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7.15.2009

Morgan Jon Fox one of Filmmaker Magazine's 25 New Faces of Independent Film

OMG/HaHaHa
"Memphis-based Morgan Jon Fox is still getting comfortable with the label of being the voice of the YouTube generation. Since premiering his third feature, OMG/HaHaHa at NewFest in New York City last June, his low-tech improvised/Web cam/quasi-documentary hybrid of a group of gay, straight and transgender Memphis teens has struck a chord with young festivalgoers as well as critics. The film has taken home Best Feature awards at both the Memphis Indie Fest as well as the Chicago LGBT Film Fest. "I did not think this was a film that anybody would like, to be honest with you," says Fox, 30. "I thought it would be something that the people involved and people that I had inside jokes with would get. It would be something to watch at parties."
CONTINUE READING

3.20.2009

"The Unlikely Story of OMG/HaHaHa"

Written by Chris McCoy -"The Intruder" Blog Writer (livefrommemphis.com)

"It's the Titanic of Indie Memphis." That's what film critic Elvis Mitchell called Morgan Jon Fox'sOMG/HAHAHA as he awarded it yet another of the six prizes the film won at the 2008 edition of Indie Memphis. Since then, the film has been wowing audiencesand juries on two continents, winning the Reeling 2008 festival in Chicago and inviting comparisons to Larry Clark's groundbreaking 1995 film Kids from critics in London, where OMG/HAHAHA is currently screening at the Bradford International Film Festival. "It's funny, because when I finished it, I thought it would be a rinky-dink little project," Fox says. "I thought, 'I'm going to enjoy this, and it's going to be fun, but it's a big, experimental mess that's not going to be well received at all.'"

3.10.2009
BunnyLand, picked up by The Documentary Channel

"The Documentary Channels original series DOCTalk, presents Bunnyland. In the mountain resort of Pigeon Forge, Tennessee, 73 rabbits are found slaughtered at a miniature golf course. Nearby, a small rental cabin catches fire, killing its only occupant. Connecting these two events is amateur archaeologist Johnny Tesar, the self-proclaimed last Indian on the Trail of Tears. Johnny claims to have discovered an ancient civilization, and has collected thousands of stone artifacts to support this assertion. His bizarre scientific theories have generated controversy for decades, and the relics themselves continue to attract skeptical curiosity seekers. But in Johnnys microcosm of friends and enemies, it is even more difficult to discern all the facts of legal battles, spiritual alliances, and unexplained deaths. *Premiered at 2008 Nashville Film Festival"






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