repeat, recede, regress (step back)

retro-

back

retrogression, retroactive

se-

away from

seduce (lead away), secede

sub-

under

submarine, subject, subhuman subterranean

sur-, super-

over, above

superhuman, superego, superintend, surpass

syn-, sym-, syl-, sys-

with, together

symphony, synonym, system, syllable

tele-

distant, far off

telephone, telepathy, television, telegram

trans-

across

transient, Transatlantic, transport (carry across)

SUFFIXES

SUFFIX

DEFINITION

EXAMPLE

-agog, -agogue

leader

demagogue, pedagogue

-cide

kill(ing)

patricide, infanticide, herbicide. suicide

-ectomy

cutting

appendectomy, splenectomy

-ia, -y

act, state

amnesia, mania, democracy, anarchy

-ic, -tic, -ical, -ac

having to do with

anthropomorphic, dramatic, biblical, cardiac

-ics

things having to do with

optics, physics

-isk, -iscus

small

asterisk—a little star

-ism

the belief in

pacifism, terrorism, socialism, communism

-ist

one who believes in

pacifist, terrorist, socialist, communist

-ite

one connected with

meteorite, polite, cosmopolite

-logy

study field of

biology, geology, etymology, cardiology

-oid

resembling, like-shaped

asteroid, spheroid

-or, -er

one who takes part in

doctor, actor, teacher, driver

-phobia

exaggerated fear

photophobia, claustrophobia, agoraphobia

-sis

act, state, condition of

analysis

 

April 9th, 2019--

8th graders-- read "The Colonization of Baja Sur" and "Indigenous Groups of the Twentieth Century" and "Native Baja California Tribes in 2000" on the website http://www.houstonculture.org/mexico/baja.html

March 28th, 2019--

8th-- BE SURE TO ATTRIBUTE CORRECT SOURCE TO EACH and add to this list of important quotes from the material we have been studying (sift through Jon Krakauer's Into the Wild, accompanying soundtrack lyrics by Eddie Vedder, and Jack London's The Call of the Wild) You can copy and paste these into your list:

Quotes from Jack London’s “To Build a Fire”:

The trouble with him was that he was without imagination. He was quick and alert in the things of life, but only in the things, and not in the significances. Fifty degrees below zero meant eighty-odd degrees of frost. Such fact impressed him as being cold and uncomfortable, and that was all. It did not lead him to meditate upon his frailty as a creature of temperature, and upon man’s frailty in general, able only to live within certain narrow limits of heat and cold; and from there on it did not lead him to the conjectural field of immortality and man’s place in the universe.

It was the time to lie snug in a hole in the snow and wait for a curtain of cloud to be drawn across the face of outer space whence this cold came.  (dog’s thought)

Alex Honnold quotes from Free Solo:

“Anybody can be happy and cozy… Nothing good happens in the world from being happy and cozy… Nobody achieves something great because they’re happy and cozy.”

“It’s about being a warrior.  This is your path and you will pursue it with excellence… You face your fear because your goal demands it.  This the ...-damned warrior spirit.”

Henry David Thoreau quoted in Colin Arisman and Casey Gannon’s film, “Only the Essentials” (opening scene):

I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived. Henry David Thoreau

Colin Arisman quoted in his and Casey Gannon’s film, “Only the Essentials”:

“Feels like I went back in time 1000 years… absolutely pristine.”

"Getting used to living outside.  It just feels good, and I'm glad to be out here."

“My mind clears with the storm.  I drift through this land enveloped in its grace.”

John Muir quoted in Colin Arisman and Casey Gannon’s film, “Only the Essentials”:

Everything is flowing -- going somewhere, animals and so-called lifeless rocks as well as water. Thus the snow flows fast or slow in grand beauty-making glaciers and avalanches; the air in majestic floods carrying minerals, plant leaves, seeds, spores, with streams of music and fragrance; water streams carrying rocks... While the stars go streaming through space pulsed on and on forever like blood...in Nature's warm heart.
My First Summer in the Sierra (1911) chapter 10

Here's a link to an Into the Wild PDF http://www.metropolitancollege.com/Into%20The%20Wild.pdf

March 21st, 2019--

8th-- Mini essay-- Consider the following points regarding Jack London’s “To Build a Fire”

·       What is the dog doing in the story (foil)? 

·       The story is unique in that it does not feature an enemy/villain/antagonist (So what is the problem for the man?  What is working against him and what must he do to succeed in the fight?). 

·       Very simple plot helps reader focus on essentials of story, conflict, and theme. What is London’s point?  What is he suggesting about all of us?

Choose at least one of these topics and discuss the story in at least one FULL paragraph (1. Topic sentence [answer the prompt] 2. Support with examples/evidence 3. Wrap up).

7th-- Mini essay—

Much of Twain’s story so far concerns itself with morality, what’s “right” and what’s “wrong,” which kind of behavior and thinking is “good” and what’s “bad.”  

Reread the end of chapter 13.  Huck, “The Red Handed,” falls asleep immediately, satisfied and content.  Tom and Joe, “The Black Avenger of the Spanish Main” and “The Terror of the Seas,” have trouble.  

Why the difference?  What is Twain suggesting about “conscience?”  Where does conscience come from? What is conscience? 

Answer with at least two FULL paragraphs:

1. Topic sentence (answer the prompt)

2. Support with examples/evidence

3. Wrap up.

March 20th, 2019-- 8th-- Watch the film adaptation of Jack London's "To Build a Fire" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RBB06RLmCcU&t=8s It is narrated by Orson Welles, and he stays very true to the text. It's good! If you would like to read the original text: http://www.online-literature.com/london/101/

March 19th, 2019--

8th-- In the next week, we will be reading from Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer: http://www.metropolitancollege.com/Into%20The%20Wild.pdf

Watch trailer for the movie version: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g7ArZ7VD-QQ

March 18th, 2019--

Free PDF of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain in the public domain: https://www.planetebook.com/free-ebooks/the-adventures-of-tom-sawyer.pdf

March 7th, 2019--

8th We are finally getting back to some literature! Reading in Jack London's The Call of the Wild began yesterday. We will finish chapter one today. Recall the work we did with the prologue, and pay special attention to what London suggests in describing the change in environment Buck is experiencing. How will he change in his new set of circumstances? What might happen if he doesn't change? Why is he in this situation? What lesson(s) does he learn from the man in the red sweater in Seattle? If you miss a day of class, you can keep up with reading by finding the book online. Search the title; it is in the public domain. Here's a good version that I found: https://www.ibiblio.org/ebooks/London/Call%20of%20Wild.pdf

7th We are splitting our class periods between lit. analysis presentations and the district benchmark argumentative essay assessment (do not work on this at home unless you are catching up from an absence).

Feb 28, 2019-- District Argumentative Essay Benchmark tests

2018-19 San Luis Coastal Unified School District

7th/8th Argumentative Writing Prompt


SCORING

The essay will be scored using the following criteria:


  • Purpose and Organization: Is the main idea clearly communicated? Is the essay clearly focused? How well did your ideas thoughtfully flow from beginning to end using effective transitions? How effective was your introduction and your conclusion?

  • Elaboration/Evidence: How well did you integrate relevant and specific information from the sources? How well did you elaborate your ideas? How well did you clearly state ideas using precise language that is appropriate for your audience and purpose? Did you address opposing arguments and points of view? Did you cite the evidence properly?

  • Conventions: How well did you follow the rules of grammar usage, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling?










San Luis Coastal Unified School District

7th Argumentative Writing Prompt

STUDENT DIRECTIONS:

Research


Helicopter Parents:

  • How involved should parents be in their children’s school lives?

  • At what point in their education should students learn to be independent?

  • Does too much parental involvement discourage student independence?


Consider your position on the level of involvement parents should have with their teenager’s education.  State your claim. Clarify your position by incorporating evidence from the provided research.


You have three texts to read relating to the issue:

  • “Putting Parents in Their Place: Outside of Class”

  • “Hardy Knox Middle School: Parent Involvement Policy”

  • “Letter from a ‘Concerned Mother’”

ERWC Articles on Helicopter Parents [PDF version]

As you read and re-read these texts, think about what they show you about the issue. Think about what position you will take and what evidence you will use to support your thinking. Finally, write an essay explaining your belief about the following question: Do helicopter parents harm or help their children?

Be sure to use evidence from the texts, as well as your own knowledge, to support and develop your thinking.  Remember that this is an argumentative essay, so be sure to address opposing arguments and points of view.

Writing the Essay


You are being asked to write a multi-paragraph argumentative essay, so be as thorough as possible and include comments supported by evidence from the sources. Remember to check your notes and your outline as you write and refer to the articles as often as you like.  


Argumentative Scoring


Your essay will be scored using the following criteria:


  • Purpose and Organization: Is the main idea clearly communicated? Is the essay clearly focused? How well did your ideas thoughtfully flow from beginning to end using effective transitions? How effective was your introduction and your conclusion?

  • Elaboration/Evidence: How well did you integrate relevant and specific information from the sources? How well did you elaborate your ideas? How well did you clearly state ideas using precise language that is appropriate for your audience and purpose? Did you address opposing arguments and points of view? Did you cite the evidence properly?

  • Conventions: How well did you follow the rules of grammar usage, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling?



.

San Luis Coastal Unified School District

8th Argumentative Writing Prompt

STUDENT DIRECTIONS:

Research

Parents and teachers worry about the impact of celebrities on teenagers and their decision making.  Adults want positive influences to guide teenagers in their decisions about how to act, what to wear, how to dress, what to eat, etc…. Are celebrities good role models?


Questions to consider:

  • Are teens too passionate about celebrities?

  • Do you think celebrities change the behavior of teeangers in a positive or negative way?


Prompt: State your position on the positive or negative influence you feel celebrities have on teenagers; is the influence generally positive across the population of teens in the U.S., or is it negative?  As you develop your claim, utilize the research material provided to support your position. Be sure to elaborate on any quotations you included in your essay.


You have three texts to read relating to the issue:


As you read and re-read these texts, think about what they show you about the issue. Think about what position you will take and what evidence you will use to support your thinking. Finally, write an essay explaining your belief about the following question:

Be sure to use evidence from the texts, as well as your own knowledge, to support and develop your thinking.  Remember that this is an argumentative essay, so be sure to address opposing arguments and points of view.

Writing the Essay


You are being asked to write a multi-paragraph argumentative essay, so be as thorough as possible and include comments supported by evidence from the sources. Remember to check your notes and your outline as you write and refer to the articles as often as you like.  



Argumentative Scoring

Your essay will be scored using the following criteria:


  • Purpose and Organization: Is the main idea clearly communicated? Is the essay clearly focused? How well did your ideas thoughtfully flow from beginning to end using effective transitions? How effective was your introduction and your conclusion?

  • Elaboration/Evidence: How well did you integrate relevant and specific information from the sources? How well did you elaborate your ideas? How well did you clearly state ideas using precise language that is appropriate for your audience and purpose? Did you address opposing arguments and points of view? Did you cite the evidence properly?

  • Conventions: How well did you follow the rules of grammar usage, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling?


Feb. 27, 2019-- Brightbytes survey: www.BByt.es/7E3NM

Feb 15, 2019--

We are all about rhetoric and persuasion now, ETHOS, LOGOS, and PATHOS. Due dates are set; clock is ticking! Know yours! (2/21-3/1). Keep in mind that you'll need several days to rehearse the delivery of your speech. The first step is careful research and note-taking, then drafting and revising, and finally rehearsal. A solid, fact-filled draft should come first. Revise it so that it reads well, then rehearsing it and finally presenting it will be efficient and even pleasurable (really!). Construct your draft using the same blueprint we have been learning to use all year; addressing counterclaims/audience concerns is the only difference with this type of writing. Introduce those wherever the discussion calls for it, and explain that you understand other ways of seeing some of the points in your argument. Doing so will show that you are a reasonable person who cares about the truth of the issue, not just in being right. This puts minds at ease and increases your ETHOS (and LOGOS). Then overwhelm each with more argumentation of your own, in a nice way ;-).

7th-- Don't forget to keep reading/thinking about/drafting and revising your lit. analysis DUE March 5th

Feb. 7th, 2019--

Tips from Purdue University on how to write and speak persuasively: https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/teacher_and_tutor_resources/teaching_resources/effective_persuasion_presentation.html

Feb. 6th, 2019--

We are finishing up the research projects, and it's time to look forward to our next rhetorical challenge, a persuasive speech. We will put a schedule of due dates together like we did for the research presentations, the first group of individual speakers presenting on Feb 21st. I hope that the freedom of choice in this assignment excites you; you may choose to speak on an issue close to home, perhaps here on campus or one in your neighborhood, or you may speak to us about a national or global issue.

Persuasive Speech Gradesheet

__ / 10 INTRO:  Begin with interesting statement or fact, maybe a vivid description (not “I did my speech on…”).  Give brief background (what are you talking about and why is it important?) and clearly state your position (thesis statement—what should we believe, or what should be done?).

__ / 30 SUPPORT:  Support your position with convincing facts (cite credible sources for key facts—tell us where you found the info).  Explain your points completely—connect facts/examples to your thesis.  ADDRESS COUNTERCLAIMS:  anticipate, explain, and answer audience concerns/counterarguments.  CONCLUDE: Wrap-up by revisiting your opening and thesis, describing one last example for why we need to believe or do what you want us to do or believe, then finishing with a final argument, suggestion for action, or interesting/funny thought related to your argument.

__ / 10 DELIVERY/POISE:  Hold audience’s interest with good volume, eye contact, posture, and flow (use of visual aid might help us get your point, and you might get extra credit)

MEET TIME LIMIT, THREE TO SEVEN MINUTES.  Two points deducted for every 30 seconds over or under.

Jan 30, 2019--

CONGRATULATIONS to those of you who completed the paper and presentation. Now it's time to wrap this thing up and put it to bed! Complete the following Research Project Reflection assignment and submit short-answer essay responses within a week of completing your presentation and submitting your paper, (detailed, FULL paragraphs-- 1. topic sent. 2. show/explain/discuss evidence 3. wrap up answer, 60 pts.):

Prewriting:  Think of the thoughts and experiences you had as you moved through each phase of the project we just finished (nearly one month long!).  List the phases (1. Beginning to understand the first instructions and overall assignment, 2. choosing the subject, 3. beginning reading/research/notes, 4....).  

Short-answer responses (at least one full paragraph-- elaborate; show and discuss examples if you want to do well here!):

What important lessons did you learn regarding how you:

1)      made choices and began to act in first few phases

2)      developed a strategy for producing the products (paper and speech with board).  How well did you incorporate the materials (resources on my website) and instructions in your strategy?

3)      Managed your time during the course of the many weeks leading up to your due date.

 Presentation reflection

1)      List three important lessons you learned from watching others present (consult your notes).  Explain how you will use what you learned in the future.

2)      List three important lessons you learned while preparing and delivering your own speech.  Explain how you will use what you learned in the future.

3)      List three important lessons you learned from reviewing your grade and teacher comments.  Explain how you will use what you learned in the future.

Tuesday, Jan. 29--

Research Paper Checklist

1)     Paper is not in a folder/cover and there is NO title page..  It is stapled in upper left corner.  

2)     Heading has four evenly double spaced lines: 1. full name, 2. course name and period #, 3. assignment name (research paper), and 4. Date final draft was printed.  Heading is aligned left.

3)     Writer’s last name and a page number appear in upper right of all pages that follow (in "header").

4)     Title is in same style and sized font as rest of paper.  Title is not in quotation marks, not underlined, does not have extra spaces above or below, but is centered.  Title mentions subject of paper and hints at idea of thesis.

5)     All paragraphs are indented at the start.  No extra spaces between paragraphs.

6)     In-text documentation shows parenthetical notes following bits of specific information.  These notes show the first word of the corresponding works cited entry and a page number when appropriate.  No “p.,” “page,” or comma before the page number. Periods come after the parentheses.  The margin on the left side of direct quotations longer than three lines is indented ten spaces (two tabs). 

7)     Works cited says Works Cited at top, centered in same size/style font as rest of paper.  Entries appear in reverse paragraph order and are alphabetized by first word.

8)     The paper is evenly double spaced and printed in ink and in the same style and sized font.  Writing is on one side of page.  Margins are one inch or one and one-quarter inches.

9)     There are no spelling errors, missing capital letters where necessary, or missing periods.  All sentences make sense. 

10) There are no run-on sentences, nor are there fragments in the paper.

11) Thesis statement is clearly stated after introductory information.  All points made in thesis are supported with evidence and explanation.

Monday, Jan 14th, 2019--

Who's ready to start drafting? Be sure to consult the directions and gradesheet below periodically as you write the paper to ensure you are producing what is required. Also, Format the final draft correctly (type it up as a single-spaced document, then select all [ctrl+A] and choose double space from the drop-down "Format" menu): Formatting Model and instructions:

First and Last Name

Course Title and period #

Assignment name

Date of final draft

Title Every Paper

Double space all formal assignments.  All lines should be evenly double spaced, including your name, class information, and date. Do not skip lines between paragraphs.  The easiest way to ensure that you double space all lines evenly is to type all text as a single spaced document, then “select all” (ctrl+A, or use “Edit” menu), and use the formatting tools (buttons are the best) to space and justify (align text to left, center, or right).  Choose “align left” so that left margin is straight, but the right is not.

Indent each new topic sentence.  Use two spaces after end punctuation.  See the bigger gap between sentences?  Choose an easy-to-read, 12 point font.   Use 1 inch margins for the right and left sides (1.25 inches are the default, or automatic, settings on most computers—change them to be an MLA superstar; not the end of the world if you don’t).  Use 1.00 inch margins for the top and bottom of your documents (default settings).  Your last name and a page number goes in the upper right corner of every page.

Refer to this sheet when proofreading to help you follow these formatting guidelines.  Your papers will have the advantage of looking professional.

 

You should revise your draft at least twice, with restful nights in between each.

Monday, Jan. 7th, 2019-- 

10 pages of notes are due Friday, Jan. 11th (10 pts.).  Remember that a "page" of notes should be organized so each note is clearly separate from the next and there is blank space to the left.  This means that only about five or 6 notes will fit onto one page.  Short, direct quotes are best-- these can be inserted into the text of your paper later as supporting evidence (look for quotes that relate directly to your thesis).  Be VERY SURE to include info on which source gave you each note.  

Your THESIS STATEMENT is due Weds. Jan. 16 (or sooner-- I'll look at it in the free moments we have during classes) 10 pts.

Paper AND presentation due Weds Jan. 30. 200 pts (!!!)

INFO AND LINKS TO RESOURCES FOR RESEARCH PROJECT BELOW (don't get overwhelmed; take steps one at a time and do NOT procrastinate!  USE CLASS TIME well):

In the next few weeks, you should be taking notes on the life and times of your research subject, a significant and researchable person.  If you choose a significant author, I will award a few points of extra credit on your paper.  Your goal is to learn as much about the person and his or her time period as you can.  Then, by the end of next week, Jan. 11th, use your knowledge of facts to form an opinion about the whole story.  The paper, which you will present to the class (see presentation gradesheet below), needs to be an argument about the person, not a simple summary of his or her life.  Learn the facts this week and next so you can see connections between them and teach us what the most interesting angle is on that life story.  Here are the official assignment sheets for the paper AND the presentation, also see the Purdue OWL links to guidelines for building a proper Works Cited page:


The Research Paper Assignment

The Intro and Thesis Statement

1.       Draw your reader into your paper with a brief description, amazing fact, or other interesting, relevant idea. 

2.       Summarize the basics of your subject’s life—not the whole thing!  Give a few basics of time, place, and situation then follow up with a unique detail that transitions your reader into the broad statement you will make at the end of the intro (your thesis).

3.       State your thesis (as the expert on your subject, state the most important idea, or series of related ideas, I should know about him or her—a point/argument that you can explain/prove now that you’ve learned so much more about him or her than the general public knows-- argue a point about the person's overall story; don't simply state what the person did).

 

The Body Paragraphs  (Support your thesis throughout the rest of the paper)

1.       Begin each of the body paragraphs with an idea (topic sentence) that proves your thesis.

2.       Back each of these up with examples and quotations from your research (inside each paragraph).

3.       Explain the point of each paragraph as you give examples/quotations and connect the evidence to your thesis.

 

The Conclusion  (last chance to convince your reader that your ideas are true and meaningful)

1.       Revisit your opening (if appropriate) and the idea of your thesis statement—be careful that it does not sound exactly like your thesis; reader will be annoyed by repetition.  Try to make it sound like a logical follow-up of the point made in your last body paragraph (a transition).

2.       Support this final topic sentence with new quotations, statistics, brief anecdotes (stories), and/or your own specific, clear reflections on the argument you’ve made throughout the paper.  Show your reader that you have important thoughts about your argument (not the same general thoughts that just anybody might have about your person).

3.       Make sure your final line is strong—avoid offering a flowery compliment or giving advice to your reader.

 

Your paper should be FOUR OR FIVE PARAGRAPHS-- an intro>thesis, two or three supporting paragraphs, and a conclusion.  The main concern should be with organization of the argument; we do not write to fill space but to communicate, persuade, and illuminate.  Make your point by developing/supporting your good idea (your thesis)!

 

Research Paper Rubric

___ / 10  introduction that orients reader to subject and finishes with a strong, clear thesis statement

___ / 50 logically organized supporting statements; pertinent specific evidence documented according to the MLA in-text documentation guidelines— at least three sources are cited on a Works Cited page: at least one title is a nonfiction book, at least one is a periodical (magazine), at least one is an electronic source (WWW).  All ideas are clearly explained (make the point of each paragraph clear and connect ideas to your THESIS STATEMENT)

___ / 20  strong conclusion that revisits thesis without repeating language exactly and adds insights discovered in research

___ / 20  presentation/formatting, grammar, mechanics/usage

 

Plagiarism

Every year at least one student demonstrates irresponsible scholarship by submitting writing (ideas and/or direct quotations) that is not his or her own and failing to credit the source.  DON’T LET THIS BE YOU!  The source of all specific ideas, facts, and direct quotations MUST be documented.  Keep track of where the information that you may or may not use in your paper comes from; make a note of the source as you take notes.  The ideas, facts, and direct quotations that make it into your paper must be accompanied by parenthetical notes at the end of the sentence in which they appear.  Failure to do this could result in a failing grade on the paper.

Research Presentation Gradesheet

Poise and Delivery

0  1  2

0  1  2  3  4

0  2  4  6  8  10  12  14

 

0  1  2  3  4  5

wait for audience before beginning

posture—stand tall, no leaning or swaying

dynamic speaking: eye contact, good volume, clear pronunciation and enunciation—no reading / monotone, no hesitations (aaaa, ummm, okay, like)

professional and appropriate vocabulary, key terms pronounced and used correctly

Organization and Development of Content

0  1  2  3

0  2  4  6  8

0  4  8  12  16  20  24

0  1  2  3  4  5

0  2  4  6  8

 

 

 

0  1  2

intro begins with a relevant attention getter (set scene, quote, staggering statistic)

valid thesis (an interesting, arguable point?) clearly stated early

factual support that directly proves thesis throughout presentation

 

visual aid incorporated into presentation

conclusion creates a sense of closure by linking to the relevant attention-getter, restating thesis, and wrap-up (create closure in the discussion by giving a final thought on your argument).

meets time limit—two points deducted per thirty seconds under or over (Three to 6:00 minutes—DON’T GO OVER! PLAN and PRACTICE)

 

            /75

Visual

0  1  2  3  4  5

 

 

0  1  2  3  4  5

0  1  2  3  4  5

 

0  1  2  3  4  5

 

0  1  2  3  4  5

picture of your person is big and clear enough to see (most of an eight 1/2 by eleven inch piece of paper), full name displayed above picture, and birth and death dates displayed underneath

a labeled map of where this person lived or traveled

a time line (not hand lettered—use a computer, think about using pictures to show events)

at least one key term/idea associated with your thesis is defined in words, by a labeled picture, or both

Aesthetics—overall look of board is professional, balanced, and communicative

 

All material-- especially lettering—must be BIG ENOUGH to read/understand from anywhere in room; if any item causes the viewer confusion rather than instant comprehension, it is harming your presentation, not aiding it, and that item will cost you points.

 

            /25           Total Points for Presentation  /100

 

Help with MLA works cited page, in-text documentation that goes with works cited page, and entire paper guidelines (sample paper):

Guidelines for entering correct order of info on works cited page (terms explained and examples given below list of proper order):

https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and_citation/mla_style/mla_formatting_and_style_guide/mla_formatting_and_style_guide.html

Sample works cited page:

https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and_citation/mla_style/mla_formatting_and_style_guide/mla_sample_works_cited_page.html

Sample paper:

https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and_citation/mla_style/mla_formatting_and_style_guide/mla_sample_paper.html

Directions for entering types of sources not covered in above docs (like interviews):

https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and_citation/mla_style/mla_formatting_and_style_guide/mla_works_cited_other_common_sources.html

Go ahead use web tools like Easybib.com and Bibme.com, but check their work!  They don't always get it right!

Thursday 12/13--

Richard Lanham's "Paramedic Method" for revising prose-- USE IT!  Make every sentence of your paper concise and lively, VIGOROUS!

Vigorous writing is concise.  A sentence should contain no unnecessary words, a paragraph no unnecessary sentences, for the same reason that a drawing should have no unnecessary lines and a machine no unnecessary parts.  This requires not that the writer make all his sentences short, or that he avoid all detail and treat his subjects only in outline, but that every word tell.    --William Strunk quoted in E.B White’s introduction to Strunk and White’s The Elements of Style Macmillan, 1959 (first printed in 1935).

 

Steps 1 through 5 of Richard Lanham’s Paramedic Method from Revising Prose Macmillan, 1992.

1.       Circle the prepositions

2.       Circle the “is” forms

3.       Ask, “Where is the action?” “Who is kicking who?”

4.       Put this “kicking” action in a simple (not compound) active verb

5.       Start fast—no slow windups

 

“Lard Factor”= the percentage of words eliminated from original sentence.  Divide total number of words in the original sentence into number of words removed.

Examples:

 

Original sentence from the conclusion of an essay on Anne Frank:

 

 

 

 

 

Where’s the action?

 

 


Original sentence from an autobiographical essay

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Original sentence from the same essay

 

 

 

 

 

 Original sentence from a research paper

 

 

 

 

Original sentence from a research paper

 So all in all I would say that Anne is a nice girl with good and bad qualities.

 

This sentence suffers from a slow start.  Watch what happens when you cut it:

Anne is a nice girl with good and bad qualities.  Better—more concise.  Eight words eliminated, so… 8 ¸18 = .44  LF =44%

 

Answer: nowhere!  Give your subject an action:

Anne holds grudges, but shines overall.  Sentence makes a valuable point, referring to specifics and stating a stronger opinion.  12¸18=.67 LF =67%

 

I then looked back at the bush and stared closely at it and noticed that there were huge thorns covering the whole bush!

 

Huge thorns covered the whole bush!  LF=74%  I know this happened after the event described earlier, so “then”  can go.  I know this is the writer’s observation, so “I” and “looked back…stared closely…and noticed that there were” can go.  The action, “…were…covering,” is compound (more than one word) and passive—make it active: “covered.”

 

So I took a bite out of it and it literally exploded in my mouth, releasing temperatures that seemed to soar over 10,000 degrees. 

 

The 10,000 degree berry filling exploded in my mouth.  LF=63%  Think carefully about the action; the berries burning his mouth grabs attention and makes the point better than “So I took a bite…”  The berries rule this sentence, not the writer and his bite!

 

Stowe would not stop now until she had completed her task of convincing as many as possible that slavery was a terrible and malignant truth, and Americans were listening.

 

Americans heard Stowe’s convincing argument against slavery. LF 76%  The important action, Americans influenced by Stowe’s work, is emphasized.

 

One reason that parents should stop being super involved in their children’s lives when they are in middle school is because it can affect their ability to be independent when they are older.

 

Simple fix: Just remove the “One reason that,” and the “is” before the “because.” LF 12%

 

Better fix: Children learn self-reliance in early adolescence, and parents’ excessive meddling hinders that learning.  Notice the actions in the sentence and how they show the most important points.  LF 61%

 

Wednesday, 12/12--

Help with MLA works cited page, in-text documentation that goes with works cited page, and entire paper guidelines (sample paper):

Guidelines for entering correct order of info on works cited page (terms explained and examples given below list of proper order):

https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and_citation/mla_style/mla_formatting_and_style_guide/mla_formatting_and_style_guide.html

Sample works cited page:

https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and_citation/mla_style/mla_formatting_and_style_guide/mla_sample_works_cited_page.html

Sample paper:

https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and_citation/mla_style/mla_formatting_and_style_guide/mla_sample_paper.html

Directions for entering types of sources not covered in above docs (like interviews):

https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and_citation/mla_style/mla_formatting_and_style_guide/mla_works_cited_other_common_sources.html

Go ahead use web tools like Easybib.com and Bibme.com, but check their work!  They don't always get it right!

Tuesday, 12/11 Here is the rubric that will be used to grade your informative/explanatory essay due Thursday, 12/13: https://portal.smarterbalanced.org/library/en/performance-task-writing-rubric-explanatory.pdf You intro should teach me the basics of your favorite activity; thesis statement asserts your idea(s) on how/why it is a rewarding use of your time and energy (think short-term and long-term). The rest of the essay supports and develops that thesis while informing me in more detail of activity.

Monday, 12/10--

SRI test:  https://h100000583.education.scholastic.com/slms/studentaccess

Friday, Nov 30th--

I just finished grading and recording quite a lot of work. Please check Powerschool and let me know on Monday if something doesn't look right. If you'd like to know how to do better, count the number of zeroes you have and that will probably answer your question.

Remember:

8th-- Walk Two Moons essay exam Thursday, 12/6. 50 pts. Review/revise/rewrite mini essays for prep. Talk to a parent or a trusted smart person about the book and our work with it for prep.

7th-- Lit. Analysis #2 due Tuesday. 50 pts. If you are turning in a paper, arrive on time with the printed paper in hand. Make the good impression, not the hairbrained one. USE THE RESOURCES on this site (below)-- especially the ASSIGNMENT SHEET with requirements, instructions, and expectations. Don't forget the formatting model, too-- not that difficult to get that part right.

Enjoy the weekend :-)

Monday, Nov. 5th--

7th-- Due Thursday, Nov. 15th. 25 points (you will read your tale aloud to the class)

Canterbury Tales Tale

Much of the fun in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales is found in the play of each teller.  Each has his or her own agenda or special message for the audience.  Not all can be trusted!  Satire can be strong in each Tale.

Have fun creating a “Canterbury Tale” of your own set in modern times.  Establish tension immediately, like Chaucer did in many of his Tales, by having your tale-teller tell about recognizable figures in our society.  What kind of satirical tale would a student tell?  Who might he lampoon, or satirize?  A doctor?  An athlete?  A policeman?  Possibilities are countless.  Be creative, funny, and critical.

Your tale should have a beginning, middle, and end.  A conflict should develop, and it should be resolved to show some meaningful message consistent with the teller’s opinion on the subjects of the tale and their situation.  It should take between four and 9 minutes to read your tale aloud (two to 4+ pages double spaced with regular margins and 12 pt simple font).

Oct 8th--  7th--

7th-- We are balancing our attention this week: a new assignment, the Beowulf Riff script will be due MONDAY Oct. 15th. and your first lit. analysis project (pdf) is due 11/1, 

Riff on Beowulf assignment

Robert Nye’s Beowulf: A New Telling shows an attempt to portray the “root meaning” of the original poem that is now 1000 to 1200 years old. We see evidence of his concern with “root meaning” (or theme) in his use of metaphors, symbols, and philosophical speeches. Like all stories in the oral tradition, it shows listeners, or readers, the values of the culture that created it and consumed it. Sadly, the USA does not have an epic poem that moves listeners to feel connected and educated in the culture. So... your job is to write one, or, at least part of one. Play with figurative style (symbols, metaphors, analogy, personification), and write an adaptation of an episode in Robert Nye’s Beowulf: a New Telling to reflect our culture and its values. Have fun, but keep it school-appropriate!


Hints: Brainstorm possible modern-day characters/forces of our time that might represent the characters/forces of Nye’s version of Beowulf. Who/what kind of character might you use for Beowulf? For Unferth? Queen Wealhtheow? Hrothgar? Wiglaf? What evil force, monster, or person might represent Grendel? Show a conflict and a resolution. If your adaptation is chosen by the group of six to 8 students to which you are assigned, you and your group members will adapt the scene to our little stage (in class) and you will perform a three to 10 minute skit.

Final draft of your script is due on Oct. 12th. 30 pts. You will then be assigned a group and begin collaborating.

Oct 4--  7th grade Beowulf extra credit opportunity:

Visit https://www.bl.uk/collection-items/beowulf and learn what you can in a half hour or so-- go where your interest takes you.  Write up a report on your findings and finish with a concluding paragraph or two explaining the two or three facts and/or ideas you find most interesting.  NO MORE THAN ONE PAGE SINGLE SPACED IN 12 pt. FONT and with normal margins (one or one and a quarter inch-- just use default).  Due Monday, Oct 8th.  15 points possible.  Be sure to cite the source for all info and ideas.

Oct 2--

7th grade-

Monthly Literary Analysis Papers and Presentations

Authors construct stories using the same set of basic elements: setting, character, conflict, rise of action, climax, and resolution.  They also employ techniques or devices like pace; tone; description; point of view; dialogue; characterization and motivation; irony; figurative language; style; and format.  Different authors, and even the same author with different works, emphasize some of these elements and techniques over others to affect the reader, to deliver the theme of their individual works.

 

The assignment:

FIRST:  Read a significant novel carefully enough to analyze its elements and theme.

SECOND:  Write a complete essay structured according to the guidelines summarized here:

 

Title Reflects Your Subject And The Essay’s Thesis (don’t underline your title!)

 

 

Attention-getter (vivid description, a quote, staggering statistic)

 

Give title, author, BRIEF summary of plot including terminology (name key elements—not all)

transition to thesis statement

Thesis statement on theme goes here (make sure it’s a complete thought)

 

 

 

State point of paragraph (reason thesis is true)

 

 

Support with evidence (properly formatted quotations from the literature)

Explain connections to thesis

 

 

 

 

State point of paragraph

 

 

         Support with evidence

         Explain connections

 

 

 

 

State point of paragraph

 

 

         Support with evidence

         Explain connections

 

 

 

 

LINK to attention getter (remind reader of the essay’s beginning)

 

 

RESTATE thesis and possibly give another example, connect to your own experience?

TWIST—leave reader with an interesting/important/humorous thought relating to your subject—sometimes a quotation works well

 

 

 

Excellent papers and presentations will include discussions of the elements and techniques (see above) that contribute to the work’s effectiveness/development of theme.  I recommend that you provide these discussions in the body paragraphs, amidst your explanations for how specific evidence from the novel supports your thesis.  For example, does the passage you are using as evidence for theme also show the author’s skill and/or emphasis on characterization?  On description?  On figurative language?  On irony?  Does the format of the writing hint to the theme of the story?  Does the author’s choice of P.O.V. enhance the development of theme?  Analyses of the story’s elements can be offered briefly in the body paragraphs dealing mostly with theme, or an additional body paragraph or two analyzing the story’s elements may be added.  Just be sure not to stray from your discussion on theme (thesis) too long; get back to your thesis after discussing elements.

Sept 19--

Essay priorities:

  1.     Answer the prompt
  2.      Structure/coherence (stick to your thesis statement)
  3.       Build supporting paragraphs around textual evidence
  4.      Consider all valid angles/address counterclaims
  5.      Keep your reader with you—define key terms, lead into quotations/textual evidence, and provide context for each new supporting example
  6.   Stay focused on the material; don’t over-philosophize and definitely DO NOT PREACH!
  7.    NO 2nd person POV “you”
  8.      Show vivid examples in every paragraph—including the conclusion!
  9.     Answer the prompt!

Sept 18-- Short Story Connection Essay DUE THURSDAY.  50 pts.  Printed by the end of the period Thurs. and formatted according to the Formatting Model below (MLA guidelines):

Sept 17 Formatting Model (Formatting Mod.pdf)

SRI test:  https://h100000583.education.scholastic.com/slms/studentaccess

September 12th, 2018--

We are off to a great start.  THANK YOU to all students who have helped us get started moving forward by coming to class prepared and engaging in the lessons and materials.  And THANK YOU to support crews at home who have provided guidance and resources-- TEAMWORK :-)

We are gearing up to write our first major essay, the "Short Story Connection Essay."  Detailed instructions will come tomorrow; for now, enjoy reading and analyzing the stories we are reading together and keep your eyes out for the ONE that speaks to you best, the one you "connect" to best.  Make sure your "plot diagram" for that story is your best work, your most careful analysis and complete interpretation of "theme" (the important idea on how life tends to work, or not work, for us humans on Earth).  Go beyond a general truth to argue the how and the why behind the main truth.  For example, it’s too superficial to argue that a story shows "friendship" (or "family," or "perseverance," or "courage…"); you will only summarize the story and tack on repeated statements of that vague argument.  I want you to learn deeper analysis— how does the story show the importance of friendship?  Does it show what real friendship looks like?  Does it show what it takes to recognize a real friend versus a false one?  Do characters learn how to devote themselves to real versus false friendships?  How?  What are the obstacles/hindrances?  How are they overcome?  Does a person need to be taught what friendship really is?  How does that happen?  This assignment will be toward the end of September-- we will work on it in class several days and you will get more guidance.  For now, focus on each story as it comes and practice the best analytical skills possible.  Which one will relate to you and the lessons on life that your own experiences have taught you?  Read each new story with an open mind; look for the ONE.


English 8  2018- 2019

Mr. Wittman

Textbooks:  Main text will be McDougal Littell’s Language of Literature.  Students will read several novels, including The Pearl by John SteinbeckThe Pigman by Paul ZindelWalk Two Moons by Sharon CreechThe Diary of a Young Girl by Anne FrankThe Call of the Wild by Jack London and several short stories, including Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes.

Course Description:  I will teach you, with your cooperationJ, to interpret literature, to listen effectively, and to speak and write well.  You will demonstrate critical thinking and writing fluency by responding to daily journal prompts (a section of binder kept stocked with PLENTY of lined paper so that entries stay organized).  You will write in-class and out-of-class essays.  You will conduct formal research and write a paper using MLA format in January.  Start thinking now of an important person to research, one who changed life on Earth!  You will also make formal presentations.

Grading System:  Each assignment is graded on a point scale.  Students can earn between five and 15 points on most assignments.  Larger assignments, like essays, are usually worth about 50 points.

Homework:  You must copy assignments from the board into your assignment book each day.  You are required to read a substantial publication (no comic books or magazines lacking meaningful articles) for at least fifteen minutes during four of the seven nights in a week.  Record title, author, and a significant quotation for each reading session on your KBAR sheet.  Sheets are to be signed by a parent in hope that parents will become involved in their student’s reading habit.  A list of recommended titles is available, and I encourage students to improve their literacy by reading from it—extra credit will be awarded for reading these titles or equally significant titles that do not appear on the list (see me with book in hand).

Make-Up/Late Work:  Please see Lancer Handbook.  Note-- If absent on a due date, the assignment(s) will be due the day student returns.  AN AUTOMATIC 50% DEDUCTION WILL BE TAKEN FROM ALL LATE WORK.  KBAR logs are not accepted late.

Student Expectations: Bring two pencils and two DARK-BLUE OR BLACK BALL-POINT PENS (be nice to my eyes, please!), a binder with plenty of paper and dividers, an assignment book, and the appropriate literature text to class each day.  Students are required to keep notes and handouts dated and in order.

If you are going to be, or were, ABSENT

1.     Call or conference with your study buddy to get information on the classwork and assignments you missed.

2.     Check the website for handouts/assignments that you missed.

3.     Turn in any work that was due during your absence in the appropriate slot of the late work box at rear of room.

4.     Ask your study buddy for clarification on assignments and/or information BEFORE asking the teacher and not during a lesson.

5.     Check the board for new assignments and update your assignment book.

Feel free to approach teacher with questions during free moments (work time, after class, lunch, after school), NOT WHILE CLASS IS GETTING UNDERWAY.

 

 

Student’s full name ________________________Signature _____________________ Per#___

 

Parent Signature ______________________________ Date_______  (worth 10 pts., Assign #1!)


ALL STUDENTS-- Review the "Course Ourline" with your parent(s) and/or guardian(s).  Ask he/she/they to let me know that this happened; a quick email wwittman@slcusd.org, short note (in student's planner), or a printed and signed course outline (best) will earn you 10 points in the course-- easy $!  Due Friday, Aug. 24th.


Advanced English 7  2018 - 2019

Mr. Wittman

 

Textbooks:  Main text will be McDougal Littell’s Language of Literature.  Students will read several novels, including The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain, The Giver by Lois Lowry, and The Martian Chronicles by Ray Bradbury.  I urge you to use personal copies of these novels, books you can mark and annotate.  DO NOT READ THESE NOVELS FOR MONTHLY LIT. ANALYSIS ASSIGNMENTS!

 

Course Description: I will teach you, with your cooperationJ, to interpret literature, to listen effectively, and to speak and write well.  You will demonstrate critical thinking and writing fluency by responding to daily journal prompts (a section of binder kept stocked with PLENTY of lined paper—20 to 30 spare sheets at all times-- so that entries stay organized).  You will write in-class and out-of-class essays.  You will conduct formal research and write a paper using MLA format in January (Start exploring subject choices now!  He or she must be a significant, positive, researchable historical figure).  You will also make formal presentations.

 

Grading System:  Each assignment is graded on a point scale.  Students can earn between five and 15 points on most assignments.  Larger assignments, like essays, are usually worth 50 points.

 

Homework:  You must copy assignments from the board into your assignment book each day.  You will have something to work on every night.  Some assignments will be typical in that they will be assigned, collected, graded, and recorded within the course of a few days; others will be ongoing and cyclical, requiring you to manage your time carefully.  Examples of the latter type are the monthly critical papers and presentations, also the research paper.

        Speaking of the research paper… begin thinking (now!) of a few significant, positive, researchable historical figures who interest you.  Most living figures are not researchable or notably significant (there are exceptions, Bill Gates or Margaret Thatcher for example), so you probably should look into a dead person.  Don’t commit murder just so you can research your favorite celebrity.  Some extra credit may be awarded if you choose a literary figure, an important author.

 

Make-Up/Late Work:  Please see Lancer Handbook.  Note-- If absent on a due date, the assignment(s) will be due the day student returns for full credit.  Submit make-up work, late work, and returned work for which you dispute the grade to the “IN BOX” at rear of room; label it accordingly (AB, L, R).  AN AUTOMATIC 50% DEDUCTION WILL BE TAKEN FROM ALL unexcused late WORK.

 

Extra Credit  Opportunities spring up occasionally (e.g. lists of words and definitions taken from the vocabulary of assigned readings submitted the day after the reading, and any exceptionally insightful, complete, and/or professional work).  Recognize opportunities along the way and make the most of themJ.  Extra assignments to boost a grade are not offered; please don’t ask.

 

Student Expectations: Bring two pencils and two DARK-BLUE OR BLACK BALL-POINT PENS (no colored ink will get credit—especially not sparkly ink!), a binder with plenty of paper and dividers, an assignment book, and the appropriate literature text to class each day (there will be book checks, and they will affect your grade!).  Students are required to keep notes and handouts dated and in order.

If you are going to be, or were, absent

1.     Call or conference with your study buddy to get information on the classwork and assignments you missed.

2.     Check the wall file upon your return for handouts/assignments that you missed.

3.     Turn in any work that was due during your absence in the appropriate slot of the late work box at rear of room.

4.     Ask your study buddy for clarification on assignments and/or information BEFORE asking the teacher and not during a lesson.

5.     Check the board for new assignments and update your assignment book.

Feel free to approach teacher with questions during free moments (work time, after class, lunch, after school), NOT WHILE CLASS IS GETTING UNDERWAY.

 

Student’s full name ________________________Signature _____________________ Per#___

 

Parent Signature ______________________________ Date_______  (worth 10 pts., Assign #1!)

 

Back to School Info handout 2018—Here we go!

Welcome.  Thank you for trusting me to teach your kids.  Thank you for your help in teaching them.  Tonight, I’d like to highlight:

·         some details of our KBAR program, which is ongoing and sometimes trips up the kids

·         the research project that begins in December so that you can prep and support your student

·          “Homework”

·         “Literary Analysis” essays and speeches (really just presenting a paper/essay) 7th grade only

 

 

KBAR—Reading log collected every two weeks.  10 pts each.  I expect students to read for at least 20 minutes each day/night; however, for KBAR, they should log FOUR reading sessions of at least 20 minutes on four different days per week.  The material can be almost anything, but there is a catch.  We want kids to want to read, and I’m interested in their choices, but the log must show a SIGNIFICANT quotation from each reading session on the reverse of the KBAR form.  This means that the reading material must contain significant material—Teen PeopleCosmogirl, and the like are not safe choices!  Reading award-winning and/or widely celebrated authors can earn one to 2 points of extra credit.  If we are in the middle of reading a novel, assigned reading can be logged for regular credit.     Please support this program!  It is fairly tedious, I know, to log reading sessions, to log anything, really, but this program is pretty cool.  All Laguna students have been taking part in it for decades here, and the theories behind it are neat:

1. You, your student, and your student’s teacher celebrate student’s reading

2. It offers repeated opportunities to get involved in the student’s reading and generate meaningful discussion

3. It shows that we care about reading.

Please buy-in, and please help your student buy-in!  KBAR!  YAY!

 

Research Project—Students can begin reading and taking notes now on the life story of any positive, significant, RESEARCHABLE person.  You might help them choose a subject now.  Buy-in is crucial!  They will learn the life story, study issues of the time period, and eventually argue an interesting point about the person and his or her place in history.  Help them make the leap from “report” to argument.  I don’t want a report.  Let’s make them think little harder.

 

“Homework” is mainly work not finished in class, KBAR reading AND LOGGING (this can be assigned reading done outside of class), and working on long-term projects and/or studying for tests.  Another GREAT use of time outside of class, and YOU could help immensely with this, is reviewing “mini essays” and any related notes done in class that day.  Talk with your student about the writing and discussion for the day and get them to show you (bribery?) the mini essay prompt and his or her response.  Just ten or fifteen minutes spent reviewing these writings and adding ideas (revising) goes a long way in reinforcing the learning and preparing them to write powerfully.  These mini essays are designed to move kids closer to the deeper themes of the readings and they give kids opportunities to reason through concepts I’ll be looking for in essay exams.  If a student manages his or her time well, 20-40 minutes should be the max for any night of homework.  If he or she complains that it’s taking longer, ask them if they used class time efficiently.  Reviewing instructions and focusing on moving through them one at a time can speed things up, too.  Don’t freeze up or give up!

 

Literary Analysis projects are basically theme essays on novels of the students’ choosing.  Five months out of the year (Oct, Nov, Feb, March, April) your student will choose a challenging and significant novel and analyze it throughout the first half of the month.  Then he or she writes, and rewrites/revises, a complete essay that argues his or her interpretation of the story.  I expect them to go beyond a cliché truth, to argue the how and the why behind the main truth they find.  For example, it’s too superficial to argue that a story shows the importance of friendship (or family, or perseverance, or courage…); the student will only summarize the story and tack on repeated statements of that vague argument.  I want them to learn deeper analysis— How does the story show the importance of friendship?  Does it show what real friendship looks like?  Does it show what it takes to recognize a real friend versus a false one?  Do characters learn how to devote themselves to real versus false friendships?  What are the obstacles/hindrances?  How are they overcome?  Does a person need to be taught what friendship really is?  How does that happen?      Details of these projects will go out on my website as we near October.

 

 KBAR log

SRI test (final):  https://h100000583.education.scholastic.com/slms/studentaccess

Update 5/23/18-  ALL CLASSES:  
due 6/4, 50 pts Final portfolio reflection assignment,  <word doc, or just look below:

Final Portfolio Reflection Questions

 

1.      From memory, list as many assignments in your portfolio as you can.  Check portfolio when done and complete the list (if necessary).

2.      Which is your favorite?  Why?

3.      Which was your least favorite?  Why?

4.       Which are you most proud of?  Why?

5.       Which was your favorite piece of literature this year?  Why?

6.       Who was your favorite character?  Why?

7.       Review all your work in your portfolio chronologically (earliest to latest).  List three interesting observations or changes in your writing.  Which are the most profound (obvious and important)?  Why?

8.       Look over your work and accompanying gradesheets.  List three writing skills you worked on this year.  Which is most valuable?  Which is most improved?

9.       List three essential skills for effective reading (think about all the steps you go through in understanding and making meaning from [interpreting] a piece of literature).  Which skill, or step, is most important?  Why?

Update 5/22/18--

8th graders:

Letter to Self

Due 5/30.  20 pts (completion grade)

You will be writing a letter addressed to yourself today (end of your 8th grade year) and it will be mailed to you during your senior year of high school. Be sure to write in your best print or cursive. Have fun with this! You’ll be excited to hear from your 8th grade self when you graduate!


Introduction/Family-suggested one paragraph

  • Explain this assignment- include the date and the year

  • Describe your family structure, where you live, siblings, family animals

  • What have you done with your family during holidays, vacations, birthdays, memorable moments this year


Favorites-suggested one-two paragraphs

  • Best friend(s) and why

  • Activities- what do you like to do in your free time

  • Music

  • Sports (if any)

  • Favorite social media channel/account/youtube videos/memes


Current Events-suggested one paragraph

  • Current movies

  • News around the community and world

  • Current trends (social media, fortnite, fidget spinners, other)


Self-suggested one paragraph

  • Your current personal strengths (caring, dedicated, responsible, good at…..)

  • Special talents (writer, swimmer, baker, etc.)

  • Your physical features (height, hair color, hair length, braces, glasses, etc.)


Goals-suggested two paragraphs

Within the next 4 years, what do you hope to accomplish

  • Academically

  • Activities in school (band, leadership positions, sports, yearbook, etc.)

  • Activities outside of school (church, groups, Boy Scouts, etc.)

  • Sports

  • Service to community (volunteer work, etc.)

  • Family relationships (closer to mom, etc.)

  • Personal character (more outgoing, independent, more secure, etc.)


Your Choice-suggested one paragraph

  • Include any other information that you wish

  • You may wish to include a letter from a friend, Laguna memorabilia (sticker, ASB card, etc.) in your envelope

  • End on a positive note

  • Sign your name!!


You should have a minimum of seven paragraphs when you are finished. Proofread! You get what you put into this assignment. Don’t disappoint your future you!


Do something today that your future self will thank you for!

Update 4/30/18--

https://h100000583.education.scholastic.com/slms/studentaccess


Update 4/18/18-- 

7th--

SLCUSD 7th  Grade District  Writing Assessment

Argumentative Essay

Your assignment

A group of parents and teachers in your school have made a proposal to the school board. In their proposal, they are suggesting that the school join in a national movement called “Shut Down Your Screen Week.” The parents and teachers in the group believe that not using any electronic media for an entire week would be good for students for many reasons.

They have taken the proposal to a teachers’ meeting so that teachers can discuss the issue of whether or not to ask their students to participate in the “Shut Down Your Screen Week.” The teachers have decided they would like to hear from the students before they decide. This is not a simple issue, so you need to think very carefully about it.


You have three texts to read relating to the issue: “Social Media as Community,” “Is Google Making Us Stupid?” and “Attached to Technology and Paying a Price.” As you read and re-read these texts, think about what they show you about the issue. Think about what position you will take and what evidence you will use to support your thinking. Finally, write an essay, in the form of a letter to the teachers, explaining your thinking.

In the essay, your focusing question is Should your school participate in the national “Shut Down Your Screen Week?”  Be sure to use evidence from the texts, as well as your own knowledge, to support and develop your thinking.

Argumentative Scoring

Your essay will be scored using the following criteria:

  • Purpose and Organization: Is the main idea clearly communicated? Is the essay clearly focused? How well did your ideas thoughtfully flow from beginning to end using effective transitions? How effective was your introduction and your conclusion?

  • Elaboration/Evidence: How well did you integrate relevant and specific information from the sources? How well did you elaborate your ideas? How well did you clearly state ideas using precise language that is appropriate for your audience and purpose?

  •   Conventions: How well did you follow the rules of grammar usage, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling?


You are being asked to write a multi-paragraph essay, so please be as thorough as possible. Remember to check your notes and your prewriting/planning as you write and then revise and edit your essay.


Article links http://farms.hartlandschools.us/subsites/Elizabeth-Bontekoe/documents/Wissner/Language%20Arts/Argument/Attached%20to%20Technology%20and%20Paying%20a%20Price.pdf

http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2008/07/is-google-making-us-stupid/306868


http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2012/02/12/the-advantages-and-disadvantages-of-living-alone/social-media-as-community


8th graders-- read "The Colonization of Baja Sur" and "Indigenous Groups of the Twentieth Century" and "Native Baja California Tribes in 2000" on the website http://www.houstonculture.org/mexico/baja.html

Update 4/9/18--

COMMON ROOT WORDS AND WORD ORIGINS

ROOTS

MEANING

WORD

alter

other

alternate, alter ego

ami, amic-

love

amiable, amicable

amphi

both ends or all sides

amphibian

ann, enni

year

anniversary, annual, biennial, perennial

anthrop

human, man

anthropology, anthropomorphic, misanthrope

aqua, aque

water

aquatic, aquarium, aqueduct

arch

chief, leader, ruler

archangel, monarch, archaic, archenemy

arthro

joint

arthritis

aud

sound

auditorium, audible, audiologist, audiotape

bell

war

belligerent, bellicose

biblio

book

bibliography, bibliophile

bio-

life

biography, autobiography, biology, antibiotic

brev

short

brief, abbreviate

cap

take, seize

capture, captivate, capacity

carn

meat

carnivorous, chili con carne

ced

yield, go

recede, secede, proceed, intercede, concession

chrom-

color

chromatic, monochrome, polychrome

chron-

time

chronicle, chronology, chronometer, synchronize

cogn

know

recognize, cognitive, incognito

cord/chord

cord

harpsichord

corp

body

corpus, corpse, corporal

crac, crat

rule, ruler

autocrat, democracy, bureaucrat, democracy

cred

believe

credible, credulous, credibility, credit, credo

cruc

cross

crucifix, crucial

crusta

shell

crustacean

crypt

hidden

cryptogram, cryptology, cryptic

culp

guilt

culpable, culprit

dei

god

deity, deify

demo-

people

demography, democracy, epidemic

dent

tooth

dentist, dentifrice, dentin

derm-

skin

dermatology, epidermis, hypodermic

dic

speak, say

dictate, predict, diction, indict

dox

belief, opinion

orthodoxy, paradox, heterodoxy

duc, duct

lead

induce, deduce, seduction, conduct, abduct

duo

two

duo

dynam-

power

dynamo, hydrodynamics

ego

self

egotist, egomania

equ

equal

equal, equity, equanimity, equate, equidistant

fac

make, do

manufacture, factory, benefactor

fil

threadlike

filament

frater

brother

fraternal, fraternize

gam-

marriage

monogamy, polygamy, bigamy

geo-

earth

geopolitical, geology, geography, geothermal

glyph

vertical groove

Hieroglyphics—Egyptian “sky writing”

grad, gress

step

gradual, progression, transgression

graph-

writing, printing

graphology, biography, telegraph, geography

gym

naked

gymnasium

gyn-

woman

gynecologist, androgynous

hemo, hema, hem

blood

hemophilia, hematology, hemoglobin

holo

whole, entire

holograph

hydro, hydr

water

dehydrate, hydraulics, hydroelectric, hydroplane

iso

equal, identical

isolate

ject

throw

inject, reject, subject, projection

jud

judge

judicial, judge, adjudicate

leg, lect

read, choose

legible, lectern, lecturer, election

liter

letter

literature, illiterate, literal

loc

place

local, location

log

word

monologue, epilogue

luc

light

lucid, elucidate

magn

large

magnify, magnate, magnificent

man

hand

manufacture, manual, manuscript

mar

sea

marine, mariner

mater

mother

maternal, maternity, matriarchy, matricide

mere

part, segment

mere

meta, met

behind, between

metacognition—behind the thinking

metri, meter-

measure

geometric, thermometer, odometer

min

small

minority, minuscule, minute

mit, miss

send

permit, submission, mission, emit,

mob, mot, mov

move

mobile, automobile, motion, promote, movie

mon

warn

premonition, admonition

mor, mort

death

mortal, mortician, immortality

morph

form, structure

metamorphosis, amorphous, morphology

mut

change

mutant, mutability, mutate

neuro

nerve

neurology, neurosis, neurobiology

nomen /nomin

name

nominal, nominate, nomenclature

nov

new

novel, renovate, innovation, novella

nym, onym

word, name

synonym, acronym, anonymous, pseudonym

odonto

tooth

orthodontist—one who straightens teeth

ortho-

straight, correct

orthodox, orthodontist, orthopedic

pac

peace

pacify, Pacific Ocean, pacifist

pater

father

paternal, paternity, patricide, patrilineal, patriotic

path

feeling, suffering

sympathy, apathy, empathy, telepathy, pathology

ped, pod

foot

pedal, pedometer, centipede, gastropod

pel, puls

push

pulsate, repulsive, impulse, compel, propel

pend

hang, weigh

pendulum, pendant, suspend, pending

phon-, phono-

sound, voice

telephone, euphony, cacophony, phonograph

plan

flat

planar, plantation, plane

pneum

lung

pneumatic

pod

feet

podiatrist

port

carry

portable, transport, portage, report,

pot

power

potent, omnipotent, potentate

psych-

soul, spirit, mind

psychology, psychic, psychobiography

pugna

fight

pugnacious, pugilist

quer, quis

ask

query, inquisition,

scent, scend

climb

ascend, ascent

schizo, schiz

division, split

schizophrenic

sci

know

scientific

sciss

cut

scissors

scrib, script

write

manuscript, scribe, proscribe, scripture

sec, sect

cut

dissect, section

sed, sess

sit

sedentary, session

sens, sent

feel, be aware

sensible, sentient

sequ, secu

follow

sequence, sequel, consecutive

serv

serve, protect

service

simil

same

similar, assimilate, simile, facsimile (fax)

siphon

tube

siphon

sol

sun

solar

son

sound

sonar, resonate, unison

soph

wisdom, knowledge

philosophy, sophisticated, sophomore (wise fool)

spec, spic

look, see

spectacles, spectator, inauspicious, prospect   

spir

coil

spiral

spir

breathe

inspire, respiration, conspire, perspiration

spond, spons

promise, answer for

respond, responsible

spont

by one’s own force

spontaneous

stat

stay, position

station

tang, tact

touch

tactile, tangible

temp

time

temporary, temporize

ten, tent

hold

tentative, tenable, tenuous

terr

earth

subterranean, terrain, terrestrial, disinter

theo

god, deity

theology, polytheism, atheist, monotheism

therm-

heat

thermal, thermos, thermometer

trophy

nutrition, food

atrophy—without nutrition

uro

urine

urologist

vac

empty

vacation, vacuum, vacuous, vacant

ven, vent

come, go

intervene, convene, contravene

ver

truth

veracity, verify, verity

vert

turn

introvert, irreversible, vertigo

vit

life

vital, revitalize, vitamin

voc

call

revoke, invocation, vocal, evocative, convocation

zoo

animal

zoo, zoology, zoolatry

PREFIXES

PREFIX

MEANING

EXAMPLES

a-, an-

not, without

amoral, anesthetic, apolitical, asocial

ab-

away from

abduction, abstain, abnormal

ad-

to, toward

adjoin, adjacent (lying near to)

ambi-

both

ambidextrous, ambivalent

ana-

up, back, again

analogy, anatomy, anagram

anti-

against

antipathy, antiwar, antisocial

apo-

from, away from

apology, apologize

auto-

self

autobiography, automobile, autocracy, automaton

bene-

good

benediction benevolent benefactor

cata-, cat-

down, against

catastrophe—a turning down

centro, centri-

around, center

concentric, centrifugal

circum-

around

circumlocution circumference, circumvent

com-

with, together

communal, community

con-

with, together

connect, confide conspire

contra-

against

contradict, contravene

de-

down, away

descend, deject (cast down)

dia-, di-

through, across

diameter, division

dis-

apart, not

disengage, discord, discomfort

dys-

ill, difficult, bad

dysfunctional, dysentery

e-

out of, from

elect (choose out of), eject (throw out)

ecto-

on the outside

ectoderm—outer skin

en-, em-

in

empathy—feeling in

endo-

within, inside

endoscope—instrument for observing inside

epi-

upon

epitaph epidermis, epicenter

eso-

inward, within

esoteric—more inward, esophagus

eu-

well, good

euthanasia—good death

ex-

out of, from

exhume, exhale, exodus

hetero-

other, different

heterosexual, heterodoxy, heterodox heterogeneous

homo-

same

homosexual, homogeneous, homogenized

hyper-

over

hypertension, hypersensitive, hyperactivity

hypo-

under

hypotension, hypodermic

il-

not

illegitimate, illicit, illegal, illegible

im-

not

imperfect, impolite, impossible

im-

into

imbibe (drink in, take in)

in-

not

indiscreet, invisible

in-

into

incorporate (take into the body)

inter-

between

intervene (come between), interstate

intra-

within

intrastate, intramural

ir-

not

irregular, irrational, irredeemable

macro-

large

macrocosm, macroeconomics

mal, male-

bad, evil

malediction malevolent, malnutrition

meta-

beyond

metaphysical

micro-

small

microscope, microcosm, microeconomics

mono-

one, single

monologue, monotheism, monarchy, monogamy

neo-

new, recent

neologism, neo-liberal, neonatology. neolithic

ob-

against

object, obstruct (build against)

palin-, pali-

back, again

palindrome

pan-

all, every

pantheism, Pan-Hellenic, panorama, pandemic

para-

beside, next to; beyond

paramilitary, paralegal, parachute

per-

through

percolate (flow through) perforate (punch through)

peri-

around

perimeter, periscope

phil-, philo-

like, lover of

philosophy, Francophile, bibliophile, philanthropy

poly-

many, several

polygon, polygamy, polytechnic, polytheism

post-

after

postgraduate, posthumous postpone

pre-

before

precede, predict (tell before)

pro-

for, forward

promote, project

pros-

toward, in front

prospect—view in front, something coming up

proto-

first

prototype, protoplasm, protobiology

pseudo

false

pseudonym, pseudoscience

re-

again, back

repeat, recede, regress (step back)

retro-

back

retrogression, retroactive

se-

away from

seduce (lead away), secede

sub-

under

submarine, subject, subhuman subterranean

sur-, super-

over, above

superhuman, superego, superintend, surpass

syn-, sym-, syl-, sys-

with, together

symphony, synonym, system, syllable

tele-

distant, far off

telephone, telepathy, television, telegram

trans-

across

transient, Transatlantic, transport (carry across)

SUFFIXES

SUFFIX

DEFINITION

EXAMPLE

-agog, -agogue

leader

demagogue, pedagogue

-cide

kill(ing)

patricide, infanticide, herbicide. suicide

-ectomy

cutting

appendectomy, splenectomy

-ia, -y

act, state

amnesia, mania, democracy, anarchy

-ic, -tic, -ical, -ac

having to do with

anthropomorphic, dramatic, biblical, cardiac

-ics

things having to do with

optics, physics

-isk, -iscus

small

asterisk—a little star

-ism

the belief in

pacifism, terrorism, socialism, communism

-ist

one who believes in

pacifist, terrorist, socialist, communist

-ite

one connected with

meteorite, polite, cosmopolite

-logy

study field of

biology, geology, etymology, cardiology

-oid

resembling, like-shaped

asteroid, spheroid

-or, -er

one who takes part in

doctor, actor, teacher, driver

-phobia

exaggerated fear

photophobia, claustrophobia, agoraphobia

-sis

act, state, condition of

analysis

 

Update 3/28/18--

7th--  Essay exam TOMORROW! (50 pts).  You will have one class period to respond to one of two prompts we have previously written to and discussed in class.  Review the bluprint for essay writing and strategize in order to write coherently within the time limit.  Review past mini essays, the book, and notes on the Twain documentary. You can access the book here (legally!  It's in the public domain:): http://www.planetebook.com/free-ebooks/the-adventures-of-tom-sawyer.pdf   For additional help tonight, visit the Sparknotes page and read through all of the "Themes, Motifs, and Symbols" sections: http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/tomsawyer/

8th--  Visit the Sparknotes page and read through all of the "Themes, Motifs, and Symbols" sections:     http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/twomoons/ 

Which analyses/ideas on the meanings in the book do you find most helpful and why?  Due Friday, 3/30 beginning of class.  20 pts.  1-3 solid paragraphs-- no more than that!

Update 3/19/18--

7th-- Mini essay prompt:

Re-examine the final paragraphs of chapter 28, Huck seems ambivalent (unclear on his position) about his view of Uncle Jake, and apparently of blacks in general.  Briefly summarize his opposing views.  How does this passage help a reader understand Twain’s most important themes in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer?  How might it be related to the announcements in the “Author’s Preface?”  Support all statements/ideas with specific evidence and complete explanation (circle back to statement as you explain).


Update 3/14/18--

8th grade:  

San Luis Coastal Unified School District

8th Argumentative Writing Prompt

STUDENT DIRECTIONS:

Research

Parents and teachers worry about the impact of celebrities on teenagers and their decision making.  Adults want positive influences to guide teenagers in their decisions about how to act, what to wear, how to dress, what to eat, etc…. Are celebrities good role models?


The Impact of Celebrities:

  • Are teens too passionate about celebrities?

  • Do you think celebrities change the behavior of teeangers in a positive or negative way?


State your position on the positive or negative influence you feel celebrities have on teenagers.  As you develop your claim, utilize the research material provided to support your position. Be sure to elaborate on any quotations you included in your essay.


You have three texts to read relating to the issue:


As you read and re-read these texts, think about what they show you about the issue. Think about what position you will take and what evidence you will use to support your thinking. Finally, write an essay explaining your belief about the following question:

Be sure to use evidence from the texts, as well as your own knowledge, to support and develop your thinking.  Remember that this is an argumentative essay, so be sure to address opposing arguments and points of view.

Writing the Essay


You are being asked to write a multi-paragraph argumentative essay, so be as thorough as possible and include comments supported by evidence from the sources. Remember to check your notes and your outline as you write and refer to the articles as often as you like.  


Argumentative Scoring


Your essay will be scored using the following criteria:


  • Purpose and Organization: Is the main idea clearly communicated? Is the essay clearly focused? How well did your ideas thoughtfully flow from beginning to end using effective transitions? How effective was your introduction and your conclusion?

  • Elaboration/Evidence: How well did you integrate relevant and specific information from the sources? How well did you elaborate your ideas? How well did you clearly state ideas using precise language that is appropriate for your audience and purpose? Did you address opposing arguments and points of view? Did you cite the evidence properly?

  • Conventions: How well did you follow the rules of grammar usage, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling?


Update 3/7/18----
7th-- Print one of these Neoclassical thought vs. Romantic thought and dates (for use with The Adventures of Tom Sawyer)

Feb. 13, 2018--

8th-- Once you have finished presenting your research paper and have turned in a clean copy, it's time to research a controversial topic of your choice so you can take an informed position on it.  You will then write a persuasive speech and deliver it to the class beginning Feb. 27th.  We will use the same order we did for research presentations.  See gradesheet below for assignment info.

8th graders: If you are having trouble finding a persuasive speech topic, check out the MANY discussed in our weekly vocabulary bank: http://wordgen.serpmedia.org/t_weekly2016.html

Persuasive Speech Gradesheet

__ / 10 INTRO:  Begin with interesting statement or fact, maybe a vivid description (not “I did my speech on…”).  Give brief background (what are you talking about and why is it important?) and clearly state your position (thesis statement—what should we believe, or what should be done?).

__ / 30 SUPPORT:  Support your position with convincing facts (cite sources for key facts—tell us where you found the info).  Explain your points completely—connect facts/examples to your thesis. ADDRESS COUNTERCLAIMS:  Anticipate, explain, and answer audience concerns/counterarguments.  CONCLUDE: Wrap-up by revisiting your opening and thesis, then finishing with a final argument, suggestion for action, or interesting/funny thought related to your argument.

__ / 10 DELIVERY/POISE:  Hold audience’s interest with good volume, eye contact, posture, and flow (use of visual aid might help us get your point, and you might get extra credit)

MEET TIME LIMIT, THREE TO SEVEN MINUTES.  Two points deducted for every 30 seconds over or under.

Feb. 2nd, 2018--

Term paper reflection

 

Think of the thoughts and experiences you had as you moved through each phase of the project we just finished (nearly two months long!).  List the phases (choosing the subject, beginning reading/research/notes).  What important lessons did you learn regarding how you:

1)      made choices and began to act in first few phases

2)      developed a strategy for producing the products (paper and speech with board).  How well did you incorporate the materials (resources on my website) and instructions in your strategy?

3)      Managed your time during the course of the many weeks leading up to your due date.

 

Presentation reflection

 

1)      List three important lessons you learned from watching others present (consult your notes).  Explain how you will use what you learned in the future.

2)      List three important lessons you learned while preparing and delivering your own speech.  Explain how you will use what you learned in the future.

3)      List three important lessons you learned from reviewing your grade and teacher comments.  Explain how you will use what you learned in the future.

Jan. 30th, 2018--

Richard Lanham's "Paramedic Method" for revising prose-- USE IT!  Make every sentence of your paper concise and lively, VIGOROUS!

Vigorous writing is concise.  A sentence should contain no unnecessary words, a paragraph no unnecessary sentences, for the same reason that a drawing should have no unnecessary lines and a machine no unnecessary parts.  This requires not that the writer make all his sentences short, or that he avoid all detail and treat his subjects only in outline, but that every word tell.    --William Strunk quoted in E.B White’s introduction to Strunk and White’s The Elements of Style Macmillan, 1959 (first printed in 1935).

 

Steps 1 through 5 of Richard Lanham’s Paramedic Method from Revising Prose Macmillan, 1992.

1.       Circle the prepositions

2.       Circle the “is” forms

3.       Ask, “Where is the action?” “Who is kicking who?”

4.       Put this “kicking” action in a simple (not compound) active verb

5.       Start fast—no slow windups

 

“Lard Factor”= the percentage of words eliminated from original sentence.  Divide total number of words in the original sentence into number of words removed.

Examples:

 

Original sentence from the conclusion of an essay on Anne Frank:

 

 

 

 

 

Where’s the action?

 

 


Original sentence from an autobiographical essay

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Original sentence from the same essay

 

 

 

 

 

 Original sentence from a research paper

 

 

 

 

Original sentence from a research paper

 So all in all I would say that Anne is a nice girl with good and bad qualities.

 

This sentence suffers from a slow start.  Watch what happens when you cut it:

Anne is a nice girl with good and bad qualities.  Better—more concise.  Eight words eliminated, so… 8 ¸18 = .44  LF =44%

 

Answer: nowhere!  Give your subject an action:

Anne holds grudges, but shines overall.  Sentence makes a valuable point, referring to specifics and stating a stronger opinion.  12¸18=.67 LF =67%

 

I then looked back at the bush and stared closely at it and noticed that there were huge thorns covering the whole bush!

 

Huge thorns covered the whole bush!  LF=74%  I know this happened after the event described earlier, so “then”  can go.  I know this is the writer’s observation, so “I” and “looked back…stared closely…and noticed that there were” can go.  The action, “…were…covering,” is compound (more than one word) and passive—make it active: “covered.”

 

So I took a bite out of it and it literally exploded in my mouth, releasing temperatures that seemed to soar over 10,000 degrees. 

 

The 10,000 degree berry filling exploded in my mouth.  LF=63%  Think carefully about the action; the berries burning his mouth grabs attention and makes the point better than “So I took a bite…”  The berries rule this sentence, not the writer and his bite!

 

Stowe would not stop now until she had completed her task of convincing as many as possible that slavery was a terrible and malignant truth, and Americans were listening.

 

Americans heard Stowe’s convincing argument against slavery. LF 76%  The important action, Americans influenced by Stowe’s work, is emphasized.

 

One reason that parents should stop being super involved in their children’s lives when they are in middle school is because it can affect their ability to be independent when they are older.

 

Simple fix: Just remove the “One reason that,” and the “is” before the “because.” LF 12%

 

Better fix: Children learn self-reliance in early adolescence, and parents’ excessive meddling hinders that learning.  Notice the actions in the sentence and how they show the most important points.  LF 61%

 

Jan. 22nd, 2018--

It's time to draft and revise the paper!  Each class period this week will be devoted to drafting, revising, and editing your paper-- make it a great piece that you will be proud of years later :-).  Consult all of the resources below and build a solid, well-developed paper on your subject.  The final draft will be due Jan. 26th.  Presentations will begin the following week, beginning Feb. 2nd (you will get your own individual due date assigned to you on Wednesday, Jan. 24th).

Jan. 17th, 2018--

Lots of good help with writing here (note the paramedic method handouts)-- http://owl.english.purdue.edu/sitemap/ 
Go to "Academic Writing" > "Strong Thesis Statements"  for help with "MLA formatting," "research," "Academic Writing" > "Essay Writing" > "Argumentative Essays"

Take a gander at one of my old papers if you like:

Postcolonial Thought and Seamus Heaney’s “The First Kingdom”