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I can be reached at trevor.duval@sau41.org

To sign up for parent conferences, please following the following link.  http://www.signupgenius.com/go/mrduval

Parents, please note, I use the Google Classroom as my digital platform.  As currently configured, only those with sau41.org accounts have access to its contents.  If you would like to see what is happening, you will need your son or daughter to log on to their Google Classroom account.  All students are required to sign up for the class webpage.  There is a Google Classroom app available for download onto your phone / tablet / computer (but of course it is not a requirement) 

The site is used to:
  • Post daily / weekly lessons plans
  • Post copies of assignments, notes and links
  • Students will summit assignments digitally 
  • Use as a classroom discussion board at times
If you need to meet with me at any other time during the year, please contact me so we can work at a time that works best for all. 
Civics

Course Guidelines and expectations can be found in the folder at the bottom of the page. 

Students should plan on a quiz every other week, and a class discussion on the none-quiz weeks.  

From the 2018-19 Program of Studies:

H221. Civics Gr. 11 .5 Credit Semester 

Civics is a required semester course for juniors that examines the important relationship between the people and their government. This course engages students in the study of the origins of our U.S. Federal and NH State governments, including the structure of each, their functions and the relationship they share. Students will investigate different political ideologies and the methods and outcomes of political participation. Students will also examine their own role in the political arena and the ways in which they may make a positive impact through active civic involvement. In addition, students will learn of the rights and responsibilities that all citizens have and share. Finally, students will engage in a media literacy component by evaluating the effectiveness of the media through a variety of sources, including political cartoons, print and broadcast media. 


Note: Civics: Honors-by-Contract (Weighted Course) Students enrolled in Civics have the option of receiving Honors Credit by completing an independent project throughout the semester that amounts to approximately 20% additional work to that expected for non-honors credit. While topics of independent projects will depend on individual student interests, they should relate to the study of Civics. A student who is working on an Honors-by-Contract project will be expected to conduct independent research and synthesize the resulting body of knowledge into a finished product that may entail, but is not limited to a research paper, project, original product, presentation, performance, or demonstration. To be eligible for Honors Credit in Civics, students must agree to the terms outlined in a contract determined by the Social Studies Department at the beginning of the semester.






A.P. U.S. Government and Politics : 18-19

Course Guidelines and expectations can be found in the folder at the bottom of the page. 

Summer work can be found on Google Classroom  as it is our primary website this year.     Copies can also be found below. Students will need to check out a copy of the We The People text book from the HBHS Library

Goolge Classroom AP Government Class code:  

Period 5:  tsevmu

Sign up for Turn It In – Summer work must be uploaded to Turn It In by due date above

Class code18221776                                              

Enrollment KeyConstitution

AP Students will be expected to take an AP Goverment and Politics exam in May / June.  It will be the College Boards in May, or an exam I created as a final exam.   

From the 2018-19 Program of Studies 


H258. Advanced Placement U.S. Government & Politics 
Gr. 12 
1 Credit Full Year 
Weighted Course Prerequisite: Recommendation of 11th grade teacher and/or permission of Department Chair (Social Studies) 

This intensive college-level course provides an analytical and critical perspective on the concepts, methods, and ideas of government and politics in the United States. The dual-focused approach involves both the historic and philosophical foundations of constitutional government, the creation of the 52 Constitution, the organization of American Government, civil liberties and the expansion of rights over the past 225 years. While students study general concepts used to interpret American politics, this course presupposes familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. political reality. Students will analyze and interpret case studies, philosophies, and ideologies of both classical and contemporary political thought and apply those principles to classroom discussion, debate, and written works to better understand their role in the political arena. (Students who enroll in this course will be required to complete a summer assignment prior to the start of class and take part in the We The People hearing in Concord, NH in December.) 

Note: Successful completion of the AP U.S. Government and Politics exam may entitle the student to receive college credit, depending on the individual college and the test score. Students are expected to take the AP U.S. Government and Politics exam at the end of this course for a fee of approximately $95, payable to College Board. Financial assistance is available to those who qualify for SAT waivers.
Contempary Issues 


Course Guidelines and expectations can be found in the folder at the bottom of the page. 

This class is about students teaching students the on going issues we face today.  Class discussion and active student engagement is critical for student success. 

From the 2018-19 Program of Studies

H253. Contemporary Issues Gr. 11-12 .5 Credit Semester 

Students who take this semester-long course will examine current events in local, national, and international news through discussion, formal debates, individual and collaborative projects and research and writing. The class will focus on media literacy, understanding media bias and thinking critically about various news sources. Topics covered may include politics, race relations, energy issues, advancements in technology, energy and environmental issues, global and regional conflicts, the death penalty, abortion, gun control, sexism, and class issues. Assignments include individual work and research, group projects, and class debates. Newspapers, news magazines, news segments, and documentaries will provide the basis for study. 


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