Selig Asked to Consider Legacy in Second Request for Meeting

 

Save the Hall of Fame Game                                                Contact:

Kristian Connolly
savethefamegame@gmail.com


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Commissioner Selig Asked to Consider Legacy in Second Request for Meeting in Cooperstown Next Month

WASHINGTON, DC (June 27, 2008) -- The SaveTheFameGame.com campaign today sent its second letter to Major League Baseball commissioner Bud Selig requesting a meeting while the commissioner is in Cooperstown for the Hall of Fame's Induction weekend from July 25-28.

In part, the letter states: "
The Hall of Fame Game is a tradition that began during Hall of Famer Kenesaw Mountain Landis' term as the first baseball commissioner, and has continued through the terms of every Major League Baseball commissioner since, which includes Hall of Famers Happy Chandler, Ford Frick and now, Bowie Kuhn. Please consider the positive effect that saving the Hall of Fame Game would have on your legacy as commissioner, and the goodwill it would create among baseball fans both young and old, both now and in the future."

In the original two-page letter sent to the commissioner on June 20, Mr. Selig was asked for "the opportunity to discuss with you the passion that exists for keeping a great American and baseball tradition alive ... and have an open discussion about options for retaining Major League Baseball's participation in the Hall of Fame Game, as it has been since 1940."

Mr. Selig responded briefly to that letter but did not address the request to meet in any way.

Full text of SaveTheFameGame.com's second letter is reprinted below, and a PDF version, as well as the original two-page letter from SaveTheFameGame.com and Mr. Selig's response to that letter, can be found in the "Press Releases" or "Letters" sections of the web site.

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Text of SaveTheFameGame.com's second request for a meeting with Commissioner Selig

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June 27, 2008

Mr. Allan H. (Bud) Selig, Commissioner   
Major League Baseball   
777 East Wisconsin Avenue             
Suite 3060                               
Milwaukee, WI 53202

Dear Commissioner Selig:

Please consider this second request for a meeting with you in Cooperstown during the upcoming Induction Weekend of July 25-28 to discuss the Hall of Fame Game and its future.

As stated in the first request, a letter dated June 20, I would like the opportunity to discuss with you the passion that exists for keeping a great American and baseball tradition alive, share some of the sentiment that is out there with regard to the choice that the league and the players union made in deciding to end it, and have an open discussion about options for retaining Major League Baseball's participation in the Hall of Fame Game, as it has been since 1940.

In an article from 2006, you told MLB.com, following your chat with fans during the All-Star break: "I love talking to fans. It gives me a greater appreciation for what people think, what their problems are, what they'd like us to do." So please take this opportunity to do listen to what fans think about the decision to end a nearly 70-year-old tradition, and what they'd like you to do about it.

A reporter covering this story recently told me that he had asked a high-ranking official at the Hall of Fame whether he thought the Hall of Fame Game could be saved, and the official's response was that baseball is a $6 billion per year industry, so no. That captures exactly what all of us who care deeply about the sport feel like we are up against, whether we're talking about the Hall of Fame Game or some other aspect of the national pastime that is being corrupted or trashed by money, selfishness, and greed.

The Hall of Fame Game is a tradition that began during Hall of Famer Kenesaw Mountain Landis' term as the first baseball commissioner, and has continued through the terms of every Major League Baseball commissioner since, which includes Hall of Famers Happy Chandler, Ford Frick and now, Bowie Kuhn. Please consider the positive effect that saving the Hall of Fame Game would have on your legacy as commissioner, and the goodwill it would create among baseball fans both young and old, both now and in the future.

Thank you for your time. I look forward to the opportunity to further discuss these issues with you in Cooperstown next month.


Sincerely,


Mr. M. Kristian Connolly