Sandlot Observatory (mpc - H36)


2009 & 2013 Recipient of The Planetary Society's
 

Shoemaker NEO Award.

The 2009 grant funded the purchase of a new  STL1001E  CCD camera from SBIG.   The 2013 grant funded 2 new faster computers and updated software.    A rousing thanks to The Planetary Society for helping to fund Near Earth object follow-up and NEO recovery at Sandlot Observatory. 
  http://planetary.org/programs/projects/neo_grants/grants_2009.html
http://www.planetary.org/blogs/bruce-betts/saving-the-world-shoemaker.html



Abell GC 1656 with distant quasar

(click on image to enlarge)


This image was taken 01-29-11 with the .56 meter 'Little Blue' reflector at Sandlot Observatory . The marked quasar  HB89  is thought to be 11 billion light years distant. 


National Public Radio interview about Sandlot Observatory
(6-14-12) CLICK HERE


2 more comets are recovered at Sandlot. Click here  and here for  details.

Click on the images at left for a larger view. 
M51 (left) and M8 (right) were both BVR (photometric filters) tri-color images using 5 minute integrations for each filter. The new STL1001E Camera was used for these images.

I am a member of the Northeast
Kansas Amateur Astronomer's League.

        

I was the principal investigator for a NASA-sponsored Near Earth Object Follow-up Program for 3 years at our club's observatory
( Farpoint )
using the Tombaugh reflector and a SBIG STL1001 e  CCD Camera.

garyhug@ksmail.net

Nearly 5,000 NEO observations were turned 
into the Minor Planet Center (MPC) by  Farpoint's Asteroid Search Team (FAST) .
The FAST team  were all members of the Northeast Kansas Amateur  Astronomer's League.   For more on my current NEO and comet research click here.


Recently I built a 0.56 meter reflector (nicknamed the Little Blue 22) and placed it in my backyard observatory 'Sandlot'.   The telescope is driven with A SiTech  Servo drive system. 
    
The Potentially Hazardous Asteroid found at Sandlot is linked to a PHA from 2004.


Left:  Sandlot Observatory with the LB22 telescope raised at sunset .  The telescope
 barely fits in the 10' x10' observatory with a motorized roll-off roof. It is surrounded by
brome
pasture.
 



In March 2009, The Topeka Capital Journal newspaper presented a story on Sandlot Observatory.