Ms. Girolimon's English classes

Welcome!
SYLLABI and GRADING POLICY for English 10 Accel and AP Lang and Comp are copied at the bottom of this page. They are also linked as PDF documents on the webpage for each course. 

During the 2017- 2018 school year I am teaching English 10 Accelerated and AP Language and Composition.

email= lauren.girolimon@sau41.org

All course materials and information can be found on Google Classroom. Please go to your course website, linked on the left, for GOOGLE CLASSROOM login codes. I only use this website over the summer.

My goal for all of my students is to provide learning experiences that support the core values of HBHS: 

- Integrity
- Intellectual Curiosity
- Innovation
- Individuality
- Involvement in HBHS community

English 10 Accelerated Course Description

Ms. Girolimon 2017- 2018

lauren.girolimon@sau41.org

Room 225



Course Description


Welcome to English 10 Accelerated! This is an accelerated language arts course in which you will continue to hone your abilities in reading, writing, vocabulary, research, and grammar. Our reading list includes an introduction to selected classic and contemporary literature, including the genres of the short story, novel, drama, and poetry.  Our study of literature emphasizes more sophisticated methods of literary analysis, including the literary analysis essay. Composition work is expanded to include a variety of formal and informal essays, across a variety of genres, including in-class, timed writing exercises. You will also develop and practice communication skills through regular class discussions and presentations. Additionally, you will be participating in a grade-level speech unit to practice oral communication.


Class Components


Vocabulary: Students will use the Sadlier Oxford vocabulary program, Level E. Typically, units will be studied bi-weekly, with a quiz every other Friday.


Discussion/ Participation:  Discussion and participation go hand in hand. Participation means taking part in what is occurring in the classroom each day. The momentum of the class will be determined by student involvement so come to class prepared to listen to your peers and to contribute your questions, thoughts, and ideas to the class conversation.  Entering into a conversation is important to hone analysis skills and to strengthen writing ability.


Writing:  Students will write on a regular basis for a variety of purposes. Some writing assignments will require multiple drafts and peer conferencing. Others will be timed and completed entirely in class.

Homework:  Homework will be given nightly and will mainly consist of reading assignments (about 15-20 pages of reading per night), and may also include test and quiz preparation, writing, and research.  If homework is submitted for a grade, it may be turned in one day late for half credit.   


Notebook/ Journal:  You will need a separate, one subject notebook or composition notebook for writing exercises. This will be submitted to me on a regular basis.







Absence Policy


Upon being absent, it’s the student’s responsibility to inquire about work missed.  At that time, the student and I will discuss an appropriate timeline to turn in missed work.


Deadlines and Due Dates

Please turn in all work by the specified deadline. This is the expectation for all assignments, but it is especially important for papers and projects. Failure to turn in a paper, project, or other large assignment will result in parental notification. Extensions on larger papers and projects may be granted on a case by case basis. Please talk to me as soon as your think an extension may be necessary. Any homework or small assignments will be accepted up to one day past the deadline for half credit and then will not be accepted.


Grading


Reading: Class work and quizzes directly related to what we’re reading 20%


Writing: Formal and informal essays, as well as the steps in the writing process (outlining, drafting, revising, editing) writing journals, etc. 50%


Listening/ Speaking: Formal discussions such as Socratic Seminars; Speech Unit presentations; other presentations or select group work 20%


Language: Vocabulary program exercises and quizzes; grammar exercises and quizzes 10%


Midterm and final exams are each worth 10% of the semester grade.



Extra Help/ How to Reach Me

Please see me during CavBlock in room 225 whenever you need additional assistance. The best way to reach me outside of class is by email (lauren.girolimon@sau41.org).












Academic Integrity

Cheating and/or plagiarism is presenting someone else’s words, ideas, or information as one’s own or giving unauthorized assistance to someone else’s work. Unless authorized by me, the following examples are considered cheating:  using notes on a test or quiz, looking at someone’s paper and using their answers or ideas, having someone else write a paper for you (including papers from the internet), copying someone else’s homework or letting someone copy your homework, giving or receiving answers on any assignment, allowing someone to copy your work of any kind, and/or presenting information from the internet as your own and not giving credit to the source.


From the HBHS Student Handbook:

“The consequences of [cheating and/or plagiarism] are as follows:

-       On the first offense, the student’s parent and/or guardian will be notified, the student will receive a

zero for the work in question, and the student may jeopardize eligibility for the National Honor

Society.

-       All subsequent offenses during the student’s entire tenure at Hollis/Brookline High School will be

considered on a case by case basis.” (9)


Please note that all teachers will be using software to check students’ work for potential plagiarism or improper citations.  For further information see: www.turnitin.com



Course Materials

Core texts that may be used include:


Bradbury, Ray                                Fahrenheit 451

Coelho, Paul                                 The Alchemist

Doyle, A. Conan                  Short Stories:  Sherlock Holmes

Gaines, Ernest                      A Lesson Before Dying

Golding, William                        Lord of the Flies

Keyes, Daniel                                Flowers for Algernon

Kidd, Sue Monk                          The Secret Life of Bees

Knowles, John                             A Separate Peace

Miller, Arthur                               All My Sons

Moore, Wes                                    The Other Wes Moore

Paton, Alan                            Cry the Beloved Country

Shakespeare, William      A Midsummer Night's Dream

Shakespeare, William              Julius Caesar

Shakespeare, William             Much Ado About Nothing

Stevenson, R.L.                        Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde

Stork, Francisco                     Marcelo in the Real World

Wakatsuki Houston, Jeanne Farewell to Manzanar

Watson, Larry                              Montana 1948

Wilder, Thornton                       Our Town





*In addition to this list we will be studying a number of different short stories and informational pieces as they relate to a novel or play.  The film versions of the novels/plays listed above found in the HBHS library will also be utilized. Additional video materials from a variety of sources, the majority of which will be informational pieces that directly relate to our current reading selection, will also be used to supplement instruction.








AP English Language and Composition

2017- 2018


Instructor: Lauren Girolimon

Contact: lauren.girolimon@sau41.org

Room: 225



Course Overview  


The Advanced Placement English Language and Composition course is an eleventh grade English course designed to produce skilled readers of writing from a variety of rhetorical contexts and effective writers who compose for a variety of purposes. The texts studied are primarily nonfiction and are from a variety of authors and historical contexts. Students will read essays, speeches, letters, journalistic exposes, and articles from different genres to unpack the use of rhetorical devices and to examine different writing styles. Students will read and write across genres including narration, description, exemplification, comparison and contrast, cause and effect, and argument, to closely examine author’s craft and style, and to develop their own craft and style. Students will also practice writing in the three styles required on the AP language and composition exam; rhetorical analysis, synthesis, and argument. Time will be devoted to preparation for the AP English Language and Composition Exam, which is on Wednesday May 16, 2018.


My goal in teaching this course is for students to develop curiosity and desire to participate in, and to better understand, the world in which we live. My hope is that they will understand that reading and writing critically, thoughtfully, and frequently are skills and habits not only needed in the classroom, but more importantly in the world they will enter upon graduation.

Course Goals


In this course, students will develop and hone the following skills:

  • Read from a variety of historical periods and disciplines

  • Practice close reading to understand the writer’s choices

  • Identify audience, purpose, and rhetorical strategies in texts

  • Analyze the types of arguments that writers use

  • Write formally and informally for a variety of audiences

  • Write formal, informal, and timed essays in a variety of genres and for a variety of purposes

  • Understand their own writing process and the importance of revision

  • Recognize techniques in visual as well as verbal arguments

  • Synthesize ideas and information from various sources

  • Use conventions of standard written English to develop personal voice and style

  • Use format and structures appropriate to the rhetorical situation

  • Use writing and reading for inquiry, learning, thinking, and communicating

  • Understand the relationships among language, knowledge, and power

Course Components


Writing: Students will write on a daily basis for a variety of purposes. Writing can be broken down into three categories:

  • Quick writes or journal style entries which may include responses to reading or planning for upcoming discussions and/or class activities. These may be graded.

  • Longer, in-class and outside of class essays that follow the writing process from brainstorming through the final draft. Students will receive grades along the way, as well as on the finished product. Styles may include narration, description, exemplification, comparison and contrast, process analysis, cause and effect, and argument.

  • Timed, in-class essays to mimic the conditions and style of the AP Language and Composition Exam (rhetorical analysis, synthesis, and argument). These essays are scored using the AP College Board rubrics.

  • Mini-assignments to practice craft and style.


Discussion/Classwork and Participation: Expect daily discussions to unpack the rhetoric and style of what we read. We’ll also discuss responses to timed essays, both those written by students in this class and College Board samples, as well as multiple choice question sets. Some discussions will be scored, such as Socratic Seminars, fish bowls, or Harkness style discussions. Others will be informal and unscored. The momentum of the class will be determined by student involvement so come to class prepared to listen to your peers and to contribute your questions, thoughts, and ideas to the conversation. Entering into a conversation is critical to success in the course.


Vocabulary and Grammar: This course uses Level F of the Sadlier Oxford Vocabulary program. We’ll also review grammar and language structures that will help you hone your voice and craft as a writer.


Exam prep: Students will complete timed, in-class essays and multiple choice passages in preparation for the AP exam.



Course Policies


Absences and make-up work: You have as many days to make up your work as you had excused absences, per the HBHS Student Handbook.


Late Work: Late work receives a 10% deduction for each day late. After one week the grade becomes a zero. Deadline are essential to success in the course.


Cell phones: Should not be visible or used during class. Use of cell phones will negatively affect your classwork and participation grade (outlined below).


Plagiarism: Instances of plagiarism will be dealt with according to the HBHS handbook. This includes parental notification, administrator notification, and loss of credit for the assignment. Additionally, scouring the internet for help with assignments is strongly discouraged, as you are only doing yourself a disservice.


Homework: Homework will mainly consist of reading in preparation for the next class. You need to do the reading in order to participate in class. You can expect discussions, writing, and reading checks that are scored and will gauge completion and understanding of reading assignments.



Grading

Students will be graded using both formative and summative assessment. Formative assessments are practice, and include any learning experiences or assignments which help you form or refine skills.

Summative assessments include “final” assessments on what was learned, such as final drafts of papers, presentations, Socratic Seminars, tests/ quizzes, or projects.


Formative (40% total)

  • Classwork and Participation (Informal exam prep such as multiple choice and timed essays, informal discussions, or other class activities) 20%

  • Drafting, journaling, quick writes, and discussion prep (some of which may be assigned for homework) 20% (Labeled “Writing Process” in PowerSchool)


Summative (60% total)

  • Formal exam prep (multiple choice and timed essays) 20%

  • Final Drafts, presentations, Socratic Seminars/ graded discussions, projects 30% (Labeled “Final Products” in PowerSchool)

  • Quizzes 10% (mainly from the Sadlier-Oxford vocabulary program)


Midterm and final exams are each worth 10% of the semester grade, per HBHS policy.




Materials

Each student needs:

  • A binder, accordion folder (my recommendation), or other means by which to organize course materials. Keep everything until the exam!

  • A notebook to be used as a “think book” for quick writes, journals, and other written work. You’ll be handing this in regularly.

  • A notebook to be used for course notes.

  • Post-it notes.




Thematic Scope and Sequence


This course is centered around thematic units that are guided by essential questions. Units include readings from a variety of authors and contexts, some of which are outlined below. Each unit will include the course components that are listed in the section above. Timelines are flexible and approximate.



SEMESTER 1


Unit 1: I Protest: An Introduction to Rhetoric and the AP Exam

Essential Question: How does one find one’s voice?

September- October


Texts and Selections:

  • Chapters 1 (Introduction to Rhetoric) and 2 (Introduction to Close Reading) in The Language of Composition (course textbook)

  • Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (summer reading)

  • Maria Stewart, Lecture Delivered at the Franklin Hall

  • Harriet Ann Jacobs, from Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl

  • Chisun Lee, American Splendor

  • Paul Laurence Dunbar, The Race Question Discussed

  • W.E.B. Du Bois, from The Souls of Black Folk

  • Martin Luther King Jr., Letter from Birmingham Jail

  • George Orwell, Politics and the English Language

  • Gloria Anzaldua, How to Tame a Wild Tongue

  • Richard Rodriguez, Aria: Memoir of a Bilingual Childhood

  • Amy Tan, Mother Tongue

  • Sherman Alexie, Superman and Me

  • Malcolm X, Literacy Behind Bars



Skills and Tools:

  • Introduction to and practice with AP style multiple choice questions

  • Introduction to and practice with AP style timed writing (argument, synthesis, and rhetorical analysis)

  • Introduction to various rhetorical frameworks (Jolliffe’s Rhetorical Framework; Intro to the Six-Part Argument: Exordium, Narration, Partition, Confirmation, Refutation, and Peroration; Traditional Canons of Rhetoric)

  • Annotation 101

  • Mini- “Voice Lessons” on diction, syntax, and tone

  • Mini-lessons on grammar

  • Review of and practice with the genres of writing/ styles of arrangement



Unit 2: The Natural World

Essential Question: How do we relate to the natural world?

November


Texts and Selections:

  • Henry David Thoreau, Walden

  • Rachel Carson, The Obligation to Endure

  • Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nature

  • Brenda Peterson, Growing Up Game

  • Barbara Kingsolver, A Good Farmer

  • Wendell Berry, National Endowment for the Humanities 2012 Jefferson Lecturer, “It All Turns On Affection”

  • Selections from The Language of Composition (course textbook)


Skills and Tools:

  • Practice with AP style multiple choice questions

  • Practice with AP style timed writing (argument, synthesis, and rhetorical analysis)

  • Application of rhetorical frameworks

  • Mini- “Voice Lessons” on diction, syntax, and tone

  • Mini-lessons on grammar

  • Practice with the genres of writing/ styles of arrangement



Unit 3: Humor and Satire

Essential Question: How does satire challenge and question the beliefs of the audience?

December


Texts and Selections:

  • Judy Syfers Brady, Why I Want a Wife

  • David Sedaris, Me Talk Pretty One Day

  • Jonathan Swift, A Modest Proposal

  • Selections from The Language of Composition (course textbook)


Skills and Tools:

  • Practice with AP style multiple choice questions

  • Practice with AP style timed writing (argument, synthesis, and rhetorical analysis)

  • Application of rhetorical frameworks

  • Mini- “Voice Lessons” on diction, syntax, and tone

  • Mini-lessons on grammar

  • Practice with the genres of writing/ styles of arrangement








SEMESTER 2


Unit 4: Community and the Individual

Essential Question: How do individuals find their place in the world?

January- February


Texts and Selections:

  • Virginia Woolf, A Room of One’s Own (selection)

  • Jonathan Edwards, Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God

  • Henry David Thoreau, On the Duty of Civil Disobedience

  • E.B. White, Once More to the Lake

  • Barbara Kingsolver, Stone Soup

  • David Sedaris, Us and Them

  • David Sedaris, Go Carolina

  • Helena Norberg-Hodge, The March of the Monoculture

  • Margaret Fuller, from Summer on the Lakes, in 1843

  • Nicolo Machiavelli, The Prince

  • Henry David Thoreau, Resistance to Civil Government

  • William Raspberry, The Handicap of Definition

  • Selections from The Language of Composition (course textbook)


Skills and Tools:

  • Practice with AP style multiple choice questions

  • Practice with AP style timed writing (argument, synthesis, and rhetorical analysis)

  • Application of rhetorical frameworks

  • Mini- “Voice Lessons” on diction, syntax, and tone

  • Mini-lessons on grammar

  • Practice with the genres of writing/ styles of arrangement




Unit 5: The American Identity and Popular Culture

Essential Question: How are belief systems represented throughout history in literature, art, music, sports, and television?

March- the AP Exam in mid- May


Texts and Selections:

  • Deborah Tannen, Connections

  • Ellen Goodman, In America, It’s Work First and Play Never

  • John Leland, Pursuing Happiness in Our Time

  • Additional readings from Signs of Life in the USA: Readings on Popular Culture for Writers, by Sonia Maasik and Jack Solomon, and other sources. This theme is broad so that material can be tailored for the needs of the class leading up to the AP exam.

  • Selections from The Language of Composition (course textbook)


Skills and Tools:

  • Practice with AP style multiple choice questions

  • Practice with AP style timed writing (argument, synthesis, and rhetorical analysis)

  • Application of rhetorical frameworks

  • Mini- “Voice Lessons” on diction, syntax, and tone

  • Mini-lessons on grammar

  • Practice with the genres of writing/ styles of arrangement



Unit 6: The American Dream: A Sample of U.S. Literature

Essential Question: Is the American Dream still alive?

Post AP exam- June


Depending on the availability of texts, we will read one or two novels from this list, as well as some short stories and poems:

  • The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald

  • The Catcher in the Rye, by J.D. Salinger

  • The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne



Course Texts (Please do not purchase any of the texts unless asked to do so. Many will be provided to you.)


Each student will be provided with a copy of The Language of Composition: Reading, Writing, Rhetoric, by Renee H. Shea, Lawrence Scanlon, and Robin Dissin Aufses.  


Please purchase: Thank you for Arguing, by Jay Heinrichs (the edition with a blue cover and a carrot)


Books may include:

  • Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, by Frederick Douglass

  • Where am I Wearing? A Global Tour to the Countries , Factories, and People That Make Our Clothes, by Kelsey Timmerman

  • Walden, by Henry David Thoreau (selections)

  • The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald

  • The Catcher in the Rye, by J.D. Salinger

  • The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne


Essays, articles, poems, and short stories:

  • A sample of these materials are listed above under Scope and Sequence





Teacher Resources

Readings and assignments may be derived from the following teacher texts:

  • Everyday Use: Rhetoric at Work in Reading and Writing, by Hephzibah Roskelly and David A. Jolliffe

  • The Seagull Reader, Third Edition, edited by Joseph Kelly

  • Grammar in Practice Sentences and Paragraphs, by Lesli J. Favor

  • The Thompson Reader, by Robert P. Yagelski

  • Writing in America: Language and Composition in Context, by David A. Joliffe and Hephzibah Roskelly,

  • The Art of Voice: Language and Composition, by Gilbert H. Muller and Melissa E. Whiting

  • Frames of Mind: a rhetorical reader with occasions for writing, by Robert DiYanni and Pat C. Hoy II

  • Signs of Life in the USA: Readings on Popular Culture for Writers, by Sonia Maasik and Jack Solomon

  • The Norton Field Guide to Writing with Readings, by Richard Bullock and Maureen Daly Goggin

  • Voice Lessons, by Nancy Dean

  • Image Grammar: Using Grammatical Structures to Teach Writing, by Harry Noden

  • They Say, I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing, by Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein



AP Exam Prep Resources:

Students may wish to purchase one of the many AP Language and Composition Test Prep books that are available to consumers. The Princeton Review, Barron’s, or McGraw Hill are recommended. Additionally, if you are interested in purchasing books that serve as writing resources, please see me for suggestions.




Schedule 2017- 18

Period 1- English 10 Accel.
Period 2- AP Lang. & Comp.
Period 3- AP Lang. & Comp.
Period 4- Prep
Period 5- Prep
Period 6- English 10 Accel.
Period 7- English 10 Accel.

All classes + CavBlock are in room 225.