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  • Andrew Tattersall
    February 27, 2014
  • Uzzie Laubscher
    January 10, 2012

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ScHARR Bite Size are lively, informal 20 minute taster sessions held at Regent Court with a focus on staff development. Run by the ScHARR Staff Development Group, Bite Size has been running since 2010 and has run over 70 sessions on everything from social networks to how (not) to display data. The sessions all begin at 12.30 on various days of the week and are open to any members of staff and students from the Medical Faculty and beyond.
 Bite Size cakes are provided and there's always time for a quick ten minute discussion and Q&A afterwards. Staff can add the Bite Size calendar to their own calendar by typing: scharrbitesize@gmail.com into their list of additional calendars.
Please join us, what have you got to lose?....20 minutes of your time.

PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS LATEST SERIES STARTS AT 12.30





ScHARR Bite Size Calendar of events



How often do you ask a colleague: “How are you doing?” and get the reply: “I’m really busy”. In this modern and demanding world we all seem to be busy with pressure to meet deadlines, fit in meetings which invariably lead to more work; and try and manage our ever spiralling collections of professional and personal content, whether it be electronic data or physical artefacts.


All this work and no play quite often means we have neither the time nor the inclination to learn about new developments and ways we could work better. Being in this constant state of busyness leads to a reluctance to commit even an hour, let alone half a day for a training session, but what about 20 minutes in the middle of the afternoon?

At the School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR) at The University of Sheffield there is an innovative series of informal 20 minute sessions that are about planting seeds and changing minds. The sessions have two clear strands, one focused on teaching and the other on research. The remit is not to teach people how to use something in their work or study but to let them know why they should use it and how they can employ it. It is hard to teach someone an idea or technology in just 20 minutes, but by showing them the possibilities in an enthusiastic delivery you can send them away with at least the intention to explore and experiment.







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