Resources

Here are links to resources at other schools.  Most of this information comes from the NetVUE conference we attended in March 2015.
  • Three schools that have very well-developed vocation programs are Nebraska Wesleyan, Benedictine University (Illinois), and Hope College (Michigan). At the NetVUE conference, their provosts provided overviews of these programs.
    • Listen to a podcast of the plenary session (note: a pop-up window will appear. In the middle of it, right-click and choose to allow Microsoft Silverlight to run the program)
    • See their slides (which make more sense if you listen to the podcast)
    • Transcript of talk from Nebraska Wesleyan. 

  • Elizabethtown College NetVUE presentation.  

  • Point Loma Nazarene University NetVUE presentation
    • These slides give a brief overview of their 4-year program for vocational discernment. They have a dropbox site where you can see: 
      • assignments and assessment rubrics for a psychology class;
      • NetVUE grant proposal;
      • 4-year plan:  1st year: introduce vocation; 2nd: weave it into co-curricular programs; 3&4: vocation in the major, preparing for careers; post-graduation resources

  • Our Lady of the Lake College NetVUE presentation
    • Look at this presentation especially for their pre-grant data collection and assessment efforts and their strategies for getting the vocabulary of vocation across campus (without having a standard definition of vocation)
    • See also their vocation "calling card"

  • SOPHIA (Sophomore Initiative program) at Assumption College (Boston)
    • Our NetVUE grant is loosely based on theirs
    • Cohort of 24 sophomores who live together and have assigned faculty mentors. They have common coursework, fall and spring retreats, and monthly meetings. They are also eligible for summer grants
    • See the last few slides, where they discuss a draft proposal to integrate students' educational experience

  • Co-curricular initiatives presentation at...
    • Furman (Greenville, SC)
      • FOCUS program for sophomores - travel to Ireland. They also have three focusing questions: 
        • Who am I, most authentically?
        • What do I believe most deeply?
        • What does the world need from me?
      • They also have vocational programming for faculty, staff, alumni and the community (see their slides)
      • They have the Cothran Center for Vocational Reflection
    • Benedictine University
      • SOAR program for student-athletes (largely focused on career development)
    • University of St. Francis
      • Living your call: small group based vocational discernment
      • Their model: hearing, understanding, and then obeying the call (see slides)
      • This provides an interesting model for year-long small group discussion lead by faculty/staff

  • Trinity Christian College (Palos Heights, IL) NetVUE presentation
    • Interesting example of a vocation program in a business school.
    • Their program is structured around 4 questions, one for each year; prior to advising, students prepare "career statements" in response to these:
      • 1st: Who Am I? Why Am I Here? What Will I Do This Year?
      • 2nd: What’s Important To Me? What Do I Offer the Marketplace?
      • 3rd: What Does the Marketplace Offer Me?
      • 4th: The Job Search, What Do I Want From the Marketplace

  • Bluefield, Hope, and Loras NetVUE presentation
    • Hope: they introduce vocation in 1st-year seminar. 
      • Revised learning objective: Students will learn about the purposes of a liberal arts education, including personal and intellectual development as well as vocational discernment and career preparation (Sound like LEAP?)
      • They also used StrengthsQuest, required a liberal arts essay, and provided time for "depth" in academic advising
    • Loras: see slides 13-16 for a description of their program that focuses on: 
      • PD for faculty and staff to integrate vocational discernment into the advising process;
      • Create a sophomore experience event that focuses on vocation stories from young alumni; and
      • Establish a curricular home for vocational discernment

  • Edgewood College (Madison, WI) NetVUE presentation
    • COR program for vocational development through the general education curriculum. Divided into three main stages:
      • First-year seminar – exploration and liberal arts
      • Sophomore/Junior – integrative experiential component
      • Senior –capstone experience in the major
    • Their three questions:
      • Who am I and who am I becoming?
      • What is my role in building a more just and compassionate world?
      • What are the needs and opportunities of the world?
    • See their slides for specific learning outcomes!

  • Trinity University (San Antonio) NetVUE presentation
    • Describes their efforts at engaging 1st year students in vocational discernment 
      • Focuses on what facilitation is and how it works, with references to literature. Goal: "sneak up" on students rather than ask big questions directly.
      • "Advising puppy" exercise
    • Reflections seminar material (warning: 116 pages of project description!)

  • Paul Wadell talk on "What good mentors do", given at the 2013 regional NetVUE conference at Fontbonne.
    • Wadell explores the role of a mentor and discusses how friendship, properly conceived, is a good theoretical model for the mentor relationship. He draws upon multiple resources, most notably the work by Sharon Parks (Big Questions, Worthy Dreams).

  • Sharon Parks' keynote address at the 2013 National NetVue conference

  • Montreat College's Calling and Career Week
    • A week-long series of 5 workshops devoted to developing a theological understanding of calling and career by bringing in multiple speakers.
    • If part of the QEP plan involves bringing in speakers, we may want to take a look at the list of people that they used.

  • Manchester University (Indiana) Career Services website
    • This site has terrific links to articles about the concept of vocation as well as ideas for helping students discern their vocation. See this article in particular for questions to use during advising.
    • Although it's long, (31 pages) it's worth taking a look at the "Roadmap for transforming the College to Career Experience" "crowdsourced" paper from Wake Forest. It describes programs at a variety of institutions, although the focus is tilted heavily towards "career".
    • Finally, take a look at Manchester's vocational map, which is similar our efforts.

  • Goshen College has a "faith mentoring program" described in this brochure
    • Although faith mentoring and mentoring for vocation are distinct, they are related; see esp. the "doing" section.
    • See their PPT slides for extensive research on alumni about faith mentoring - lots of assessment data here!
    • One shared insight from the conversation group at the NetVUE meeting is that mentoring for vocation may be less about specific practices and more about attitude and being open. Maybe we need to have intentional groups of faculty and staff to support each other so that they can be equipped or ready or in the right mental space to spend time with students.

  • Gustavus Adolphus College's Center for Servant Leadership
    • One of the founding members of NetVUE, visits to their campus have helped other institutions (e.g., Elizabethtown College) begin their own programs.
    • See especially their Resources for mentors, which has 
      • a "life in the making map" for helping students to structure their college experience; and 
      • an extensive mentoring handbook/guidebook

  • Big Questions: Many schools have three questions that organize their vocational discernment programs; I have compiled a few of them here.

  • University of St. Mary (Kansas) QUEST program
    • Their program is focused around three questions: (a) who am I; (b) what are my gifts; (c) what is God calling me to do?
    • See the link for details; most notably they embedded these questions into athletics. There were weekly coach meetings where the quest questions were explicitly discussed and taught to students. As one faculty member put it, "without athletics, you are spinning your wheels."

  • Augustana College CORE program
    • Their program ties together Advising, Career development, Service-Learning, Entrepreneurial Center (comm arts: communications, marketing and creative services – students provide services to businesses & organizations), Internships, Study “away” (primarily study abroad), Vocational exploration. All housed in one building.
    • Two interesting ideas:
      • Co-curricular transcript – tracks experiences in academic enrichment, campus leadership/involvement, honors and awards, and volunteering
      • Viking score – a list of career-services activities, ordered by year, for students to complete

  • Bill Millard's Life calling developmental model
    • This 5-year model may help us with a conceptual framework for our plan.

  • Monmouth College
    • They had faculty/staff Vocation discernment "circles" / ICE (integrating campus efforts) committee, which includes discussion of language used across campus / conversations about vocation & mission
    • The "circles" themselves consisted of 5-8 students, who would meet for 3 sessions, or 5-8 faculty for 5 sessions. Their bio dept got together to talk about how they can help students struggling in Bio 101.
      • They realized that, at least for faculty, community-building was an integral part of vocational discernment. Several faculty members said that the community they found by being a part of the circle was much-needed.
      • One idea: they asked, "what's one thing you would like to change about your community, & tell a story that illustrates why you say that." In their 5th session, they discussed these.
      • Facilitator notes for how to run these discussion circles

  • Alvernia NetVUE presentation
    • Warning: their slides lost some content. Scanned versions coming soon!

  • Samford University & The College of Wooster NetVUE presentation
    • details soon..

  • Capital University NetVUE presentation
    • Lessons learned from their Peer Vocation Mentoring Program
    • Five components of vocation at Capital:
      • Staff/Fac retreats centered around Big Questions, Worthy Dreams
      • Student retreats based on Spiritual Quest
      • Faculty Chair position
      • Embedded elements
      • First year seminar vocation component
    • See their discussion of language surrounding vocation and Vision/Reality slides
    • See also their "compass leaders" (student peer mentors)
    • Resources:

  • Stories of Learning website
    • "The Stories of Learning project seeks to promote classroom voices about the development of students as thinkers and learners." Although this site focuses on middle school and high school, there may be resources here that we can use (particularly with 1st-year students?).

  • Discernment Deck
    • The Discernment Deck is intended to help wanderers, seekers, and doers figure out (or “discern”) what it is they’re called to do, and who it is they’re called to be. The questions are divided into four areas: Self, Relationships, Choices, and Vocation. Read them to yourself and then reflect on them either alone or with a group.

  • A beautiful reflection on choosing a major - worth sharing with students.

  • Deloitte Generational Study of Millenials on the purpose of business