Math Units: Learning Goals and Co-Constructed Success Criteria

Current Unit: Patterning and Algebra


Learning Goals: Firstly, we are learning to describe linear patterns and relationships, using multiple representations (e.g.,  equations, table of values, graphs, models/pictures, words, numbers). Secondly, we are learning to identify and apply algebraic situations in the real world. Thirdly, we are learning how to select the right tools and strategies to solve real-life problems using  patterning and algebra. Finally, we are learning to communicate our thinking and justify our conclusions.


Success Criteria


  • I can solve simple algebraic equations by substituting variables (letters) for constants (numbers).

  • I can create a table or a graph that can show relationships between different numbers or events.

  • I can show pattern rules or linear relationships  in multiple ways (ex. algebraic equations, graphs, table of values, models, words, or numbers).

  • I can select the right tools and  use different strategies (e.g., mental math, inspection (isolate variable)  or the systematic trial (guess and check/test) to solve linear equations.

  • I can describe different ways in which algebra can be used in real-life situations (e.g., speed, heart rate, cell phone rate).

  • I can evaluate algebraic expressions and equations with one variable.

  • I can explain and justify my thinking when solving a problem.

  • I can use a table of values  and show my steps to solve an algebraic equation.

  • I can determine the unknown or variable in an algebraic equation.

  • I can use tiles and pictures to model algebraic expressions

  • I can understand that any letter (x,y,z) is a variable that can change

  • I can understand that a constant number does not change

  • I can use a table of values to solve an algebraic equation that involves rate of change



April/May Unit: Fractions, Ratio, Rate, and Percent


Learning Goals:

Firstly, we are learning to represent fractions as different things: parts of regions, parts of sets, parts of measures, division or ratios, and percents. Secondly, we are learning to recognize which representation -- fraction, decimal, or percent, rate, ratio -- is more useful in which situation. Thirdly, we are learning how to identify and apply proportional and non-proportional situations in the real world. Fourthly, we are learning how to select the right tools and strategies to solve problems involving proportional thinking (fractions, rate, ratio, percent).  Finally, we are learning to communicate our thinking and justify our conclusions.



Co-Constructed Success Criteria: What does success look like and sound like?

I can draw fractions as different things.

I can use multiple models and strategies to compare and add/subtract fractions.

I can simplify fractions.

I can correctly convert between percents, decimals and fractions.

I can explain the difference between rate and ratio.

I can calculate an equivalent ratio.

I can determine a unit rate.

I can tell when to use a fraction, rate, ratio, or percent.

I can calculate an amount from a percent and a percent from an amount.

I can change improper fractions to mixed numbers and vice versa.

I can connect fractions, rate, ratio, and percent to the real world.

I can use the most appropriate tools to solve problems that involve fractions, rates, ratios, and percents.

I can explain my thinking and justify my solutions.



Integers


Learning Goals: We are learning to represent, order, and compare integers.  Also, we are learning how to add and subtract integers, with and without the use of manipulatives (tools).  In addition, we are learning to make connections between life and integers. Lastly, we are learning to use integers to represent situations and solve problems.


Co-Constructed Success Criteria: What does success look like and sound like?


Success Criteria

  • I can show how to use the zero principle to add and subtract integers.

  • I can tell if an integer is less than or greater than another integer.

  • I can tell the difference between negative and positive numbers.

  • I can order positive and negative integers on a number line.

  • I can show positive and negative numbers using a variety of tools.

  • I can connect and apply integers to the real world.

  • I can use the rules for adding and subtracting integers.

  • I can select the right tools (materials) and strategies (plan) to add and subtract positive and negative numbers.

  • I can justify and explain my reason when solving real-life problems involving integers.

  • I can apply different strategies (number line, counters, mental math, calculator, etc. ) to add  and subtract integers.

  • I can use integers to represent a variety of items e.g., temperature and debt.


Current Unit: Geometry


Learning Goals: We are learning to classify 2D and 3D shapes, and explore similar and congruent shapes. Also, we are learning to construct lines, describe the location of a point or object on a coordinate grid,  and move objects using 4 types of transformations. Lastly, we are learning to solve problems involving geometry.


  • I can sort and classify 3D and 2D shapes

  • I can tell which 2D and 3D shapes are congruent or similar.

  • I can draw and measure different angles.

  • I can identify and classify triangles by their sides and angles.

  • I can identify acute, obtuse, right, straight, and reflex angles.

  • I can identify and draw different lines like intersecting, perpendicular, and parallel lines.

  • I can construct angle bisectors and perpendicular bisectors.

  • I can plot points using all four quadrants of the Cartesian coordinate plane.

  • I can move objects using 4 types of transformations: reflections, translations, rotations, and dilatations (dilations).

  • I can select the right strategies and tools to solve problems involving geometry.

  • I can apply the skills I’ve learned to new situations.

  • I can explain and justify my thinking, using appropriate math language.



Previous Unit: Area, Surface Area, Volume


Learning Goals: Firstly, we are learning that our world contains objects that can be measured. Secondly, we are learning to tell the difference between 2D and 3D shapes.  Thirdly, we are learning to develop and use formulas for area, surface area and volume. Finally, we are learning to solve real-life problems involving area, surface area, and volume.



What does the success criteria look like?


Success Criteria:  


1) I can develop and use the formula for the area of: parallelogram,

triangle, square, rectangle, and a trapezoid.


2) I can show my thinking and explain my strategies using pictures, numbers and/or words.


3) I can calculate the surface area and volume of right prisms, including rectangular and triangular prisms.


4) I can describe objects using different measurements.


5) I can describe the characteristics (edges, vertices, and faces) of a right prism.


6) I can solve problems involving the surface area, area, and volume of objects.

 

7) I can tell the differences between 2D and 3D shapes.


8) I can estimate and calculate the area of composite (2 or more shapes put together) two-dimensional shapes by breaking the shapes into smaller shapes.


9) I can convert between metric units, for example metres to kilometres


10) I can communicate my thinking and justify my answer.


September Unit: Factors, Multiples...

Learning Goals:  Firstly, we are learning to understand how our brains work.  Secondly, we are learning to collaborate and work well in groups. Thirdly, we are learning to classify and represent numbers.  Finally, we are learning to use strategies and steps to solve problems in different ways.


Co-Constructed Success Criteria: What does success look like and sound like?

  

I can calculate square roots and perfect squares.


I can use different strategies to find factors and multiples of numbers.


I can figure out the  LCM and GCF of two numbers efficiently.


I can use BEDMAS or the order of operations to solve equations.


I can justify my solution and show my work, using pictures, numbers and words.


I can tell if a number is prime or composite.


I can use a variety of tools, clues,  and strategies to find the solution to a question or problem.


I can write numbers using base, exponent, and power.


October/November Unit: Data Management


Learning Goals: We are learning to collect, organize, display, describe and analyze primary and secondary data. Also, we are learning to solve problems involving data management, using a variety of strategies.


Success Criteria:

I can tell the difference between biased and unbiased.

I can organize and display data by creating different types of graphs.

I can analyse data and graphs to make inferences/conclusions and convincing arguments.

I can explain the difference between primary and secondary data.

I can tell the difference between a census, a sample and a population.

I can show how data can be biased and graphs can be incorrect.

I can accurately calculate the mean, median and mode of a data set.

I can explain how outliers affect the mean.

I can solve problems that involve data and show my work.

I can communicate my thinking by justifying my answer.

I can design and conduct a survey or experiment.

I can correctly make a graph that includes: axes, title, scale and labels.



November/December Unit: Measurement (Area, Surface Area and Volume)

Learning Goals: We are learning to tell the difference between 2D and 3D shapes.  We are learning to develop and use formulas for area, surface area and volume. We are learning to solve problems involving area, surface problem, and volume.


Geometry Unit (January/February)

Learning Goals: We are learning to classify 2D and 3D shapes, and explore similar and congruent shapes. Also, we are learning to construct lines, describe the location of a point or object on a coordinate grid,  and move objects using 4 types of transformations. Lastly, we are learning to solve problems involving geometry.


March/April Unit: Integers

Learning Goals: We are learning to represent, order, and compare integers.  Also, we are learning how to add and subtract integers, with and without the use of manipulatives.  In addition, we are learning to  make connections between life and integers.  Lastly, we are learning to use integers to represent situations and solve problems.


April Unit: Fractions, Rate, Ratio, Percent, Decimals


Learning Goals: Firstly, we are learning to represent fractions as different things: parts of regions, parts of sets, parts of measures, division or ratios, and percents. Secondly, we are learning to recognize which representation -- fraction, decimal, or percent, rate, ratio -- is more useful in which situation. Thirdly, we are learning how to identify and apply proportional and nonproportional situations in the real world. Fourthly, we are learning how to select the right tools and strategies to solve problems involving proportional thinking (fractions, rate, ratio, percent).  Finally, we are learning to communicate our thinking and justify our conclusions.


May Unit: Patterning and Algebra

Learning Goals: Firstly, we are learning to describe linear patterns and relationships, using multiple representations (e.g.,  equations, table of values, graphs, models/pictures, words, numbers).  Secondly, we are learning to identify and apply algebraic situations in the real world. Thirdly, we are learning how to select the right tools and strategies to solve real-life problems using  patterning and algebra. Finally, we are learning to communicate our thinking and justify our conclusions.


June Unit: Probability

Learning Goal: Firstly, we are learning to use experimental and theoretical probability when we make decisions about our life and  future.   Secondly, we are learning to use multiple representations (e.g., charts, tables, and tree diagrams) to describe, record, and apply probabilities in the real world. Thirdly, we are learning how to select the right tools and strategies to solve real-life problems related to probability. Finally, we are learning to communicate our thinking and justify our conclusions.

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