Barrington Middle School's 8th grade

INFORMATION AND LINKS 
FOR THE CORE CLASSES: 
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Reading:

Students are expected to read for 30 minutes 
each night in their independent reading books.

Reading uses a Google Classroom Website 
to share assignments and information.  Go to classroom.google.com and click onto the 
student section. Use the following codes:

Class

Code

A Block

[codes are pending]

B Block


C Block


D Block


E Block


 
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Math:

 Information pending - check back soon!
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ELA: 

Generally speaking, "homework" as such is not assigned in ELA. If students want a better grade, however, they will likely find they have to do work outside of class to generate enough XP. 

The trimester grade is determined by the amount of XP (experience points) accumulated over the course of 12 weeks: 
225    XP                       =     D- (passing)
300                                =     D
600                                =     C
900                                =     B
1400                              =     A
1800 XP is required for an A+.

Follow this link to see a list of the "quests" (optional specific assignments) that are currently open. 

This chart lists the minimum XP needed each week to be on track for specific grades: XP Minimums Chart

Info about the "Kingdom of Diddorol" game overlay, including the 6 Traits writing rubrics used to assess student work, can be found on the Diddorol.com website here

If you have questions about assignments, the class, etc, feel free to email Mr. Graykin.

LATE WORK

Quests have specified deadlines, as do the occasional mandatory assignments. I do accept late work (though there is a reduction in total XP earned), but I only accept late writing in physical form--that is, a paper turned in to the bin in the classroom. Generally speaking, late work will not be accepted electronically (via email, Google Docs, etc.).
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Science:

CLICK HERE for an "flashcards" app that reviews the key terms in our new textbooks, look for iScience Life, iScience Physical, and iScience Earth/Space.

Science uses a Google Classroom Website to share assignments and information.  Go to classroom.google.com and click onto the student section. Use the following codes:

Class

Code

A Block

m32qq9

B Block

jxrqzh

C Block

9cp4vke

D Block

519wkw6

E Block

4uko95h

 
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Social Studies:
 
Social Studies uses a Google Classroom Website 
to share assignments and information. Go to classroom.google.com and click onto the 
student section. Use the following codes:

Class

Code

A Block

atq0by

B Block

b616k11

C Block

px4dc5

D Block

7ailef

E Block

pj5w94j

 
CHILD DEVELOPMENT: 
Your 8th grader
Excerpts from this article
Middle adolescence is a time of blossoming development – the insecure, inwardly focused 13-year-old becomes a cheerful, charming 16-year-old looking toward the future. During this time your child’s thinking skills take a decidedly adult turn, his body matures, and friends and social networks outside the family become increasingly important. Now is when you will really begin to get a glimpse of the adult your child will become.

Physical Development

Boys and girls still exhibit markedly different levels of physical maturity as they enter middle adolescence. Girls’ rapid growth is generally tapering off, while many boys have yet to see the beginning of their much anticipated growth spurt. By the end of this period most girls will be near their adult height; boys may continue to grow until age 18 or 19.

Intellectual Development

Between 13 and 16 your child’s ways of thinking about himself, others, and the world shift to a much more adult level. He enters middle adolescence with a focus on things he can experience here and now, and moves to being able to imagine the range of possibilities life holds. Expect the following changes as a progression of development rather than as age-based milestones:
  • arguing skills improve (and are demonstrated often and with great passion)
  • reasoning skills improve:
    • begins with the ability to apply concepts to specific examples
    • learns to use deductive reasoning and make educated guesses
    • learns to reason through problems even in the absence of concrete events or examples
    • becomes able to construct hypothetical solutions to a problem and evaluate which is best
  • focus on the future develops:
    • begins with a present focus, mixed with some fantasy
    • learns to recognize that current actions can have an effect on the future
    • starts to set personal goals (and may reject goals set by others)
  • decision-making skills improve:
    • begins to independently differentiate right from wrong and develops a conscience
    • learns to distinguish fact from opinion
    • learns to evaluate the credibility of various sources of information
    • becomes able to anticipate the consequences of different options
    • may challenge the assumptions and solutions presented by adults

Social & Emotional Development

During this period your child will continue to be an emotional pendulum: happy and at ease one year, troubled by self doubts the next. These swings will smooth out as your teen approaches the end of high school and gains more confidence in his own independence.

13-Year-Olds

  • uncertain, unhappy, and sensitive
  • withdrawn; spends a lot of time alone; needs privacy
  • convinced that everyone else is watching and judging
  • very concerned with body image
  • self-esteem at a low ebb
  • not sociable with adults
  • friendships tend to be group-focused; more squabbling than a year ago

14-Year-Olds

  • generally happy and easy-going
  • recognizes own strengths and weaknesses
  • finds many faults with, and is embarrassed by, both parents
  • likes to be busy and involved in many extracurricular activities
  • social circle is large and varied; includes friends of both sexes
  • very anxious to be liked
  • interest in the opposite sex is strong

15-Year-Olds

  • may be quarrelsome and reluctant to communicate
  • strong desire for independence; wants to be free of family
  • relationship with siblings may be better than with parents
  • friends are very important; may have one or two “best friends”
  • dating and romantic relationships are commonplace

And Finally…

Remember that growth and development are influenced by many factors – including genetic, social, and cultural – and that each child is an individual who will develop at his own pace. The milestones presented here are averages; your child may progress more quickly or a little more slowly.