7th Grade‎ > ‎

What Did We Do Today 7



READING LOGs have been discontinued for the time being. 

Ask your student about the 40 book challenge. 

Book Suggestions (there are many other very good books!)


Late Work Policy
  • Each day late equals 10% drop in grade. After 3 days, assignments will earn up to 70%
  • Retakes may earn a 70%.
  • Oops slips are equal to 1 day late. 1 oops slip = 1 day, 2 oops slips = 2 days
Retake policy
  • Students may retake a test or redo an assignment for a passing grade of 70%. 

Extra Credit:  Each student is given two hall passes at the beginning of each term. These may be used for the bathroom, or as an oops slip,or for 5 extra credit points each at the end of the term. No other extra credit is offered unless it is offered to the entire class. 


May 26, 2016
Last day of school
Centennial Idol
Yearbook signing
Early release
Food truck round up

May 25, 2016
7th grade day
Classic Skate
Star Wars


May 24, 2016
Final mystery activity. Today we are playing CLUE. We will apply all of our evidence and claim skills that we have learned this year. 
Teacher evaluation   tinyurl.com/teacherevals2016


May 20, 2016
Compete compare/contrast essay. 

May 19, 2016
Complete essay. After essay is done, submit it on UtahCompose. Edit until there are no errors. This essay will be graded as a constructed response. 
The grading scale is different than other essays we have done.  

May 18, 2016

YouTube Video

YouTube Video

YouTube Video


Compare/Contrast essay
Six paragraphs
  • Introduction must have clear background of the story
  • Body paragraphs will compare the play and the movie. 
  • How do the different endings make the story stronger or weaker?
  • Conclusion must show your thinking about the strength and/or weakness of each presentation.


May 17, 2016

Act 2 Scene 2

YouTube Video



YouTube Video


Detective paragraph
  • Introduction with background information
  • Theory with evidence
  • Suspects with evidence
  • Red herrings--why?
  • Conclusion
  • Write an arrest warrant (who should be arrested)

May 13, 2016
Reading Day!


May 12, 2016
Act 2: Scene 1

YouTube Video




May 11, 2016

As you read and watch, continue to keep a detective log. Who do you think the villian is? Why?
Act 1: Scene 3 The Hound of the Baskervilles

YouTube Video

YouTube Video



May 10, 2016
Speed Dating with books. 
  • Read each book for 5 minutes.
  • Write the title and author
  • Rate the book (1 is awful, 5 is awesome)
  • Pass the book and read the next book for 5 minutes.
  • Continue the process

May 6, 2016


The Hound of the Baskervilles act 1: scene 2
What clues have you found so far? 
Who do you think is the villain? 
Are there any red herrings yet? 
What motive might there be? 

May 5, 2016
Compare and contrast the play version and the following two movie versions. Create a Venn diagram with 3-5 differences and 3-5 similarities. 

YouTube Video

YouTube Video


YouTube Video

  
Watch the third one until you see the dog attacking on the moor. 

May 4, 2016

The Hounds of the Baskervilles pages 609-654 blue literature book
Act 1: Scene 1


May 3, 2016

Piñata Party!  You guys rocked the SAGE test!

"Do Schools Kill Creativity?" TED talk by Sir Ken Robinson
  • Take notes
  • In a way of your choice, show what Sir Robinson's argument was and whether you agree. 
April 28 and 29 (as weather permits)
Outside reading and writing


April 25-28, 2016
SAGE Reading Test


April 22, 2016

“There Is No Word for Goodbye” by Mary TallMountain

 

Sokoya, I said, looking through

the net of wrinkles into

wise black pools

of her eyes.

 

What do you say in Athabascan

when you leave each other?

What is the word

for goodbye?

 

A shade of feeling rippled  

the wind-tanned skin.

Ah, nothing, she said,

watching the river flash.

 

She looked at me close.

We just say, Tlaa. That means,

See you.

We never leave each other.

When does your mouth

say goodbye to your heart?

 

She touched me light

as a bluebell.

You forget when you leave us;

you're so small then.

We don't use that word.

 

We always think you're coming back, I

but if you don't,

we'll see you some place else.

You understand.

There is no word for goodbye.

 

 

Sokoya: Aunt (mother's sister)

Tlaa: See you


Graduation Morning by Pat Mora

She called him Lucero, morning star,
snared him with sweet coffee, pennies, 
Mexican milk candy, brown bony hugs.

Through the years she'd cross the Rio
Grande to clean his mother's home. "Lucero, 
mi lucero," she'd cry, when she'd see him 
running toward her in the morning, 
when she pulled stubborn cactus thorns
from his small hands, when she found him 
hiding inn the creosote. 

Though she's small and thin,
black sweater, black scarf, 
the boy in the white graduation robe 
easily finds her at the back of the cathedral, 
finds her amid the swirl of sparkling clothes, 
finds her eyes. 

Tears slide down her wrinkled cheeks. 
Her eyes, luceros, stroke her face. 


*lucero--Spanish: bright star
*mi--Spanish: my
* creosote: creosote bushes, shrubs found in Mexico and the southwestern United States.


April 21, 2016

Complete all the close reading activities. Make sure to use correct punctuation, spelling, and capitalizations. 
Answer each question thoughtfully. 
Define all vocabulary words (there are four).


April 20, 2016
Continue to work on your fractured fairy tale. 

April 18/19, 2016

YouTube Video



"The Fitting of the Slipper" by William Brooke
Write a fractured Cinderella from the perspective of a minor character. Share your story on Google.docs. 


April 15, 2016
Reading Day or Creative Writing Day

April 14, 2016


Figurative Language

Simile
Metaphor
Hyperbole
Personification
Paradox
Pun--a joke using different meaning of sounds or words for example: Handel with care (a pun on the name Handel)
Idiom
Onomatopoeia
Cliche
Alliteration
Assonance
Allusion--a hidden reference---example: The city that never sleeps (New York City)

Term

Definition

Example

Alliteration 
The repetition of usually initial consonant sounds in two or more neighboring words or syllables
The wild and woolly walrus waits and wonders when we’ll walk by
Assonance 
A resemblance of sound in words or syllables
holy & stony
and
Fleet feet sweep by sleeping geese
Cliche 
A word or phrase that has become overly familiar or commonplace
No pain, no gain
Hyperbole 
Big exaggeration, usually with humor
mile-high ice-cream cones
Idiom 
The language peculiar to a group of people
She sings at the top of her lungs
Metaphor 
Comparing two things by using one kind of object or using in place of another to suggest the likeness between them
Her hair was silk
Onomatopoeia
Naming a thing or an action by imitating the sound associated with it
buzz, hiss, roar, woof
Personification
Giving something human qualities
The stuffed bear smiled as the little boy hugged him close
Simile 
A figure of speech comparing two unlike things that is often introduced by like or as
The sun is like a yellow ball of fire in the sky


April 13, 2016
The Chief's Daughter by Rosemary Sutcliff  pages 261-270 blue anthology

I can identify figurative language in a short story.

  • Similie: A simile is a comparison that uses the word like or as. For example, Sutcliff uses the simile "like a withered leaf" to suggest  Laethrig's age and brittleness. What does Sutcliff suggest by stating that looking into Laethrig's eyes "was like looking through the doorway of an empty hut"?  

April 11/12, 2016

The Birth of Battlefield photography

YouTube Video



YouTube Video


Assignment: You are a newspaper journalist. Write a news report explaining what happened at this battle. Be as factual as you can be. 



April 1, 2016
1000 question essay test. Be ready. 
Bring a book to read when you are done. 


March 31, 2016

Assignment--answer in complete sentences with complete thoughts. 

Bring on the tough stuff - there is not just one right answer.

1.  What do you think ultimately made Rachel so upset about the sweater mix-up? Was she just being dramatic? Was it that the other students believed the sweater belonged to her or that no one believed her when she denied it? Was it how Mrs. Price handled the situation? All of the above?
2.  What's Mrs. Price's deal anyway? Why do you think she handles the situation the way she does?
3.  Phyllis Lopez finally remembers the sweater is hers at the end. Why do you reckon it took her so long to remember this? Do you suppose she tried to get away from admitting she owned the sweater? Was it an honest mistake?
4.  At one point, Rachel notes, "And maybe one day when you're all grown up maybe you will need to cry like if you're three, and that's okay. That's what I tell Mama when she's sad and needs to cry" (2). Why do you suppose this detail was added to the story?


March 30, 2016
Key Vocabulary
  1. Beckon
  2. Drawl
  3. Liberation
  4. Scheme
Conflict:
Why doesn't the painter lady speak to the children or tell them what she is doing?
This story is told in first person, how would it change if it were told by the painter lady?

Me and Lou were cracking up in the kitchen, and several customers at the counter were clearing their throats waiting for Mama to really fix her 
wagon for not speaking to the elders when she came in. The painter lady took a stool at the counter and went right on with her questions. Was 
there cheese in the baked macaroni, she wanted to know? Were there eggs in the salad? Was it honey or sugar in the iced tea? Mama was fixing 
Pop Johnson’s plate. And every time the painter lady asked a fool question, Mama would dump another spoonful of rice on the pile. She was 
tapping her foot and heating up in a dangerous way. But Pop Johnson was happy as he could be. Me and Lou peeked through the service window, 
wondering what planet the painter lady came from. Who ever heard of baked macaroni without cheese, or potato salad without eggs.

What are the two conflict in this paragraph? Are they internal conflicts or external conflicts?

Assignment"
Write a speech that the painter lady might deliver to the community if she were to return for the dedication of the mural. 


March 28/29, 2016
"Waiting" by Budge Wilson pages 39-49 in blue anthology.
Key Vocabulary
  1. apathy
  2. arresting
  3. dominant
  4. flamboyant
  5. infuriatingly
  6. quarantine
  7. saunter
  8. stupefying
  9. submissive
  10. vigor

  • After reading the story, analyze the following section:

As I continued to bow and smile, the word came to me to describe that strange new thing. Power. Henrietta had power. And what's more, she had it without having to do a single thing. All she needs to do, I thought, is be. The terrible injustice of it all stabbed me. There I was, the lead role, the director, the brains and vigor of our twinship, and suddenly, after all my years in first place, it was she who had all the power. 

  • How did the relationship change? 
  • Why did it change? 
  • If you were to tell the story from Henrietta's perspective, how would it be different?

March 25, 2016
Game day

March 21-March 24
SAGE writing test

March 18, 2016
Reading Day---Last day of 3rd term.
Nearpod.com  SFCOU  Vocabulary Lessons 22-27 Final

March 17, 2015
Review explanatory essays. 

YouTube Video



After viewing the video, discuss the following:

  • What was interesting?

  • What did you learn?

  • What was confusing?


  • Evaluate how the article on baseballs built background.

  • Was the hook interesting?

  • Notice that in longer articles, the background information is longer than one paragraph.


  • In small groups, list as many facts you can about the making of a baseball (large post-its).

  • Each student will write an introductory paragraph. These should include:

    • Hook

    • Background information

    • Thesis statement

If time allows

  • After creating an introduction, students will write a quick and dirty outline. This outline should take no longer than 5 minutes to write.

  • Students will be reminded that on the SAGE, they will have 60-90 minutes to write their essay. They must pace themselves carefully. Time callouts will be given.


Homework:

  • Practice for tomorrow's vocabulary quiz. Students may practice on Quizlet. Test will be given on Nearpod.com.



March 16, 2016
Continue working on essay. 
Please submit completed essay on Utahcompose.com

March 14/15, 2016
Read each article. Show evidence of close reading of the articles by annotating thoughtfully. 
Write an essay arguing who would win: Batman or Superman? Your essay must be based on ideas, concepts, and information from the three following articles. 
  • Plan your essay
  • Write your essay; and 
  • Revise and edit your essay.
Be sure to
  • include a claim
  • address counterclaims
  • use evidence from multiple sources
  • Do not over rely on one source. 
Article #1
Despite being best buds, they sure do fight a lot. And most of the time, Batman wins. 

Why? Because Superman is usually under mind-control or being manipulated somehow and Batman
is called upon to neutralize big blue. Even Superman realizes his power could be disastrous if misused 
and so the only being in the galaxy he entrusts with Kryptonite is Batman. 

To be fair, the above scenario plays out most of the time because Batman is usually prepared. 
He has standard operating procedures dedicated to taking Superman (and every other hero) down
if the need arises (I'm not kidding--this paranoia and obsessive planning was actually the source
of an interesting storyline). 

However, if Batman does not have the warning needed to bust out the aforementioned anti-Kryptonian
gear, then yes, Superman would crush the human. 

But to be fair, let's look at both sides. 



March 11, 2016
Reading DAY! 

March 10, 2016
Review of testing tools on SAGEportal.  If you would like to look at these again, login as a guest on SAGEportal.org.  

March 9, 2016 
Read "H-ey, Come on O---ut". Show examples of close reading. What does the ending mean? Write a paragraph showing your thinking and analysis of 
the meaning of the ending. 

March 7, 2016. 

Junius Maltby by John Steinbeck

Junius comes from San Francisco to the Pastures. He marries the widow with whom he boards and lives with her and her two sons. She bears his child, but soon
after she and her two sons die of influenza. Junius raises his son, Robbie, to read great books and spend his days philosophizing, but eventually the community 
demands that Robbie go to school. Here his lack of good clothes and shoes bring such shame to the family that both he and his father lose their sense of 
self-identity. Having been swayed to the community’s opinion that Junius has not been taking proper care of Robbie in their idyllically lazy, but intellectually curious 
and alive lifestyle, the Maltbys slink away, back to San Francisco.

Analysis question: How does where you live influence how you are? For example, if your neighborhood looks and feels a certain way to you, does that make you feel 
certain things about yourself?

As you read the story, find three quotes that you feel were key to the story. Explain why you chose each quote. 


March 4, 2016
Vocabulary Test on the roots -chrono- and -tempor--  Nearpod.com  code:  AHSYV 
Reading Day

March 3, 2016
Career Day

March 2, 2016--share this letter with lisaharr@stu.provo.edu
Finish writing a letter to the editor. This assignment will wrap up our Civil Rights unit. 
Letter format:
Date
Salutation
1st body paragraph gives background information
2nd body paragraph gives examples
3rd body paragraph has a call to action
Closing (Sincerely, Thank you,)
Your name. 

Student example:

2/29/1960

Dear Editor:

Schools should not be separated any longer. The children are not getting equal education. They are not getting equal things on anything for that matter. The bathrooms, seats on buses (or other vehicles), and schools to name a few. Our country is supposed to be all about equality, but this is not equality, this is giving the blacks the run down things that no whites want to use anymore. All the children go to school to get an education, whatever color their skin may be, but the blacks aren’t getting that. It has been many, many years since the civil war, but still we do not see the blacks as humans. Our equals.

`Many of the black schools are given the teachers that are less qualified than those at the white’s schools’. That is not fair. The blacks deserve just as good of an education as the whites do. Only a few got that though. Of those few, Ruby Bridges was certainly one of the most famous. She passed a test that only five other African-Americans had passed, and earned the right to help start the process of integration. The fact that she had to be escorted by four marshals to the doors of the school to keep back the mobs of white protesters from attacking the small girl is rather insane. They wanted to hurt a little girl, just because they were afraid of change and didn’t want a black girl in their school with their children. Since they couldn’t stop her from going into the school, they took their children out of the school for a whole year. For a whole year Ruby had to study and learn all alone.

This needs to stop. It’s ridiculous. Ruby and the five other African-Americans have started the process of integration, and we should continue it. We should not care about what color someone’s skin is, they are humans too. We should not be afraid of change, we should embrace it. There always comes a time for change, and now is that time. Schools should come together, the blacks and the whites. They should be able to receive the same education. It is only fair.



Thank you for your time

Sincerely,

Student's name

March 1, 2016

Learning Target: Today I will use three different texts on a single topic to create meaning. I will read a picture, listen to a story, and view a video clip as a way to understand one event. I will build understanding through discussion. I will show mastery by writing a letter to a newspaper editor about race, racial tensions, and racial tolerance.

The Story of Ruby Bridges by Robert Coles, Illustrated by George Ford

A Brief Summary of Ruby’s Life

When the United States federal government in 1960 ordered the desegregation of New Orleans public schools, a young African American student named Ruby Bridges and her family were thrust into the national spotlight. Ruby was born in Tylertown, Mississippi in 1954. In 1957, economic conditions forced her family to move to New Orleans where her father worked as a custodian and her mother cleaned floors at a bank. The entire family was actively involved in the church and their neighborhood community. When integration was ordered, the NAACP backed Ruby’s assignment to a first grade class at William Frantz Elementary School. The president was forced to call up Federal Marshals to maintain order and insure safety. Ruby was soon the only student attending Frantz, as hostile white parents withdrew their children and protested at the school each day. Despite the continuous harassment that Ruby and her parents faced, she continued to attend Frantz Elementary from which she graduated and moved on to high school. Though Ruby never went to college, she is now quite successful. Now Ruby Bridges Hall, she has raised four children, lectures around the country, wrote a book of her own, Through My Eyes, and heads the Ruby Bridges Foundation, which consults with schools to develop diversity programs and increase parental involvement.


Themes

  • The importance of education

  • Racial equality and tolerance

  • Overcoming hatred

  • Civil Rights


Introductory Activity

  • Norman Rockwell’s painting “The Problem We All Live With”

    • Discuss what this picture shows, says, causes you to feel.

      • Notice the racial slur, the KKK, and also notice that the emphasis of the picture is on the little girl, not the adult men.



Selected Passages to Be Used in Discussion

  • At that time, black children and white children went to separate schools in New Orleans.

  • The white people in the neighborhood would not send their children to school.

  • Every day, Ruby went into the classroom with a big smile on her face, ready to get down to the business of learning.

  • So Ruby began learning how to read and write in an empty classroom, an empty building.

  • Every day Ruby would stop and pray.

  • Afterword: We’ve been sitting back and letting our children get cheated out of an education because some people have tried to take the law into their own hands.


Discussion Questions

  • Why was it so important to Ruby’s parents to send her to William Frantz Elementary School?

  • Could she have gotten as good of an education at another school?

  • Comparing the painting and the story, how would you have felt as a parent to send your child into this mob? What lesson were the Bridges teaching Ruby? What were they teaching the world? How did this experience change the face of the United States?

  • Comparing this story and the lessons we have learned from Frederick Douglass, why is education so important? What did each (Douglass and Ruby Bridges) do because they valued education?

  • Why wouldn’t the city or state police protect Ruby? Why did the President need to bring in the national guard?

  • How did Ruby’s continued attendance begin to break down racial barriers?

  • What can we do at Centennial to break down racial and social barriers?


Follow-up activity

Writing Assignment: Small Groups

  • Write a letter to the editor of our local newspaper

    • Discuss race, racial tensions, racial tolerance.

    • Use personal antidotes to strengthen your letter

    • Be aware of audience (this should be a semi-formal letter, but it may be written in first person).


February 26, 2016
Vocabulary Test on Nearpod.com   MHCPD
Pretest for Lesson 27 TUPVI
After test, we will have a reading day!


February 25, 2016    
Watsons Go to Birmingham chapter 15
Share your reflection with another person. Allow them to read it and comment in writing. 

February 24, 2016
Watsons Go to Birmingham chapter 14

Did I find similarities between the book and the historical event?

Did I find differences between the book and the historical event?


Write a reflection piece addressing your feelings about the bombing. Shoot for a full page.


February 23, 2016
Watsons Go to Birmingham  chapters 10-13
Create a Venn Diagram comparing Kenny and Byron. 
  • List 5 similarities
  • List 5 differences
  • How is Byron changing?
  • How is Kenny changing?


February 19, 2016
Vocabulary Quiz for lesson 25   Nearpod.com  ZYVEW 


Reading Day Options:
  1. If you did not complete "Doris is Coming" last Friday, you need to complete that close reading. 
  2. If you have an A or B, and you finished "Doris is Coming," you may read.
  3. If you don't have a passing grade, you must make up at least one assignment. 

February 18, 2016
Read chapter 10 in Watsons Go to Birmingham--1963

Painting with word structure

Sentence Structure: We might look at this picture and say, "The boy plays."
  1. Write one simple sentence about this picture. Have a subject and a verb only. 
  2. Next, add a pronoun, name the boy. Example, "Sean plays." 
  3. Next add a participle, "Sean has been playing."
  4. Next, add a appositive, a phrase that relates to Sean and is place near Sean in the sentence. Example, My grandson, Sean, has been playing."
  5. Now we will add an adjective*.  Example: "My excited grandson, Sean,( has been playing." Excited describes Sean, the pronoun, not playing, which is the verb.
  6. Next we will add an adverb**, My excited grandson Sean has been playing in the yard joyfully." Or it might say, "My excited grandson Sean has been joyfully playing." Joyfully describes the verb playing. While Sean is joyful, the word joyfully changes the meaning of the verb.

*In grammar, an adjective is a 'describing' word; the main syntactic role of which, is to qualify a noun or noun phrase, giving more information about the object signified.

**An adverb is a word that changes or qualifies the meaning of a verbadjective, other adverb, clausesentence or any other word or phrase, except that it does not include the adjectives and determiners that directly modify nouns


Here is another picture.  In six steps, move from a simple to a complex sentence. 

TODAY

Only write a sentence with a noun, verb, and three participles at the beginning of the sentence. 

Example: The bubbling, frothing, expanding milk added excitement to Sean's lunch.


February 17, 2016
Read chapter 9 in Watsons Go to Birmingham--1963

Compare this TED talk with what we have learned about segregation during the early 1960s. How does this fit with Momma's planning for the trip to Birmingham?


February 16, 2016
Read chapter 8 in Watsons Go to Birmingham--1963
  • Imagine the point of view of Kenny, Byron, Joetta, Momma, and Daddy. Now think about Kenny and his choice of the record "Yakkety Yak." 
  • How do you think Byron would feel if he were on a road trip and Kenny played this record over and over and over again. What would you do?
  • Now imagine you are Momma, or Daddy, or even Joetta. What would each of these do? This is called Point of View. 
Assignment: Create your own play list of ten songs that you would bring on a long road trip. 

February 12, 2016 
Vocabulary list 24 root word -flect- and -flu- test.  Quizlet practice   Nearpod code:  FBVHT
If you did not pre-test out of this list, the blue packet is due today.

Pre-test for lesson 25. Quizlet practice
Short story "Doris Is Coming" close read. 
If you complete these assignments, independent reading. 


February 11, 2016
Chapter 7
  • What do you think the author is trying to tell us about family relationships? What's his point?
Today is our last day using reciprocal reading. 
Choose a new role. Discuss with your group what you learned about the chapter. 

February 10, 2016
Chapter 6 
  • Who is the narrator?
  • Is he a credible narrator? Do we believe everything he tells us?
  • How would the story be different if it was told from Byron's perspective? How about Joey's or Momma's? 
  • What do we know about Kenny that makes him credible and/or unreliable?
  • Is he the protagonist or an antagonist? If you were to ask Byron, what would he say?
Choose a reciprocal reading role you have not chosen yet. See February 3. 
Answer all of the questions for your assigned role. 

February 9, 2016
A hyperbole is an exaggeration which is not to be taken literally. After reading Chapter 4 and 5 in Watsons Go To Birmingham, write a tall 
tale using at least 2 hyperboles. Spend about 20 minutes writing. 

February 5, 2016
Vocabulary Quiz on Nearpod.com  Code:  OSANG
Pink vocabulary packet is due today. 
Reading Day when quiz is finished. 

February 4, 2016
Reciprocal Reading: chapter 3

Chapter 2 Watsons Go To Birmingham ---1963
Reciprocal Reading: This strategy has each student fulfill group roles as they read a chapter independently.

Roles:

Predict:  While reading, answer the following questions...
I think...
I'll bet...
I wonder if...
I imagine...
I suppose...
I think I will learn... because...
I think...will happen because...

Summarize:
The most important ideas are...
This part was mostly about...
This chapter was about...
This story takes place...
The main characters are...
A problem occurs when...
In the beginning [middle, end] ...

Question:
I wonder...?
Who...?
What...?
Where...?
Why...?
How...?
What if...?
Why do you think...?
How do you think...?

Clarify:
I didn't get the [word, idea, part] so I [reread, read on, sounded it out, etc].
I didn't understand the part where...
This is a tricky word because...
To clarify, I can...
  • Reread
  • Read on
  • Sound out
  • Look for parts I know
  • Blend the sounds together
  • Think of another word
  • Make a picture in my head

February 2, 2016
Do you think your family is weird? Do you have that sibling, you know the one I am talking about. The sibling who is the bane of his/her mother's 
existence. The family's juvenile delinquent. In our new book, we are going to meet Byron, Kenny, and Joetta Watson. Christopher Paul Curtis wrote 
the delightful book, Watsons Go To Birmingham--1963 about the Watsons. The story is told by Kenny, the 10 year old middle child. Come join us
on this reading adventure. 

Please read chapter 1. As we read this chapter, we will be looking at the theme of the story. What other books have similar themes? How does
Christopher Paul Curtis use a chapter as a hook?  

Review vocabulary list 23  --gram and --graph.


January 29, 2016
Vocabulary Quiz on -philia and -phobia.  This test is on Nearpod.com. Code BEPXC.  You make take this at home if you are absent. 
Reading Day

You will receive lesson 23 list for -graph and -gram. This packet is due on February 5 just before the vocabulary test. 
  1. calligraphy
  2. cartography
  3. demography
  4. epigram
  5. graphic
  6. holography
  7. monogram
  8. monograph
  9. seismograph
  10. typography  

January 28, 2016

Paper pass around

  • Each student will read their classmates papers, add thoughtful comments, and note two facts learned from those papers. If your paper is not ready, you will not get points for sharing your paper. 


January 27, 2016
Continue to research and write Civil Rights paper. Remember, you must have one typed page on your topic. This is due at the beginning of class on Thursday. 

January 25/26, 2016
Vocabulary list
  1. acrophobia
  2. agoraphobia
  3. ailurophobia
  4. Anglophile
  5. audiophile
  6. bibliophile
  7. claustrophobia
  8. hydrophobia
  9. xenophobia
  10. zoophobia
New literature unit: Watsons Go to Birmingham-1963 by Christopher Paul Curtis

Mini research unit due on Thursday, January 28, 2016
You will have an assigned topic, one that relates to the Civil Rights Movement. 
If you are absent, please research one of the following:
  • Brown vs. Board of Education
  • Little Rock 9
  • Freedom Riders
  • 16 Street Baptist Church Bombing
  • Montgomery Bus Boycott
  • Plessy vs. Ferguson
  • Boycotts
  • Sit-ins
  • Non-violent protests
  • Mahatma Ghandhi
Answer the following questions:
  1. What is your topic?
  2. Where did this person live, or where did this event take place?
  3. What is this person, or event best known for?
  4. Why is this important to the Civil Rights Movement?
  5. What important changes took place after the person or event occurred?
  6. Why is it important to know about this person, place, or event?
What three sources did you read?  Only one may be Wikipedia. 

Write a one page (really, only one) report on your topic. 
  • Have an introductory paragraph
  • Two body paragraphs
  • One concluding paragraph. 

January 19-21, 2016
Beginning of 3rd term--new seating charts. 
  • Interim SAGE testing (Reading, listening, grammar)

January 15, 2016
Reading Day.  End of 2nd term. 

January 14, 2016
Revise "What is an explorer" essay on UtahCompose. Remember, there was an update on UtahCompose and nobody is getting a score above 24. Hang in there!

January 13, 2016

Continue to work on annotations and writing an argumentative essay

January 12, 2016

 

Write an argumentative essay using a claim on one side of the argument. Please include the following:
  • Introduction with a clear claim
  • Body paragraph
  • Body paragraph
  • Body paragraph
  • Counter-claim paragraph
  • Conclusion
When you are done, this will be put onto UtahCompose.

Assignment is due on January 19th. This is a Tuesday (we do not have school on Monday this week). This assignment is due in 
all 7th grade English classes. Do not think just because you are changing teachers at the term, you will be excused from this assignment, 
you will not!

January 8, 2016
Reading Day with individual interviews

January 7, 2016
Continue working on Rikki-Tikki-Tavi


January 6, 2016
"Rikki-tikki-tavi" by Rudyard Kipling
The Colonization of India page 399 blue literature book.
Take a stand: Who does Rikki-tikki-tavi represent? Make sure to use textual evidence to support your response. 

January 5, 2016
"Big Things Come in Small Packages" by Eleanora E. Tate

December 18, 2015
Parts of speech: verbs (both present and past tense), nouns (both singular and plural), adjectives, and onomatopoeia.
Twas the Night Before Christmas mad lib.  

December 17, 2015
What is an explorer/survivor paper due today. We will be putting these onto UtahCompose today. 
Domino effect graphic organizer.  When one thing happens, there is sometimes a domino effect. Find the sequence of domino effects in this story. 

December 16, 2015
Cause and Effect graphic organizer  Identify the cause and effects found in the story. 

December 15, 2015

December 11, 2015
Reading Day
Shipwreck 10 point and 20 point assignments are due today. 


December 10, 2015

30 point assignment is 2 pages long, 12 point font (Times New Roman or Cambria).  Due December 17

  • Using at least three sources, describe what it means to be an explorer. Think outside the box. You may describe historic explorers or current explorers. Do not limit yourself to geographical exploration.

  • Change In Assignment

    • You may write about survivors. See examples of survivors on class website.




December 2-4, 7-9, 2015
We are going to finish reading Shipwreck at the Bottom of the World. 
Make sure you write a 17 word summary about the Cairn's trip from Elephant Island to South Georgia Island. One sentence, 17 words! No more, no less. 

November 30 / December 1, 2015
Remember to define 9 words, find one more word that you don't know and define that word (if you know all of the words, find one you think another student
won't know and define that word)
Find the author's claim for each article. Find three evidences for each claim. 
Write an outline for an argumentative essay. 
Write an introductory paragraph. Make sure to include a hook. 

Shipwreck at the Bottom of the World Chapter "Patience, Patience, Patience"

November 24, 2015
Shipwreck at the Bottom of the World Chapters "Ocean Camp" and "Mutiny"
How did events create other events?  
Why did McNeish refuse to work?

November 20, 2015
Reading Day!  If you are behind on assignments, you will be invited to complete those assignments before you begin to read. 

November 19, 2015
How did the crew of the Endurance handle moving to the ice flow? How do events affect individuals? 
We are reading pages 49-54 in Shipwreck at the Bottom of the World. 

Change the due date on the 10 point assignment to December 11.
You must choose one 10 point assignment, one 20 point assignment, and complete the 30 point assignment. 


November 18, 2015
Many times we read and there are signal words to tell us what kind of text we are reading. In Shipwreck, we are reading about the crushing force of the ice flows. Because of this, Captain Shackleton has to abandon the ship. This is an example of a problem/solution structure. Some signal words for this structure are:
  • One reason for...
  • A solution...
  • A problem...
  • The question is...
  • One answer is...
  • Recommendations include...

November 17, 2015
BWA Global Warming  due November 20, 2015
Please complete the outline on ProvoBuzz. 

November 13, 2015
Reading day
Context clues: How do you make meaning using context clues?

November 12, 2015
Individuals vs events
How did Blackborrow's choices affect the entire trip? Predict
"The Growler"  

November 11, 2015

RI.5 Compare/Contrast

RI.3 Individual vs. Individual


"The Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition" pages 2-9
Begin a reading journal 
How did individuals and their interactions with each other and nature play a part in this chapter?




November 10, 2015
Compare/Contrast fiction vs. nonfiction (yellow worksheet)
KWL about Antarctica (what do I know, what do I want to know, what did I learn)
25 facts about Antarctica 

YouTube Video


"Imagine" page 1 Shipwreck at the Bottom of the World

November 6, 2015
Reading Day
Infer/Predict Write down three predictions that you made as you read today. 
What clues (foreshadowing) in your reading caused you to make these predictions? (Quote from the text.)

November 5, 2015
Job Shadow day. No school for 7th graders. Make sure to complete your Job Shadow paper and 
return it by Monday. 

November 4, 2015
Today we will be discussing two texts. First, Robert Frost's poem "A Time to Talk" andTEDTalk "Connected, but Alone" (first 4 minutes). Look for each author's claim. Be prepared to discuss the concept of connected alone

November 3, 2015

Today you will be putting your argumentative essay onto UtahCompose. Each of you will have individual growth plans. If you don't know what my goal for you is, come talk to me. After today, if you have not met your growth plan, you will be invited to to PLUS time for additional help. . After today, if you have not met your growth plan, you will be invited to to PLUS time for additional help. If you have finished your
essay, please read the short story, "The War of the Wall" on pages 84-91 in the blue literature books. 
Then, on a separate sheet of paper,  have them complete questions 1-6 and then quickwrite #3 on page 92.

October 19-30
We will be working on a full argumentative essay for the next two weeks. Most of the work will be done in class. Vocabulary needs to be done outside of class. 

October 14, 2015
Reading Log due
Reading Day
  • Text to self connections
  • Text to text connections
  • Text to world connections
Nearpod.com  Session ID VWSRO

October 13, 2015

Reteaching Author's Claim and Body Paragraphs in BWA#3--see October 5/6. 
Boy chapters "Homesickness" and "A Drive in a Motorcar"


October 9, 2015
Provo Library teen librarians will be visiting us today. 
Reading Strategy for reading time:  Synthesize What’s the theme or author’s message? Synthesize the
message in what you read today.  
Create a word web that will illustrate the theme for today's reading. 




October 8, 2015
RL 7.9 Compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same
period as a means of understanding how authors of fiction use or alter history. 

Shirley Temple in "The Little Princess"
Compare to Boy chapters "The Matron" and "Homesickness. 

How is the boarding school portrayed in the beginning part of the movie. How does that compare to the version in the book. Using a Venn Diagram, list similarities and differences. 



October 7, 2015
RL 7.6  Analyze how an author develops and contrast the points of view of different character or narrators in a text. 
        Boy by Roald Dahl
            Pages 75-85
                The First Day
                The Matron
  • As your read, take notes from each character's point of view. 
    • Roald
    • Mama
    • The Headmaster
  • How does each character view the world in a different way?
  • What evidence can you show that supports your analysis?


October 5/6, 2015
Please define the ten words. Write ten annotations. Find the author's claim. Write an eight sentence body paragraph. 
Due date is October 9 (Friday). 

Today we are beginning the 36 book challenge. Each student is encouraged to set a goal to read 36 books before the end 
of the school year. They are to read a variety of genres. We will begin keeping a reading journal, with books we are reading and others we 
want to read. This works out to one book a week. If you are reading a book that is long, say 350 pages, count that as two books. 
It will be fun to share what books we are reading with each other. So with that introduction, grab a book, find a comfy spot, and begin reading!


October 2, 2015
RL 7.1  Reading: Literature Standard 1  Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as 
well as inferences drawn from the text.

Today is our reading day. If you have finished your story from yesterday you may begin reading. If you still need to work on the story, please do that before you pull out your book. If you missed class, the nearpod.com session code is MKXGF. Please read for 30-40 minutes. 

October 1, 2015
Using your plot structure about your own unpleasant experience, write a short story. Please share it with me on Google.doc at my lisaharr@stu.provo.edu email. 

September 30, 2015
RL 7.3 Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact (e.g., how setting shapes the characters or plot)
Chapter 9
  • A visit to the doctor
    • How did the setting of this chapter create a vivid picture, one that was believable for you?
    • What was the conflict in this chapter?
      • Roald had enlarged tonsils
    • List three rising actions
      • Going to the doctor
      • Mama and the doctor talking quietly
      • Doctor preparing tools
    • Climax 
      • the doctor pulled the tonsils---searing white pain
    • Falling Action
      • Why did Mama and Roald have to walk to and from the doctor?
    • Resolution
      • Getting home and having Bestemama say he had had a hard day
    • How have times changed? 
  • Writing prompt--
      • Think of an unpleasant experience in your own life. 
      • Include background information--paint a picture with words so that the reader feels that they are actually there. 
      • Using a plot structure model, outline the following. 
        • Introduction with detailed setting
          • Characters involved (don't just say my mother, or my sister)
        • Conflict
        • Several rising actions
        • Climax
        • Falling action
        • Resolution
Reading Plus pre-assessment

September 25, 2015

Reading Day

RL7.1  Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

Reading Strategy:  Questioning/Clarifying Write down five Clarifying questions (without a known answer in the text) that came to you as you read this week. Use higher level thinking skills to develop these.

Insights

Some ideas come from insight — a spontaneous cohesion (putting things together to make meaning) of several thoughts. An insight is like a light bulb turning on in a person's head. Insights are great thoughts that help a person to see or understand something, quite often something that he has not been able to figure out before. For example, a student may be having trouble getting all of his homework done every night. Usually this student leaves his math homework until last because he doesn't like math and math is hard for him. Suddenly, he considers that if he does his hardest subject first, the rest of the homework won't seem so bad, and he might actually finish it all. This student just had an insightful idea about how to solve his homework problem.


September 24, 2015

"The Magic Island" pages 60-67
  • RL 7.4  Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes and other repetitions of sounds (e.g., alliteration) on a specific verse or stanza of a poem or section of a story or drama
    • We shall all be food for the fishes before the day is out!" page 60
    • It is the greatest place on earth. Page 61
    • All ten of us would pile into the boat. Page 63
    • click-click, click-click  Onomatopoeia (is a word that phonetically imitates, resembles or suggests the source of the sound that it describes) 
    • The fairly ancient half-brother was the only one who could make the engine go at all. It was extremely difficult to start, and he always had to unscrew the sparking-plug and pour petro into the cylinder. Then he swung a flywheel round and round, and with a bit of luck, after a lot of coughing and spluttering, the thing would finally get going. Page 65 (from textual clues, rewrite what this paragraph actually is saying in American English). In class, this will be done with a partner. Students will rewrite this paragraph together (interpersonal skills).
    • Driving through mountainous white-capped waves and getting drenched to the skin, while mother calmly handled the tiller. 
September 23, 2015
"Going to Norway"
Newcastle UK to Oslo, Norway

Norwegian Fjord

After reading this chapter, discuss with a classmate a tradition your family celebrates. 




September 22, 2015
Read "Mrs. Pratchett's Revenge"
Reread "The Great Mouse Plot"
Imagine you are Mrs. Pratchett. Retell the story from her perspective. Make sure you tell the whole story from Mrs. Pratchett's voice. 

September 18, 2015
BWA #2 Vocabulary test
Reading day

September 17, 2015
"The Great Mouse Plot", 
Point of View  Roald vs. Mrs. Pratchett
In small groups, make up what will happen after this prank. 


September 16, 2015
Boy "The bicycle and the sweet shop"

September 15, 2015

Museums and Selfies article  please write one body paragraph

8 sentences

  1. Topic sentence
  2. Concrete detail
  3. Analysis or commentary
  4. Additional analysis or commentary
  5. Concrete detail
  6. Analysis or commentary
  7. Additional analysis or commentary
  8. Conclusion
Avoid using first, second, or third as transition words. 

Quizlet




September 11, 2015
Reading Day--Reading Logs are due today. 

September 10, 2015


Point of view
autobiography
memoir
biography

Chapter 1 Boy


September 9, 2015
  • For the starter, students will write a one paragraph story from their childhood. It can be any story that they remember.

  • Why are stories told from a personal perspective so powerful? 
  • Why is it important to read/watch them? 
  • Why is it important to tell/listen to them?


CHOOSE SIX QUESTIONS FOR YOU CUBE. YOU MUST WRITE AT LEAST TWO SENTENCES PER CUBE QUESTION.

  1. When and where were you born?
  2. Do you recall any interesting stories regarding your birth?
  3. What is your earliest memory?
  4. What is one of your favorite stories from your childhood?
  5. What is your greatest hope?
  6. What is your greatest fear?
  7. Who is your biggest fan?
  8. What is your happiest memory?
  9. What accomplishment are you most proud of?
  10. What is the funniest thing that’s ever happened to you?
  11. What is your most memorable travel experience?
  12. What would be your ideal job?
  13. Did you have any nicknames?
  14. What is your family like?
  15. What do you want to be when you grow up?
  16. What do you do when you aren’t in school?
  17. Do you have any pets?
  18. What do you want to be when you grow up?
  19. Do you like your name? Why or why not?
  20. What is your most embarrassing moment?
In small groups, share your cube. You will take turns rolling the cube and telling about yourself.



September 8, 2015

UtahCompose day!  Yippee!  

Log in to UtahCompose.com  using your state number. 

If your login and password are the same, you will be asked to change you password. Please change it to your lunch number. After this, you may need to log out and then log in again. 

Next, choose your class period. 

Then look at the top of the page and find practice, click on that. 

A prompt titled "Cecil the Lion BWA Argumentative Essay" will appear. Click on begin writing. 

Now you are going to open a new tab and go to Google.doc.

Find your Big Cats essay. Highlight all of your writing, click CTL C. 

Go back to UtahCompose, in the text box that is open, click CTL V. Your essay should paste into the text box.

Now submit. This will give you a score for your first draft of your essay. 

Now you may click on REVISE and begin editing and revising. 

You have 1 hour to work on UtahCompose for this assignment. Good luck.




September 4, 2015

Vocabulary quiz on Big Cats vocabulary--study on Quizlet

Reading logs are due

"Famous lion's killing has the world angry about big-cat hunts" article is due with definitions, author's claim, and at least 10 annotations. 

Independent reading when you are done with the vocabulary quiz



September 3, 2015

Continue working on Big Cats essay. 


September 2, 2015

Today we wrote a multi-paragraph essay using the Newsela article as our starting point. 

Each essay should have 6 paragraphs

  • Introduction with a claim
  • Three body paragraphs with concrete details and commentary
  • One paragraph stating and explaining a counter claim
  • Conclusion
Please use Google.docs to type your essay. 
Label the essay  "Big Cats, your last name, class period"  
Share with editing rights to lisaharr@stu.provo.edu


September 1, 2015

Cecil the Lion video


Newsela article "Famous lion's killing has the world angry about big-cat hunts"

 Vocabulary Quizlet

  • extinction
  • conservation
  • distinctive
  • criticized
  • documentary
  • conforms
  • inflated
  • isolated
  • critically
  • declines
  • romanticizes

Reflection Questions:

  1. How do hunting and conservation interact? Is hunting good/bad? Should conservation override sport?

  2. Should the American be treated as a criminal?

  3. Why has this event angered so many people in the world community?


August 28, 2015

Reading Logs are due today. 

Please come to class prepared to read a book of your choice. 


August 27, 2015

Writing prompt:  I have never been more frightened than when:

"Thank You, Ma'am" by Langston Hughes

  • Please identify at least three rising actions found in this story. Be prepared to discuss your findings with the class.


August 26, 2015

Today students will spend about 15 minutes finishing an essay called "Hard Things." This essay is a pre-assessment, allowing me to see your students writing level at the beginning of the year. 


I See You Never by Ray Bradbury--introduction to fiction

Plot structure organizer

  • Exposition
  • Rising Action
  • Climax
  • Falling Action
  • Resolution


August 25, 2015

212 Degrees--The Extra Degree Motivational video


We Choose To Go To The Moon---JFK


Ben Saunders: To the South Pole and back — the hardest 105 days of my life


Eleanor Roosevelt once said, "You must do the thing you think you cannot do." Write a narrative about a time when you did something you thought you could not do. Do not despair that you have not been to the South Pole. Each of you have done hard things.  Be sure to include specific details so that a reader can follow your story.


Please write at least 5 paragraphs. Each paragraph should have a minimum of 5 sentences, preferably more.

Please share essays with lisaharr@stu.provo.edu


August 21, 2015
Friday reading day.  Today we had a speed dating experience with books. Each book was given five minutes to suck us in before the readers moved to a new book. This allowed us to explore a large number of books in a short period of time. 

Ask your students about reading logs tonight. Remember, each student is expected to read 100 minutes a night outside of school. While the Internet, newspapers, magazines, comic books, and family scripture reading is great, these types of texts are not acceptable for reading logs. We are looking for grade appropriate literature and memoirs. If your student has a question, please have them come and check with me. Don't forget, parent or guardian signatures are required for full credit. Reading logs are due on each Friday of the week. If we don't have a Friday, they are due on the following first day of the next week.

August 20, 2015
Library orientation

August 19, 2015

Disclosure Document Please read this document with your student and have them return the completed signature page by Friday, August 21, 2015. 




























4th Term
Late Work Policy
  • Each day late equals 10% drop in grade. After 3 days, assignments will earn up to 70%
  • Retakes may earn a 70%.
  • Oops slips are equal to 1 day late. 1 oops slip = 1 day, 2 oops slips = 2 days
  • Reading Logs may be turned in within the first week after the due date. After that they will not be accepted. 

May 27, 2015
Yearbook Day


May 26, 2015
Article of the Week vocabulary test. 
Letter to next year's students


May 22, 2015
Awards ceremony at TVHS
Reading Day

May 21, 2015
Classic Skate/7th Grade Day

May 20, 2015
Using your "Little Truths" template, write a six paragraph argumentative essay. See essay rubric in packet. 
  • Final test will be given on Tuesday, May 26. You are expected to be able to use the vocabulary words correctly in a paragraph. 

May 18/19, 2015
Define the following words: 
  1. Reputation
  2. Indulge
  3. Consumption
  4. Perception
  5. Lauded
  6. Significantly
  7. Antioxidant
  8. Peripheral
  9. Cognitive
  10. Potentially
Complete the Article of the Month Template

May 15, 2015
Reading Day

May 14, 2015
"The Iditarod Trail" by Ellen M. Dolan  pages 303-311 in blue literature book
Write a 5 paragraph essay: Do you think there is a difference between doing the right thing and being a hero?
Paragraph 1: Introduction  Do NOT say, "In the story."
Paragraphs 2-4: Textual evidence and commentary.  Do NOT say, "I think."
Paragraph 5: Conclusion
    8 sentences per paragraph! Really!


May 13, 20115
  • "The Charge of the Light Brigade" by Alfred Lord Tennyson

  • Do you consider the soldiers of the Light Brigade to be heros? Why or why not? 
    • Consider
      • lines 11-12 of the poem
      • how the soldiers fought
      • the outcome of the tragic charge
  • How do you think the speaker of the poem feels about the Light Brigade?
    • Why do you think this is so?
  • What if a number of the soldiers had refused to obey the order to charge? 
    • What do you think would have happened?
  • How might the Russian gunners have perceived the charge?
    • Describe the attack from their point of view.
  • Do you think a tragedy like this suicidal charge could happen today?
    • Why or why not?

A. Note the lines that support your answers.
1. What seems to be the greatest strength of the Light Brigade?
2. What seems to be the greatest strength of their enemy?
B. Write the letter of the best answer
  1. According to the poem, what is the purpose of the charge?
    1. to rescue prisoners
    2. to take an enemy-held town
    3. to attack the enemy gunners
  2. Which characteristics of the soldiers does the speaker most admire?
    1. their courage and devotion
    2. their military training and skills
    3. their intelligence and common sense
C. Answer one of the following question based on your understanding of the poem. 
  1. Do you agree with the speaker of the poem that the Light Brigade and its action should be honored? Explain your opinion
  2. Do you think the message of this poem is anti-war? Explain
D. Answer: Linking Literature to Life. Answer the following question based on your own experience and knowledge. 
  • Is there a goal or cause for which you would be willing "to do or die" without doubt or complaint? Explain

May 11/12, 2015
After reading this story, write a four paragraph editorial addressing one aspect of the story. 

May 8, 2015
Reading Day

May 6/7, 2015

Create a chart showing what courage means to you. 
Think of at least three people (maybe more) and their brave deeds. 
 Courage


 People     Brave Deeds
1.
2.
3.
4.
5. 
6.
7. 
8.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.



"The Chief's Daughter" by Rosemary Sutcliff pages 261-270
Historical Connection
"The Chief's Daughter" is a story about two courageous young people that is set in prehistoric Wales, sometime between 3000 and 50 BC. This age was full of danger and mystery. Families banded together in clans to increase their chances of survival and chose a courageous warrior to be their chief, or protector. They built their bothies, or huts, on high ground so that they could detect enemy warrior at a distance. When threatened, the entire clan took refuge within a stockade--a stronghold protected by a barrier of stakes driven into the ground. Above all, a clan needed to protect its source of water. Some clans prayed to a mother-goddess that they associated with water. In her honor, clans sometimes erected a tall stone, called a menhir. They even resorted to human sacrifice to appease the mother-goddess. (McDougal Littell The Language of Literature)

After reading the story, add to your courage chart. 
Finally, create a picture using images or words to describe Nessan. 

May 4/5, 2015
DRP Reading Assessment


May 1, 2015
Reading Day
Homework make up
Book talks

April 30, 2014
Write a story in dialogue using a class pass along technique.

April 27-29, 2015
SAGE testing

April 24, 2015
Reading Day :)

April 23, 2015
If I Can Stop One Heart From Breaking by Emily Dickinson
IF I can stop one heart from breaking,
I shall not live in vain;
If I can ease one life the aching,
Or cool one pain,
Or help one fainting robin        5
Unto his nest again,
I shall not live in vain.


If I Could 3rd period


April 22, 2015
Homeless by Anna Quinlin page 123
Bums in the Attic by Sandra Cisneros page 125
Venn Diagram Text to Text and Text to Self connections. 


April 20/21, 2015
Please define the bolded words 
  1. drone
  2. thwart
  3. sonar
  4. enthusiastic
  5. robust
  6. enclosure
  7. detection
  8. potential
  9. the bends
  10. complex
Annotate at least ten times
Write a response of your choice. Make sure to write using complete sentences. Start your response with background information, assuming that the reader has not read the article. You must write at least 8 sentences in your response. Some responses options: informative, argumentative, emotional response, creative non-fiction (this means it is true, but written in a creative manner), first person perspective (from the perspective of the dolphin), or some other response of your choice. 



Training Dolphins







Fractured Fairy Tale is due on Wednesday!

April 17, 2015
Reading Day

April 16, 2015
Fractured Fairytale assignment. 
Students must earn a 24/30 to show mastery. 
A 27 is needed to earn an A.
Grade will be posted on 4/22. If your students has not achieved mastery, they will have an I which will invite them to continue working during Plus Time. 

Homework assignment: Visit Sageportal.org and take the practice Sage language arts test. Bring your completed parent sheet by April 24, 2015 for credit. 
  • Type sageportal.org
  • Click on Students and Families
  • Sign In (you will be using the "Guest" sign in )
  • Choose your student's grade level
  • Click yes
  • Start Reading Language and Listening Grades 6-8
  • Click on Select
  • Click on--Yes, Start my test
  • Follow the directions on Sound Check, then click yes
  • Click on Continue
  • Review test instructions and help--Then click Begin Test Now.
When you have complete this activity with your student, please sign the green form and have your student return it to school

April 15, 2015
Two poems by Robert Frost

The Pasture

I'm going out to clean the pasture spring;
I'll only stop to rake the leaves away
(And wait to watch the water clear, I may):
I shan't be gone long. -- You come too. 

I'm going out to fetch the little calf
That's standing by the mother. It's so young,
It totters when she licks it with her tongue.
I shan't be gone long. -- You come too. 



A Time to Talk

When a friend calls to me from the road 
And slows his horse to a meaning walk, 
I don't stand still and look around 
On all the hills I haven't hoed, 
And shout from where I am, What is it? 
No, not as there is a time to talk. 
I thrust my hoe in the mellow ground, 
Blade-end up and five feet tall, 
And plod: I go up to the stone wall 
For a friendly visit. 

Using a spider web graphic organizer, write several things you like to do with your friends. 
Now write a simple poem about one of those activities. Do not try to rhyme. Just describe your time with a friend. 


April 13/14, 2015
The Last Cover  by Paul Annixter
The Last Cover selection test (it is in the green basket in our classroom).


Grimm's Fairy Tales
209 Fairy Tales  full texts

April 3, 2015
Reading Day

April 2, 2015
Fractured Fairy Tale

April 1, 2015
Continue working on your fractured fairy tale.
Completed fairy tale must be at least 500 words long.

March 30 and 31, 2015
Vocabulary Test on Prefixes, Suffixes, and Roots
Today we will begin to fracture fairy tales by rewriting the setting of a story. 

March 27, 2015
Reading day. Today we will speed date books. Each student will have the opportunity to read the beginning pages of 9 or 10 books. Sometimes we don't try new books because we don't know what they are about. Today we will get the beginning taste of an assortment of books. 

March 26, 2015
More time to work on ISIS assignment. 

March 25, 2015
Little Snow White, 7th grade style (class play).

March 23/24, 2015

Quizlet review--final test on Monday, March 30 or Tuesday, March 31. 

ISIS Article of the Week due on Sunday at midnight. 



March 20, 2015
Vocabulary Test 27
Reading Day

March 19, 2015
Write an 8 sentence descriptive paragraph for the following photo. 


Choose one of the forests (silver, gold, or diamond) and describe it in your own words. Be creative. Write 8 sentences.


March 18, 2015
Finish reading Rapunzel
Annotate the story, identify the protagonist, the antagonist, the conflict, the crisis, and the resolution. Make sure to have at least 9 annotations (three per page). Identify the moral of the story. 


March 16/17, 2015
anachronism
chronic
chronicle
chronological
contemporary
extemporaneous
synchronize
tempo
temporal
temporary

Grammar practice
FANBOYS
Proper nouns

Beginning of Fairy Tale unit



March 11, 2015
Chapter 14 Watsons Go to Birmingham
Segregation (talk to your parents about how it felt to be segregated).

March 9/10, 2015

The Root -mov-
commotion
demotion
immobilize
locomotion
mobile
momentary
momentum
motive
promotion
remote

Watsons Go to Birmingham chapter 13

Writing Response:
Think of a time you did something an adult told you not to do. What did you learn from that? What would/should you have done differently?

March 6, 2015
Vocabulary Test 25
Reading Day
Today is the last day to do book talks for full credit. 

March 5, 2015
Watsons Go to Birmingham chapter 11
Video clip showing Civil Rights marches and police response


March 4, 2015
Civil Rights reports due!
Watsons go to Birmingham chapter 10


March 2 & 3, 2015
Vocabulary Lesson 25
-bio-
-viv-
antibiotic
biopsy
biosphere
devitalize
microbe
revive
symbiosis
viable
vitality
vivid

Last day to work on Civil Rights research paper. Completed paper is due on Wednesday, March 4.

February 27, 2015
Vocabulary Lesson 24 test
Reading Day

February 26, 2015
Continued work on Civil Rights research project. 

Wikipedia cite this page


Choose MLA format, copy (control C) and paste into your document (control V). 
You need three sources (only one can be Wikipedia).

February 25, 2015

The Story of Ruby Bridges by Robert Coles, Illustrated by George Ford

A Brief Summary of Ruby’s Life

When the United States federal government in 1960 ordered the desegregation of New Orleans public schools, a young African American student named Ruby Bridges and her family were thrust into the national spotlight. Ruby was born in Tylertown, Mississippi in 1954. In 1957, economic conditions forced her family to move to New Orleans where her father worked as a custodian and her mother cleaned floors at a bank. The entire family was actively involved in the church and their neighborhood community. When integration was ordered, the NAACP backed Ruby’s assignment to a first grade class at William Frantz Elementary School. The president was forced to call up Federal Marshals to maintain order and insure safety. Ruby was soon the only student attending Frantz, as hostile white parents withdrew their children and protested at the school each day. Despite the continuous harassment that Ruby and her parents faced, she continued to attend Frantz Elementary from which she graduated and moved on to high school. Though Ruby never went to college, she is now quite successful. Now Ruby Bridges Hall, she has raised four children, lectures around the country, wrote a book of her own, Through My Eyes, and heads the Ruby Bridges Foundation, which consults with schools to develop diversity programs and increase parental involvement.


Themes

  • The importance of education

  • Racial equality and tolerance

  • Overcoming hatred

  • Civil Rights


Introductory Activity

  • Norman Rockwell’s painting “The Problem We All Live With”

    • Discuss what this picture shows, says, causes you to feel.

      • Notice the racial slur, the KKK, and also notice that the emphasis of the picture is on the little girl, not the adult men.



Selected Passages to Be Used in Discussion

  • At that time, black children and white children went to separate schools in New Orleans.

  • The white people in the neighborhood would not send their children to school.

  • Every day, Ruby went into the classroom with a big smile on her face, ready to get down to the business of learning.

  • So Ruby began learning how to read and write in an empty classroom, an empty building.

  • Every day Ruby would stop and pray.

  • Afterword: We’ve been sitting back and letting our children get cheated out of an education because some people have tried to take the law into their own hands.


Discussion Questions

  • Why was it so important to Ruby’s parents to send her to William Frantz Elementary School?

  • Could she have gotten as good of an education at another school?

  • Comparing the painting and the story, how would you have felt as a parent to send your child into this mob? What lesson were the Bridges teaching Ruby? What were they teaching the world? How did this experience change the face of the United States?

  • Comparing this story and the lessons we have learned from Frederick Douglass, why is education so important? What did each (Douglass and Ruby Bridges) do because they valued education?

  • Why wouldn’t the city or state police protect Ruby? Why did the President need to bring in the national guard?

  • How did Ruby’s continued attendance begin to break down racial barriers?

  • What can we do at Centennial to break down racial and social barriers?


Follow-up activity

Writing Assignment:

  • Write a letter to the editor of a newspaper (If you want, you may write one to Randolph Heart)

    • Discuss race, racial tensions, racial tolerance.

    • Use personal antidotes to strengthen your letter

    • Be aware of audience (this should be a semi-formal letter, but it may be written in first person).



February 23/24, 2015
Vocabulary lesson 24 Quizlet
-flect
-flu
affluent
deflect
flex
fluctuate
fluid
flume
inflexible
influential
influx
reflex

Continue research on Civil Rights activist


February 20, 2015
Vocabulary and spelling test for lesson 23
Silent Reading

February 19, 2015 
Watsons Go to Birmingham--1963
Second half of chapter 9

  • Dad explains that the world is a tough place, especially for African Americans, and Byron needs to be ready for it. He needs to stop fooling around and grow up. Dad says Byron needs to see this tough world for himself, and that's why he has to spend the summer in Alabama.
  • Kenny starts thinking about how hard it must be to be a grownup. He tells Dad that being a grownup seems real scary and he doesn't think he'll ever learn how to do it.
  • Dad says being a grownup is scary at first, but with some practice it gets a little easier. He confesses that he and Momma don't always know for sure if they're doing the right thing either.
  • Preparations for the trip continue, and one day, their neighbor, Mrs. Davidson, comes over to give Joey a going-away present.
  • It's an angel—Mrs. Davidson says it reminds her of Joey.
  • The trouble is, it's a chubby white angel with blue eyes. The only thing that resembles Joey is the dimple in her smile.
  • Joey looks upset for a second, but she covers well and politely thanks Mrs. Davidson.
  • Then she goes upstairs and puts the angel in her sock drawer.
  • When Momma goes up to check on her, Joey explains about the angel not looking anything like her. Joey seems upset that Mrs. Davidson would say a white angel looks like her when she isn't white.
  • Everyone is packing and getting ready for the trip, except for Byron.
  • Byron is behaving as though nothing is going on. He's playing it cool.
  • That's because he has a plan to sneak out and make a run for it the night before they leave. (Though, where does he think he would go?)
  • Joey rats him out so that Momma and Dad won't kill him for running away. They make Byron sleep in their room for the last night.
  • The next morning, they get up early and get on I-75 which will take them all the way from Flint to Birmingham.
  • In the car, Momma reads her three-day trip plan out of her notebook. She has figured out everything from where they'll stop to what they'll eat to who will sit next to the windows each day of the drive.
  • Kenny asks why they don't just drive until Dad is tired and then stop. Yeah, why not do that? Maybe they can make it in less than three days, right?
  • Dad gets into his Southern hillbilly accent and explains that down in the Deep South, black folks can't just stop anywhere. He makes a joke out of it for the kids, but this all sounds a little sinister to us.
  • Momma brought all sorts of books and puzzles and games to keep the troops entertained for three days, but Kenny is more interested in what Byron will do.
  • Mini flashback: a few days ago, Buphead was visiting and Byron revealed his plan for getting back at Momma and Dad. He knew Momma was going to want to play games like counting cows or red cars while they drive. Byron said that for the whole trip, no matter what happened, he wouldn't say one word. Silent treatment. Byron thought that if he refused to talk, it would upset the family and ruin the trip for everyone.
  • Kenny waits to see if he'll really do it.
  • But by the time they get to Detroit (like an hour into the trip), Byron has already opened his mouth to ask about who gets to choose the music for the Ultra-Glide.
  • Kenny can't resist.
  • He says, "I guess you really showed them, didn't you? Boy, they were really begging you to talk, weren't they, Daddy-o?" (9.149).
  • Good one.
  • Byron gives Kenny the middle finger.
  • Kenny asks how many cows Byron has counted.
  • Byron responds with a "Yo Momma" joke. (Which confuses Kenny since, don't they have the same mom? Yeah.)
  • Kenny calls Byron the Lipless Wonder (remember, from when he froze his lips to the car?). That really hits a nerve. Byron tries to grab Kenny, but Dad finally stops the fight.
  • All this in the first hour? Sounds like it's gonna be a long trip.

February 18, 2015

Civil Rights Project due on March 4, 2015

MLA format
Make sure you fill in as many items as you can before you create the citation. 
Copy and paste the MLA citation onto your paper.  The second line should be indented 5 spaces. 

Yang, Gene Luen, and Lark Pien. Boxers. 1st ed. New York City: 
       Firstsecondbooks, 2013. 225. Print.

After you have read your book or article, write a well crafted paragraph. This should include a summary, what you found helpful, what wasn't helpful. You might include a quote that you want to use in your paper. 

You need three sources, only one can be Wikipedia. 


February 17, 2014
Vocabulary Lesson 23  Quizlet Lesson 23
calligraphy
cartography
demography
epigram
graphic
holography
monogram
monograph
seismograph
typography

Watson's Go to Birmingham Chapter 9
  • The next Sunday morning, Kenny and Dad are sitting in the car listening to records while everyone else is still asleep.
  • Kenny asks Dad if they really have to leave Byron in Alabama. Hang on, Kenny, weren't you the one excited about this?
  • Dad explains that Byron is learning all the wrong things in Flint, and he needs to live somewhere else in order to learn the right things. Kenny doesn't get it.
  • Dad asks Kenny if he's seen on the news some of what's been going on in the South. Kenny has seen some pictures of the riots and protests over the Civil Rights Movement, but he doesn't really understand it.
  • Dad explains that the world is a tough place, especially for African Americans, and Byron needs to be ready for it. He needs to stop fooling around and grow up. Dad says Byron needs to see this tough world for himself, and that's why he has to spend the summer in Alabama.





February 13, 2015
We will have a spelling and vocabulary test before we begin reading. Study the Quizlet and your vocabulary list in order to be ready. 

Reading Day

February 12, 2015
Career Day, no English class.


February 9 -11, 2015
Lesson 22 Vocabulary (suffixes - philia and -phobia)
  1. acrophobia
  2. agoraphobia
  3. ailurophobia
  4. Anglophile
  5. audiophile
  6. bibliophile
  7. claustrophobia
  8. hydrophobia
  9. xenophobia
  10. zoophobia
  11. -phobia
  12. -philia
Click on the hyperlink and join the class. This will allow you to participate in the activities and for me to track your progress. 

Chapter 8 The Watsons Go to Birmingham--1963


The Ultra-Glide




February  6, 2015
Reading Day

February 2, 2015 through February 5, 2015
SAGE testing

January 30, 2015


Friday is a reading day in our classes. Students should come to class with a book ready to read. If you don’t have a book, you need to read a CHAPTER book (not an ology book or a Ripley’s book).


During the last 5 minutes, fill out a reading log with a summary of what you read.


January 29, 2015

Thursday: Chapter 6 “Swedish Cremes and Welfare Cheese”

Class discussion: Why is Byron doing what Byron is doing?

  • How does Byron feel about welfare?

  • Why do you think he used credit to get the cookies?

  • Why does he eat all of the cookies?

  • How does eating the cookies suck Kenny into the lie?

  • What is a mourning dove?

  • Why do the boys throw cookies at the dove?

  • How does Kenny respond to hitting the dove?

  • How does Byron respond to hitting the dove?

  • Byron’s behavior is confusing to Kenny, explain.

If you have extra time, begin reading chapter 7 on your own. You can finish this chapter on Friday during reading time.



January 28, 2015
Watsons Go to Birmingham chapter 5 
  • What do you think about Momma's treatment of Byron?
Please write an alternate punishment in a letter form. Imagine that you are giving Momma a suggestion on how she should have punished Byron. 

Letter format:
Dear Momma, 
Three body paragraphs, 
Sincerely, 
Your name

January 26 and 27, 2015
Watsons Go to Birmingham chapter 4
Discussion ideas
  • Why do bullies do what bullies do?
  • How does poverty shape a child?
    • Think of Larry Dunn and how he is dressed. Why do you think he bullies smaller children?
    • Why does Byron bully the bully?
    • Why does Kenny feel so bad watching Byron bully Larry?
Time was given in class today to work on "Wetlands" essay. Remember, mastery is a 24 on the essay. 

January 23, 2013
Friday Reading Celebration! Please come to class prepared to read for the entire 45 minute period. 

January 22, 2015
Writing Prompt: How do Frederick Douglass and Kenny Watson view literacy and education? How do Frederick Douglass and Byron Watson view literacy and education?  How are they similar and how are they different? Compare yourself to Frederick Douglass. Is education important to you? Please write a four paragraph response to this prompt. 

Watsons Go to Birmingham--1963 Chapter 3

January 20-21, 2014
Explanatory Essay--no counter claim for this essay. 
UtahCompose.org

Login information:
User name:  000SSID
Password: Your lunch number (five numbers)
Make sure you sign in to the top English class, that is this term's class.  If you are still revising your Mistakes in Science essay, you will find that in the bottom English class (last term). Remember, a score of 24 is required to show mastery, until then I will override your grade with an incomplete (even if your score is above a 70%). 

This essay's grade will go into the grade book on Wednesday, January 28. 


January 16, 2015
This term, we are doing an experiment with reading days. Each English class will dedicate Friday to in class reading. Students are expected to bring a book to class to read. This time may go on reading logs. The book I am currently reading during Friday classes is The House of the Scorpion by Nancy Farmer.

January 15, 2015
Key information about January 1963

[edit]Events

[edit]January

[edit]

Chapter 2 Watson Go to Birmingham

Give My Regards to Clark, Poindexter

  • In this chapter, Kenny gives us the lay of the land for Clark Elementary School.
  • Larry Dunn is the king of Kindergarten to fourth grade. He's king because he's bigger, stronger, and older than everyone else on account of flunking two or three grades.
  • If Larry is king, then Byron is a god. He's in sixth grade and is also older than everyone because he flunked at least once.
  • Buphead is Byron's best friend and fellow juvenile delinquent. What did you expect with a name like Buphead?
  • Kenny thinks that being related to the god of Clark Elementary ought to make him "a prince or a real strong angel," but he's just another "fourth-grade punk" (2.4). However, there are a few benefits to being related to Byron.
  • Kenny tells us there are two things that ought to get him teased a lot more than he is.
  • First, he's real smart. Like so smart that his teachers parade him around to the older classes so he can show off his mad reading skills.
  • Kenny expects to be reamed for this on the playground, but it turns out Byron is sort of proud of him, so nobody really bothers Kenny about being smart.
  • Second, Kenny has a lazy eye, which means that one of his eyes is always kind of crossed. Byron helps Kenny figure out how to look at people sideways so his lazy eye is less noticeable and he doesn't get teased as much.
  • Kenny tells us the teasing is only really bad on the bus on days when Byron cuts school. On those days, as Kenny boards the bus, Byron says, "Give my regards to Clark, Poindexter" (Poindexter = nerd. Advanced Name-Calling 101).
  • Then one day, everything changes when two new kids get on the bus.
  • Kenny starts telling us about Sunday school and how God sends a personal saver to protect everyone. Feeling confused? Us too.
  • Then Kenny explains that the older new boy with torn clothes and raggedy shoes is his personal saver. How? Well, Kenny thinks the new kid will be easier to make fun of, so if everyone's teasing the new kid, they won't be teasing Kenny as much.
  • And he's right. Larry Dunn and the others jump all over the new kids until the bus driver pushes them both into Kenny's seat.
  • Kenny just looks at them sideways and doesn't say anything.



January 14, 2015
Commonly Confused Words Test
Chapter 1 Watsons Go to Birmingham by Christopher Paul Curtis

And You Wonder Why We Get Called the Weird Watsons

  • So, it's cold. Super-duper, spit freezing cold. And according to our narrator, Kenny, you would be stupid to go outside. In fact, it's so cold outside that it's also cold inside, and Kenny's family is huddled together on the couch, trying to keep warm.
  • While they're huddling and shivering, we learn that Kenny's family consists of Momma, Dad, little sister Joetta (Joey), and big brother Byron (an official teenage juvenile delinquent). They live in Flint, Michigan where the whole family was born. Oh, except for Momma, who is from Alabama and doesn't seem too happy about this cold, northerly weather.
  • To distract everyone from the cold, Dad starts telling the story of how Momma almost married Moses Henderson instead of him. Dad thinks this story is hilarious.
  • Momma points out that if she'd married Moses, at least they'd all be warm and living in Birmingham where "life is slower, the people are friendlier" (1.25). Dad is quick to remind her of the "Coloreds Only" bathroom in downtown Birmingham. The what bathroom?
  • Dad seems to know this conversation is about to become an argument, so he calls Aunt Cydney, who has a brand new furnace, to see if they can spend the night.
  • Then he sends Byron and Kenny out to scrape the ice off the Brown Bomber (it's what they call their car... and we're beginning to see the weird).
  • Outside, Kenny and Byron are each scraping one side of the Bomber when Byron starts mumbling Kenny's name. Now, Byron is a known and ruthless prankster, so Kenny ignores him, assuming it's a trick. Our man Kenny's been around the block once or twice.
  • When Kenny finally does take a look, he finds that Byron's lips are stuck to the side mirror on the car. That's right; his lips froze to the mirror. How did his lips, of all things, get stuck to the car?
  • Well, Kenny doesn't stop to wonder and he doesn't pull any pranks (even though Byron would have certainly pranked Kenny if he was the one stuck); he just runs inside to get help. That Kenny is one of the good ones.
  • The whole family follows Kenny outside to see Byron. Momma screams and nearly faints. Joey starts crying. Dad starts laughing and making jokes—he figures out that the only way a person gets his lips stuck to a mirror is if he was making out with his own reflection. Nice one, By.
  • After some debate, the Weird Watsons decide to try pouring hot water on the mirror to unfreeze Byron's lips. The trouble is, it is so super-duper cold outside that the water freezes as soon as it touches the mirror. Uh oh. What now?
  • Momma starts freaking out and demands that Dad take Byron to the hospital. Dad points out that Byron would have to run alongside the car for that to work. Not an option.
  • Momma sends everybody inside to call the hospital and ask what to do. Dad and Joey go inside, but Kenny senses Momma is up to something, so he stays.
  • Momma starts talking real nice to Byron, saying she loves him and she'd never hurt him. Now Byron is suspicious too and he starts yelling for help as Momma grabs his head and yanks him off the mirror. Ouch! Byron runs in the house crying.
  • In the car on the way to Aunt Cydney's, Kenny finally takes advantage of the situation and invents a superhero called the Lipless Wonder in honor of Byron. The whole family cracks up, except Byron of course.
  • This round goes to Kenny.

January 12/13, 2015
Remember, your argumentative essay must be completed on UtahCompose.com. A score which shows mastery is at least a 24. You may revise until you reach this score. 

Audio  begin at 1:14:07

January 5/6, 2015
Argumentative essay practice
Please pay attention to transition words and phrases. Choose three or four that you are comfortable with and use them in this essay. 
This essay will be turned in at the end of class today. If you miss class, you are responsible for doing it on your own time. Give yourself 90 minutes to complete the assignment. 

December 17-19, 2014
A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens. 

December 15 / 16, 2014
BOOK TALKS!  
What book did you read?
Who is the author?
Who are the main characters?
Who is the protagonist?
Who is the antagonist?
Give three rising actions.
What is the crisis?
Would you recommend this book?
On a 1-5 scale (one is low, 5 is high), how would your rank this book?
What age reader would enjoy this book?

December 8-12, 2014
SAGE interim writing assessment
Bring your own headphones for this testing. 

December 4-5, 2014
"The Christmas Hunt" by Borden Deal (pages 455-459 in blue literature book)
Responding options page 470
    Answer questions 1-7 (reflect, rethink, relate)

December 3, 2014
Today I will write a rough draft of an argumentative essay. I will include an introduction, 3 body paragraphs with evidence and commentary, a counterclaim paragraph and a conclusion.

You have seen this before, but here it is again.

Introduction
  • Background of the topic
  • Claim
Body Paragraph (at least 3)
  • Topic sentence
  • Evidence
  • Commentary (or warrant--Hulk worksheet)
  • Further commentary
  • Evidence
  • Commentary
  • Further commentary
  • Transition sentence
Counterclaim paragraph
  • Topic sentence
  • Counter claim--this is the opposing opinion
  • Evidence
  • Rebuttal--this is commentary explaining why the evidence doesn't sway the claim
  • Transition sentence
Conclusion
  • Final explanation on how you have defended your claim. Do Not say "In conclusion". Not, not, not!
December 1 and 2, 2014
Who Would Win a Fight: Batman or Captain America?
Write an essay arguing whether Batman or Captain America would win in a fight. 
Your essay must be based on ideas, concepts, and information from the Batman 
and Captain America passages. 

Manage your time carefully
  • Plan your essay
  • Write your essay
  • Revise and edit your essay
Be sure to:
  • Include a claim
  • Address counterclaims
  • Use evidence from each source
DO NOT OVER RELY ON ONE SOURCE!


Batman vs Captain America: Fanboy Faceoff: Link to clean youtube video.




The Hulk outline is due on Wednesday. We will begin writing the essay in class on Wednesday, December 3.


November 24/25, 2014
Today we started class with 30 minutes of silent reading. While you read, you were to find three strong descriptions and write them in your journal. 

Article of the Week


November 21, 2014
  • What creates our culture?
  • How does cultural intolerance displayed in the story?
  • What does the term equity mean?
  • How does equity interplay with equality?
  • When the grandfather refuses to pay for the jacket, what point was he making?
  • Why does Martha still receive the jacket?

November 20, 2014
Please finish your ten line alliteration poem. Today will also be a reading day and a make up day. :)

November 19, 2014
RL 7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes and other repetitions of sounds (e.g., alliteration) on a specific verse or stanza of a poem or section of a story or drama.

Today I will read poetry and analyze how format influences meaning. I will be able to identify alliteration and assonance in a poem. 

Alliteration in Poems

There are numerous examples of alliteration in poems. For example:

Poe

Here are examples of alliteration taken from The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe:

  • Once upon a midnight dreary while I pondered weak and weary
  • ...rare and radiant maiden
  • And the silken sad uncertain rustling of each purple curtain
  • Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there wondering, fearing, Doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before

In this Poe poem, weak and weary; rare and radiant; silken and sad; deep and darkness; and wondering and fearing are all examples of alliteration.

Other Literary Examples

  • Hot-hearted Beowulf was bent upon battle - from Beowulf. This example of Medieval Anglo-Saxon poetry contains alliteration using Beowulf, bent and battle.
  • Behemoth, biggest born of earth, upheaved His vastness - from Paradise Lost by John Milton. This example also contains alliteration with Behemoth and biggest born.
  • Fly o'er waste fens and windy fields - from Sir Galahad by Alfred Tennyson. The example contains alliteration with fly, fens and fields.
  • Mary sat musing on the lamp-flame at the table - from The Death of the Hired Man by Robert Frost. Here, the alliteration is Mary and musing.
  • For the sky and the sea, and the sea and the sky - from the Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Samuel Taylor Coleridge. Sky and sea are alliterative devices here.

Alliteration in Nursery Rhymes

Mother Goose poems contain a great deal of alliteration. For example:

Betty Botter by Mother Goose

Betty Botter bought some butter, but, she said, the butter’s bitter; if I put it in my batter it will make my batter bitter, but a bit of better butter will make my batter better.

So she bought a bit of butter better than her bitter butter, and she put it in her batter and the batter was not bitter. So ’twas better Betty Botter bought a bit of better butter.

Three Grey Geese by Mother Goose

Three grey geese in a green field grazing, Grey were the geese and green was the grazing.

Baker’s Reply to the Needle Salesman by Unknown

I need not your needles, They’re needless to me, For kneading of needles, Were needless, you see; But did my neat trousers, But need to be kneed, I then should have need of your needles indeed. 

Alliteration in Tongue Twisters

Alliteration also makes tongue twisters even more difficult to say:

  • Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers. A peck of pickled peppers Peter Piper picked. If Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers How many pickled peppers did Peter Piper pick?
  • How much wood would a woodchuck chuck If a woodchuck would chuck wood? A woodchuck would chuck all the wood he could chuck If a woodchuck would chuck wood.
  • Silly Sally swiftly shooed seven silly sheep. The seven silly sheep Silly Sally shooed shilly-shallied south. These sheep shouldn’t sleep in a shack; Sheep should sleep in a shed.

Alliteration in Children's Books

Dr. Suess commonly used alliteration to make his books imminently readable. For example:

Through three cheese trees three free fleas flew. While these fleas flew, freezy breeze blew. Freezy breeze made these three trees freeze. Freezy trees made these trees’ cheese freeze. That’s what made these three free fleas sneeze.

Alliteration in Advertising

Alliteration has also become a common tool in advertising. Check out these two examples:

  • “You'll never put a better bit of butter on your knife." (advertising slogan for Country Life butter)
  • "The daily diary of the American dream." (a slogan of The Wall Street Journal)

Alliteration Then and Now

The application of alliteration in poetry and literature began ages ago, at the time when literature was born. It was widely applied in the 8th century poem entitled Beowulf for instance. Alliteration was widely celebrated in the writings of the most ancient Germanic and Norse works, including the prose, Edda.

Alliteration is a creative tool used in turning prose and poetry into more interesting and memorable pieces of literature, especially when recited. This device is now even commonly used by advertisers to create witty and memorable catchphrases and tag lines. It’s a fun play of words that brings out the imagination of the writer and the reader. 


How to Identify Alliteration

The best way to spot alliteration being used in a sentence is to sound out the sentence, looking for the words with the identical consonant sounds. For example, read through these sentences to test your skills in identifying alliteration:

  1. Alice’s aunt ate apples and acorns around August.
  2. Becky’s beagle barked and bayed, becoming bothersome for Billy.
  3. Carrie's cat clawed her couch, creating chaos.
  4. Dan’s dog dove deep in the dam, drinking dirty water as he dove.
  5. Eric’s eagle eats eggs, enjoying each episode of eating.
  6. Fred’s friends fried Fritos for Friday’s food.
  7. Garry’s giraffe gobbled gooseberryies greedily, getting good at grabbing goodies.
  8. Hannah’s home has heat hopefully.
  9. Isaacs ice cream is interesting and Isaac is imbibing it.
  10. Jesse’s jaguar is jumping and jiggling jauntily.
  11. Kim’s kid’s kept kiting.
  12. Larry’s lizard likes leaping leopards.
  13. Mike’s microphone made much music.
  14. Nick’s nephew needed new notebooks now not never.
  15. Orson’s owl out-performed ostriches.
  16. Peter’s piglet pranced priggishly.
  17. Quincy’s quilters quit quilting quickly.
  18. Ralph’s reindeer rose rapidly and ran round the room.
  19. Sara’s seven sisters slept soundly in sand.
  20. Tim’s took tons of tools to make toys for tots.
  21. Uncle Uris’ united union uses umbrellas.
  22. Vivien’s very vixen-like and vexing.
  23. Walter walked wearily while wondering where Wally was.
  24. Yarvis yanked you at yoga, and Yvonne yelled.
  25. Zachary zeroed in on zoo keeping.
Assignments

1.  Make a list of 15 brand names that use alliteration. (Hint, Dunkin' Donuts).

2.  Next, create a poem using your name. Each line needs to have at least three alliterations that match the letter from your name.
Example for Susana:

Surely she should sing in the shower
Unless her umbrella undermines the rain
Simply said, Susanna sounds superb
Announcing autumn's amazing array
Never noticing the nakedness of her neighbor's trees
Ash and oak, approaching winter with awe.

If your name is less than five letters long, use your first and last name. Your poem should have ten lines. 


November 17/18, 2014
Writing Standard 7.3b Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

Today I will read a story written entirely in dialogue. I will evaluate how dialogue moves a story along. I will create my own story using only dialogue.

Read the story one time straight through. Next read it and label each of the three characters lines (Skip, Master Johnston, the dragon). 
We will read this piece as a play in class. 

After reading this story, I would like each of you to write a story entirely in dialogue. The story must be at least 40 lines long and have at least two characters. 


November 14, 2014
Complete "Cloning" packet by writing a short opinion essay about cloning. The cloning packet is due at the end of class today. 

November 13, 2014
Cloning Debate--these points cannot be made up. If you were absent, you will not be penalized for missing the debate. 

November 12, 2014
Today we finished reading Boy

We began working on the vocabulary page in "Cloning" packet during class. 
Homework--Complete vocabulary sheet. Read problem of the week and thinking scientifically as homework. 

November 10/11, 2014
Article of the Week 
"Cloning, Threat or Opportunity"

What makes you who you are? Both your genes and your experiences have an impact on your identity.Your genes contain information about your own unique design. They help determine many of your features, such as your eye color, your height, and which hand you use to write.Scientists have invented a process called cloning that allows them to copy the genes of living things, or organisms. Scientists transfer some of an adult organism’s genes to a new egg. After the transfer, a clone or copy of the original organism starts to develop. Researchers are using one type of cloning to study new treatments for diseases like cancer. They believe that cloning has the potential to help people with serious illnesses. Many farmers are cloning plants to produce crops featuring qualities that people like, such as juiciness in tomatoes. Some farmers are interested in cloning animals, too. For instance, they want to clone cattle that produce particularly tasty and tender beef. In the future, scientists may be able to clone a person. This process could create identical twins born at different times. But is that a good idea? Many people worry about how cloning will impact our lives. What would happen if people could design other people? What if, for example, leaders could choose the features they wanted their soldiers to have and then make an army of clones? What if parents could clone their children? Should people be allowed to clone their pets? How might we take advantage of the benefits cloning offers while preventing potential problems?




November 7, 2014
I sure hope you had a good day with the substitute. I learned so many things at the UCTE conference. I will use some of those things in the upcoming weeks. 

Your assignment while I was gone was to write a complete essay about year round school. The essay format is as follows:


Essay

Introduction paragraph. This paragraph should state the issue, give some background, and then have a claim. You should shoot for at least 5 sentences for this paragraph.


Three body paragraphs: These paragraphs have a topic sentence and then two pieces of evidence with commentary to support the evidence.

Topic sentence

1st evidence

Two sentences of commentary

2nd evidence

Two sentences of commentary

Conclusion or transition sentence.


Counterclaim paragraph (this is paragraph 5)

Topic sentence---this is your counter claim

Evidence

Two sentences of commentary supporting your evidence.


Conclusion

This paragraph should be about five sentences long. Wrap up your ideas.



November 6, 2013
Job Shadow--Don't forget to bring your green Job Shadow sheet back to school in order to get credit for being at school. 

 
November 5, 2014
Today we finished the SAGE test. 
Students that were done or completed during class were able to read forward in BOY.  These students began at page 108 and read through the class period. 


November 3/4, 2014

Article of the Week "Summer Slump" due November 7 (notice the change in due dates). 

We also listened to two chapters in Boy, 
Chapter 13 –“Homesickness”
• Roald is so homesick'he'pretends'to'have'appendicitis'in'order'to'be'sent'
home.''He'watched'his'older'sister'and'noted'her'symptoms;'they'
removed'her'appendix'on'the'nursery'table'of'his'house!
• It'works,'Roald'gets'to'go'home,'but'his'doctor'at'home'knows'he'is'
faking.''He'is'allowed'to'stay'home'for'3'days'but'told'not'to'do'it'again.

Chapter 14 –“A Drive in the Motorcar”
• Roald'is'so'happy'to'be'home'for'the'holidays.'The'freedom'is'wonderful.
• The'family'has'a'new'car,'and'they'go'for'a'ride'in'the'car.''Roald’s'ancient'
very'much'older 'half'sister'is'driving.''There'is'a'terrible'accident'–
Roald’s'nose'is'cut'almost'completely'off.'It'is'sewn'back'on'at'the'nursery'
table'where'his'sister'had'her'appendix'removed!

October 30/31, 2014
Today and tomorrow are dedicated to Halloween. We are going to step away from Boy for a couple of days in order to give the walking dead some attention. 
Haiku is a poetry form that originated in Japan. We usually say that the poem is three lines long, with each line having a set number of syllables in it. This format is 5 syllables, 7 syllables, 5 syllables. 

Imagine some of the most famous poets writing haiku about zombies. The following poems are all fakes but written in the style of famous poets. 

Zombie Haiku by Dylan Thomas
Do not go gentle
into that zombie plagued night.
And take the shotgun.

Zombie Haiku by Sylvia Plath
From head to black shoe,
daddy, I had to eat you
because I’m starving.

Zombie Haiku by Robert Frost
Two lobes in the skull.
I eat the bloodier one – 
not much difference.

Zombie Haiku by e.e. cummings
if anyone lived
in this wretched how town (they)
would be soon eaten.

Zombie Haiku by Emily Dickinson
I heard a fly buzz
when I became a zombie.
That was one loud bug.

Zombie Haiku by Walt Whitman
Every skin atom
form’d from this soil, this air,
tastes like chicken meat.

Zombie Haiku by William Shakespeare
To bite through the skull
or beat it against the wall?
That is the question.

Zombie Haiku by Edgar Allen Poe
Beside of the sea
I killed my Annabel Lee
because zombies do that.

Zombie Haiku by Theodore Roethke
I knew a woman,
piled up once I ate her,
lovely in her bones.

The goal for this lesson is to write at least three zombie haikus. 

Haiku Lesson ideas

Haiku Starter

Writing Zombie Haiku Worksheet


October 27-October 29
SAGE testing


I am going to begin posting key assignments on Google+. You can follow me and watch for those assignments. Tell me if you like this, so I can see if it is an effective tool. Thanks. 

STOP MISSING CLASS, my young friends! I LOVE TO DEATH, but the more you miss class the harder it is for you to grasp the material! IF YOU NEED HELP, then COMMUNICATE, so that I CAN ASSIST YOU!

Reading Logs 
Due Monday/Tuesday 


Article of the Week assignment:
  1. Read the article once to get the GIST. 
  2. Define the 10 bolded words 
  3. Reread the article, annotating as you go. You should have at least 10 annotative comments. 
  4. Identify the author's claim (what is the point he/she is trying to make?).
  5. Find three pieces of evidence that support the author's claim. 
Articles are due on the first day of class in a week. 



October 21, 2014
This is the last week of the term. 
  • Book talks will be done in class. Students will earn up to 40/50 points for talks from now on. This is because this assignment required them to be proactive and come in before school, after school, or during Thursday Plus time. 
  • Reading Logs are due today.
  • All late work must be in by Wednesday unless prior arrangements have been made with me. 

Learning Target: Today I will find the GIST of an informational text, annotate as I go, find the author's claim, and find three textual evidences to support the claim. 

Vocabulary for this article:
  1. throes: agony, pain, suffering
  2. compounding: exacerbating, worsening, increasing
  3. misperception: to understand incorrectly, misunderstand
  4. perspective: outlook, point of view, standpoint
  5. specific: distinct, fixed, precise
  6. repository: storehouse, cache, treasury
  7. willfully: readily, voluntarily, of one’s own will
  8. minimize: reduce, lesson, diminish
  9. camaraderie: friendship, fellowship, mutual support
  10. rooted: embedded, fixed, established



October 15, 2014
Writing Prompt: Review your compare/contrast essay. Find one textual evidence from Boy that you included in your essay. Write two analytical commentary sentences in response to your evidence. 

Classwork: Finish your rough draft of the compare/contrast essay. 
Peer edit: Share your essay with a classmate via Google.docs. 

Final essay is due October 24. This grade will go on to term 2. 


October 13/14, 2014

  • Your compare/contrast essay rough draft is due tomorrow (Tuesday). Do not print it out, we will be doing peer edits in class on Wednesday. 
  • Reading log is due each week on the first day of class each week.
  • The end of the term is October 24th. Make sure you have completed your BOOK TALK before that date. This assignment is worth 50 (fifty) points. 
  • Check all missing assignments. No late work will be accepted after Wednesday, October 22!  Get your late work in as soon as possible. 
Writing Prompt: Please describe the worst visit to the doctor you ever had. Write descriptive details, include what you saw, smelled, heard, felt (touched), and heard. Write in such a way that the reader can imagine being there. 

BOY, chapters "The Magic Island" and "A Visit to the Doctor" pages 60-71.

Revisit your writing prompt: How did your experience line up with Roald Dahl's experience?  Go back into the text and find a passage that is extremely descriptive. 
Turn this into a found poem. Remove all the extra words or phrases. Format it so that it come across as a poem instead of prose. 

Example from "The Great Mouse Plot."

The other four stared at me in wonder. Then, as the sheer genius of the plot began to sink in, they all started grinning. They slapped me on the back. They cheered me and danced around the classroom. 'We'll do it today!' they cried. 'We'll do it on the way home! You had the idea,' they said to me, 'so you can be the one to put the mouse in the jar.'

Mouse Plot

Four stared
Wonder
Sheer genius
Plot
All grinning
Slapped me
Cheered me
Danced
Around classroom
Today!
On Way
Home
Your idea
You can put
Mouse in jar




October 10, 2014
We will work for the entire class period on our compare/contrast essay. Remember, don't write a summary, write analytical commentary. See October 6/7 for paragraph formatting. Final essay is due on October 15 by midnight. If you don't finish it in class, you will need to work on it at home. 

October 9, 2014
Today we will work on the chrome books using Google.docs. 
Each of you has a student email. You can get to this using your first initial in both your first and last name plus your lunch number starting with a zero, @stu.provo.edu. Your password is your birthday 6/21/2001. Your document should be titled your last name, first name, class period, C/C Boy.


October 8, 2014

Finish the rough draft of your compare contrast essay. 

October 6/7, 2014
Writing Prompt:
Compare/Contrast how Mr. Coombs handled the boys and how Mama handled Roald. Write a multi-paragraph response. 

Introduction--5 sentences
  • Introduce the story, the conflict, the setting
Body paragraph #1  Mr. Coombs
  • Transition from the introduction that restates the main conflict. 
  • Evidence or example from the story
  • Your commentary about this example
  • More commentary
  • A second example from the book
  • Commentary about the second example
  • More commentary
  • Conclusion for this paragraph, transition to next paragraph
Body paragraph #2  Mama
  • Transition from the introduction that restates the main conflict. 
  • Evidence or example from the story
  • Your commentary about this example
  • More commentary
  • A second example from the book
  • Commentary about the second example
  • More commentary
  • Conclusion for this paragraph, transition to next paragraph
Conclusion--5 sentences
  • Lessons learned

Class Generated Example

In the book Boy by Roald Dahl, five boys play a trick on the owner of a candy shop. The owner, Mrs. Pratchett, is an old and nasty woman. She sells candy to the neighborhood children with her gross, dirty hands. She is always mean to the boys. One day, while at school, the boys find a dead mouse. This leads to “The Great Mouse Plot.”

The great mouse plot involved putting a dead mouse in a jar of gobstoppers. When Mrs. Pratchett found the mouse, she was very upset. She knew the criminals must have come from the Cathedral school. She turned to Mr.Coombs for assistance. She and Mr. Coombs walked down aisles of boys finding the culprits. Roald and his friends must have been scared because they were afraid to be found out. They know they are going to get into trouble but they don’t know what that means. They find out quickly. Mr. Coombs takes a cane to each boy’s bottom. This is horrid. The thought of any educator beating a small child seems criminal. This would never happen in Utah today. Teachers and administrators handle discipline differently now. Interestingly, Mr. Coombs and Mama handle the situation very differently.



October 3, 2014
Reading Day

Writing Prompt:
Please discuss the use of corporal punishment as a means of disciplining students. Think of how Roald Dahl was canned in "The Great Mouse Plot" story. 
Reading Day.

October 2, 2014
Learning Target: Today I will read Mr. Coombs and Mrs. Pratchett's revenge. I will discuss unfamiliar words and unfamiliar content. I will analyze the use of corporal punishment. 


October 1, 2014
Learning Target: Today I will read chapters 3 and 4 in Boy. I will find a section that has a strong description. I will find 5 descriptive sentences and share them with a classmate. I will then show mastery as I write my own description. This description must have 8 sentences. 

Writing Prompt:
Imagine that you are in your bedroom. Look in one corner. Describe that one corner. Use descriptive language (describe colors, textures, sounds, smells) to describe this spot.  Write at least 8 complete sentences.  

Read chapters 3 and 4 in Boy. 

Revisit your own descriptive paragraph. Rewrite it and all more details. Imagine that you are painting a picture with words. Share your writing with a classmate. 

September 29/30 

Writing Prompt 24
Why spelling and punctuation are important. 

Thanks to the rock star hoe hand that Ditched this ditch, I get to seat on swamp mates and pull all his scag out of the tree's and back on the right away.....

Lawrence Webster's photo.
Lawrence Webster's photo.
Lawrence Webster's photo.
Lawrence Webster's photo.
Lawrence Webster's photo.

Do you understand what the writer is trying to explain? Do the pictures help? Can you rewrite this so that other readers will understand what is happening?

We will then listen and read chapter 1 and chapter 2  "Starting Point" in Boy by Roald Dahl (audio tracks 1-4).
    
  • What is an Autobiography?

  • Where was the hometown of the family?

  • What was set up in Bute Street, Cardiff?

  • How old was Roald Dahl in 1918?

  • Who died from appendicitis?

  • Summarize the main events of the section.

    Enduring Questions

    • How personal experiences help to shape the person you are

    • Identifying culture and the role it plays in our lives

    • Facing challenges and taking responsibility

    • Developing relationships and showing growth



September 26, 2014
Writing Prompt 23
If you were absent, write for five minutes about what you were doing today. 

Article of the Week (a few days early)

The Learning Myth Article of the Week Due October 8/9  Check AofW assignment steps above. 
Vocabulary
Inevitably
Verbalizing
Persevered
Neural
Mindsets
Correlated
Maleable
Innocuous
Implications
Embrace



September 25, 2014
Writing Prompt 22
Free Write

Finish reading George's Marvelous Medicine

September 24, 2014
Writing Prompt 21
If you were George, what would/should you do?

George's Marvelous Medicine by Roald Dahl

September 22/23,2014
Writing Prompt 20
"People will never know how far a little kindness can go." Rachel Joy Scott

Vocabulary Test #3

Introduction to Roald Dahl's writing:

George's Marvelous Medicine by Roald Dahl

September 19, 2014
Writing Prompt 19
Always remember you are absolutely unique. Just like everyone else.  Margaret Mead

Finish Close Read assignment for Arachne. If you didn't finish this in class, you need to finish it over the weekend and turn it in on Monday. 

September 18, 2014
Writing Prompt 18
"History is written by winners." Alex Haley
What do you think this quote means? Do you agree or disagree? How would history books be different if they were written by the losers? Make sure you use the quote in your response. 

Assignment:  "Arachne"

Define:
obscure
indignantly
obstinacy
descendants

1.  Explain why Arachne is so indignant? (Begin at Arachne was used to being wondered at...)
2. Restate Arachne's response to the women's advice. (Begin at "One day when Arachne turned round with such words...)
3. Describe Arachne's reaction when she finds out she's speaking to Athene.
4. What does the old woman's advice suggest about the theme?
5. What was the insult Arachne wove into the cloth?
5. What happens to Arachne at the end of the myth?
Short response:
What lessons about human behavior does this myth teach? Review your reading notes and be sure to cite textual evidence from the myth in your response. 

September 17, 2014
Writing Prompt 17
"If all printers were determined not to print anything until they were sure it would offend nobody, ther would be very little ever printed." Benjamin Franklin
Ideas:
Censorship
Free Speech
Social Media
Bullying
Freedom of the Press
Opinion Pieces or Editorials
Other ideas?

Assignment:  Today you will revisit Rikki Tikki Tavi with a political perspective. Write a piece where you decide who the cobras and other snakes represent, who the mongoose represents, and how these fit in with British Imperialism and Indian Independence. Use textual evidence to support your answer. Please write approximately one page or at least three full paragraphs. 

When you finish your response, please read quietly. You should bring a book on Wednesdays for silent reading. 

September 15/16, 2014
Writing Prompt 16
"One generation plants a tree, another gets the shade." Chinese Proverb
How does this proverb relate to the way an earlier generation created good and bad situations for your generation?

Finish reading Riki-Tiki-Tavi.


September 12, 2014
Writing Prompt

What natural enemies in the animal kingdom can you name? Think of common enemies such as birds and cats. Create a list with as many as you can think of. 

Today we are going to start the short story "Rikki-tikki-tavi" by Rudyard Kipling. 

National Geographic video about cobra vs. mongoose





September 11, 2014
Grade make up day

September 10, 2014

Writing Prompt
"Cut back on your possessions. The more you won, the more time you waste taking care of things."  The Delany Sisters
Decide what you think about the recommendation above, and then argue the opposite position. 


Thayer uses some long and sometimes difficult words to refer to things that have common names, such as spheroid for ball and stricken multitude for anxious crowd. Why do you think Thayer used these words instead of more common words?

Assignment:
Create a chart on one side of the paper:

Beginning            Middle             End

Decide which stanzas of the poem belong under each heading. 

On the other side of the paper:
Make a plot structure map
Think back to plot structure of a short story (August 28, 2014). Identify the setting, rising action, climax, falling action, and finally resolution of the story. 

September 8/9, 2014
Writing Prompt 

Write about a day you'd like to forget.


Finish reading "A Crush" on pages 15-22 in blue literature book. 
  • This story is written with an omniscient narrator. This means that the narrator knows everything.
  • Find an example of an simile and an example of a metaphor in the story. Remember, simile uses like or as to describe two different objects or ideas.
  • Identify who is a dynamic character in the story and who is a static character in the story.
Answer questions 1-4 on page 24.

September 5, 2014
Vocabulary Test #1

"A Crush" pages 15-22 in blue literature book. 


September 4, 2014

Writing Prompt #10

Think of your best day in school. What happened that makes this day stand out in your memory? 
Write a story for a friend that tells about what happened on this day in school. Please have at least 3 descriptive details in your story. 

Vocabulary test practice
Review words and definitions from August 29, 2014



September 3, 2014

Writing Prompt #9
I have never been more frightened than when....

Today we are going to the library orientation during class. 


September 2, 2014

Writing Prompt: If and when I raise children, I'll never...

Article of the Week
Bottle Water Text Set  Read the article in class and get the article's gist (read for an overview). 

Key Vocabulary
  • environment
  • biodegrade
  • toxic
  • inferior
  • recycle
  • incinerate
  • petroleum
  • vilified
  • contaminants
  • scrutiny

L 7.2a  Use a comma to separate coordinate adjectives (e.g., It was a fascinating, enjoyable movie but not He wore an old[,] green shirt).

Which sentences need commas between coordinate adjectives?

  1. In the attic we found old thin paper cutouts we used to play with when we were children.
  2. The poster depicted a brown-haired blue-eyed child wearing a red denim shirt.
  3. For breakfast we ate two oversized blueberry muffins.
  4. We bought two dozen boxes of mouth-watering peanut butter Girl Scout cookies.

ANSWERS

  1. In the attic we found old, thin paper cutouts we used to play with when we were children.
  2. The poster depicted a brown-haired, blue-eyed child wearing a red denim shirt.
  3. For breakfast we ate two oversized blueberry muffins.(no commas)
  4. We bought two dozen boxes of mouth-watering peanut butter Girl Scout cookies. (no commas)

August 29, 2014
Today I will create a plot structure map and identify exposition and key rising actions. I will find at least three rising actions. See yesterday's lesson.

Writing Prompt:  Finish the thought: If I could change one thing about myself....
If you can't think of anything, please explain how you got to be so perfect :).  

Vocabulary Quiz
Be sure you can define the following:

Vocabulary List #1

1. activists:  those who brings about political or social change
2. authoritarian : 
showing a lack of concern for the 
wishes or opinions of others; domineering; 
dictatorial
3. catalyst :  
a person or thing that precipitates an 
event or change
4. diverse :
showing a great deal of variety; very 
different
5. humiliates : 
make (someone) feel ashamed 
and foolish by injuring their dignity and self-
respect, esp. publicly
6. hypothesized : to make a proposed explanation made on the basis of limited evidence as a starting point for further investigation
7. influence : the capacity to have an effect on the character, development, or behavior of someone or something
8. intrinsic : belonging naturally; essential
9. millennial : 
a member of Generation Y (born in 
the 1980s and 1990s)
10. prejudice : 
preconceived opinion that is not 
based on reason or actual experience




August 28, 2014

Writing Prompt: Write about the best or the worst day of your life. Please write one full page. 

Short Story Unit
We will begin the short story unit by reading "Charles full text" by Shirley Jackson.

Expositionthe part of a play or work of fiction in which the background to the main conflict is introduced.
Rising ActionThe rising action of a story is the series of events that begin immediately after the exposition (introduction) of the story and builds up to the climax. These events are generally the most important parts of the story since the entire plot depends on them to set up the climax, and ultimately the satisfactory resolution of the story itself.
Climax: The climax is the turning point, which changes the protagonist’s fate.
Falling Action: During the falling action, the conflict between the protagonist and the antagonist unravels, with the protagonist winning or losing against the antagonist. The falling action may contain a moment of final suspense, in which the final outcome of the conflict is in doubt.
Resolution: Comprises events from the end of the falling action to the actual ending scene of the drama or narrative.

Protagonist :The main character (usually thought to be the good guy)
Antagonist: A person or a group of people who oppose the main character(s).
False protagonistA false protagonist is presented at the start of the fictional work as the main character, but then is eradicated, often by killing them (usually for shock value or as a plot twist) or changed in terms of their role in the story (i.e. making them a lesser character, a character who leaves the story, or revealing them to actually be the antagonist).

Homework: Independent reading

August 27, 2014
Today I will continue working on a close read. I will use the definitions I found to make meaning. I will identify the author's claim and three pieces of evidence that support the claim. 

Individually, continue to read and annotate the article of the week. 


August 25 / 26, 2014
Today I will identify an author's claim and the evidence the author uses to support their claim. I will read, define, annotate, and make close reading notes. I will know I got it when I find the claim and three pieces of evidence that support the claim. 

We will continue to read the Article of the Week for meaning and understanding. You should show detailed annotation (remember, you are having a conversation with the article) on the article. 

Finished close read is due on September 2.
Reading log is due on September 2 also.
Vocabulary test will be given on September 5.


How books can help good kids turn into great adults


  • Please read the article one time all of the way through so you know what it is talking about. 
  • Read it a second time finding words you are not sure about, find the definition for those words. 
  • Find the author's claim.
  • Look for three pieces of evidence (proof) that the author uses.
  • Make notes in the margins explaining why you think the author said what they said. 
I will show you how to do this during class
After I model this you will work in pairs reading closely and annotating as you go. 


Homework: Define all ten bolded words in the article. Have those ready for class tomorrow. 


August 22, 2014
Today I will speak to a group using a clear voice, making eye contact, and staying on topic. 

Bring 5 items that you think tell a story about yourself. Be prepared to describe each item and tell why it also describes you. Remember, do not bring weapons or even toy weapons.  



August 21, 2014
Today I will brainstorm all about me. I will write a one sentence description about one object (concrete detail) and then two sentences telling how that object relates to me. 

Think of an object that you think describes you. 
Write ONE sentence describing that object. 
    Example:  Sitting on the table is a old fashioned school bell, black and heavy, with a wooden handle. 
Next write two sentences explaining how that item describes something about you. 
    I am older than many teachers and kind of old fashioned. I can sit quietly at my desk but I can also be very loud. 
    This is a lot like me. I am older, I like to sit quietly at my desk, but when I need to get everyone's attention, I sure can be loud. 

All About Me assignment:  On Friday, bring 5 items that you think tell a story about yourself. Be prepared to describe the item and tell why it also describes you. 


August 20, 2014

Make sure to read the class disclosure document yourself and with your parents. Signed forms are due back by Friday
Pay careful attention to the late work policy, hall passes, and google.doc information. 

All homework assignments are turned in at the beginning of class in your class specific file at the back of the room. Late work is turned in at the purple basket at the front of the classroom. 











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Vocabulary practice website

May 30, 2014
Last Day of School, no classes. 

May 29, 2014
Yearbook Day

May 28, 2014
Dear New 7th Grader,
If you are reading this letter it must mean that you are in Mrs. Harrison's English class. Three things that you should know are...
If you want to learn you must...
If I could do it over again, I would...


May 27, 2014
Book reflection
Chapter Twenty-two: If you need to borrow words, Arnold Lobel wrote some good 
ones. 
 
1. What do you think Catherine will tell Melissa about her summer when she returns? 
2. Why does Catherine come to the realization that David needs to use his own words? 
3. In what ways has Catherine’s relationship with David changed? Why do you think 
this is so? How is the relationship better?


May 23, 2014
Awards program at Timpview High School.

Rules 
A real conversation takes 
two people. (p.191) 
Catherine waits on the dance floor until Jason 
arrives. They talk about why Catherine did not want to 
tell her friends about him. Once Kristi and Ryan meet 
Jason, they dance in the middle of the floor. 

If you need to borrow words, Arnold Lobel wrote some good 
ones. (p.198)
Before going to bed, Catherine reflects about her 
summer and about her relationship with David. He has placed toys in 
the fish tank again. She is happy they can exchange quotes from 
Frog and Toad Together.
.


May 22, 2014
7th grade Classic Skate party. 

May 21, 2014
Today we will attend a presentation from the Provo Library about their summer reading program. 

Rules  Some people think they know who you are, when 
really they don’t. (p.178) 
On the way home, Catherine and her mother speak about 
the incident at the party. When they arrive home, 
Catherine stays to baby sit David, and decides to attend 
the dance with Jason. Her father takes her to the dance. 

Late doesn’t mean not coming. ( p.186) 
 
Catherine’s father takes her to the dance. David goes 
with them. There is a festive environment. While the 
father speaks to people, Catherine and David make 
and share wishes. 

Chapter rewrite due today. Chose one conflict and rewrite it from the perspective of another character (you may use Mom, Dad, Kristi, Ryan, David, Jason, Mrs. Moorehouse, Speech Therapist).



May 19/20, 2014
Rules pages 145-
Solving one problem can create another. (p.145) 
Jason gets a motorized chair. Catherine and Jason 
go for a walk to the beach. They run into Kristi, but she 
doesn’t see them. Before going back to the clinic, 
Jason invites Catherine to his birthday party, which 
will be on Saturday.

No dancing unless I’m alone in my room, or it’s 
pitch-black dark. (p.155 ) 
Kristi goes to Catherine’s house to make posters for 
the dance. Kristi motivates David to dance and 
Catherine stops him. Catherine and Kristi argue 
and finish their work in silence. 

Not everything worth keeping has to be useful. (p. 162) 
Catherine buys a guitar for Jason and hides it 
in the car. At the clinic, Jason asks Catherine to 
invite David and Kristi to his party. When Catherine 
shows him a card she made with them on a bench 
without the wheel chair, he gets upset.

Pantless brothers are not my problem. (p. 167) 
Catherine and David go to Jason’s party. They spend 
time together and Jason asks her if she wants to go to the 
dance with him. He thinks she is embarrassed to be 
seen with him. She leaves the party upset because 
Jason told her that her no dancinrule was an excuse.

Due May 21
Chapter rewrite. Chose one conflict and rewrite it from the perspective of another character (you may use Mom, Dad, Kristi, Ryan, David, Jason, Mrs. Moorehouse, Speech Therapist).

May 16, 2014
Vocabulary Test 25--This is the last test this school year!

May 15, 2014
Today I will review conflict, both for an entire story and for small sections. I will choose one conflict and rewrite it from the perspective of an alternate character. 

Rules pages 124-154

Chapter Thirteen: Sometimes people don’t answer because they didn’t hear you. 
Other times it’s because they don’t want to hear you. 
 
1. Why does Catherine run up her driveway, even though she is tired of running? 
2. What words would you use to describe the feeling you get from running? 
3. Why is Catherine jealous of her father’s tomatoes? Explain whether or not her 
jealousy is justified. 
4. What does Catherine so desperately want from her father? 
 
Chapter Fourteen: No toys in the fish tank. 
 
1. Kristi calls Catherine to hang out. What do they decide to do? 
2. Catherine takes awhile to decide what to wear. Why do you think this is so? 
3. When Kristi arrives, she asks Catherine to get her a towel. What strange thing does 
Kristi notice when they enter Catherine’s house? Why does Catherine ignore it? 
4. Do you think Kristi will like the pond? Why or why not? 
5. Why does Catherine believe she was Kristi’s second choice? Do you think Catherine 
is correct in her assumption? 
6. When Kristi begins to share her feelings about her parents’ separation, why does 
Catherine decide not to share her same feelings about being pulled between two 
worlds of her own? 
7. Catherine and Kristi swim out to the raft. Catherine says, “This is what I wished for 
– a next-door friend I could just come and go with.” Do you think Catherine got her 
wish with a friend like Kristi? Explain. 
8. What other wish does Catherine want? 
9. Who interrupts Catherine and Kristi’s time together? 
10. Ryan reminds Kristi to ask Catherine a question. What does Kristi want Catherine to 
do? 11. Why do you think Catherine will not follow through with the request? What do you 
think she should do? 
12. At the end of the chapter, Catherine writes words to describe her day, but all that 
come to mind are: ‘guilty’, ‘complicated’, ‘hidden’ and ‘weak’. Why? 
 
Chapter Fifteen: Solving one problem can create another. 
 
1. What did Jason’s parents buy him as a birthday gift? Why might this be a good gift 
for Jason? 
2. In what ways has Jason changed since he met Catherine? 
3. Jason wants to take a walk. Where does he ask Catherine to go with him? Why is 
Catherine uneasy on their walk? How would you feel? 
4. Why does Catherine pretend she does not see Kristi? 
5. What do you think Jason means when he tells Catherine she is pretty? Is he being 
nice or telling her he likes her? 
6. Jason invites Catherine to his birthday party. Why is it on a “good day” for 
Catherine?

Assignment: Rewrite one conflict or major event in the book from the perspective of a minor character. This assignment is due on Wednesday, May 21. Please type if possible. 

May 14, 2014
Today I will revisit my summary assessment. IF I did not earn a 3 or 4 on the assessment, I will review and redo in order to show mastery. 
Vocabulary test 25 on Friday. 

antibiotic
biopsy
biosphere
devitalize
microbe
revive
symbiosis
viable
vitality
vivid


May 12/13, 2014
"Arachne" 
Show evidence of a close read. 
Define: obscure, indignantly, obstinacy, strive.

Assessment:
Describe the SETTING of the story.
Who is the PROTAGONIST in the story. Use textual evidence to defend your position.
Who is the ANTAGONIST in the story. Use textual evidence to defend your position.
Summarize the story with at least five details. Use complete sentences in your response. 

May 9, 2014
Vocabulary Test 24
Vocabulary Exercises lesson 25

May 8, 2014
Vocabulary lesson 24 review (test tomorrow)
Rules chapters 9-11.

Chapter Nine: At someone else’s house, you have to follow their rules. 
 
1. Compare and contrast life at Catherine’s house with life at Kristi’s house. Which 
lifestyle does Catherine prefer? Why? 
2. Why does Catherine feel she has to watch what she says around Kristi? 
3. When Kristi suggests Catherine take Jason to a dance, Catherine changes the subject. 
Why doesn’t Catherine want to reveal information about Jason? 
4. In this chapter, we learn that Kristi’s parents are separated. How does Kristi feel 
about her parent’s situation? How do you know? 
5. Catherine returns home happy, but her, “happiness deflates like a balloon with the 
smallest tear”. What changes her mood? 
6. What gift did Jason send to Catherine? 
7. Predict what Catherine will do to “make it up to Jason”. 
 
Chapter Ten: If it fits in your mouth, it’s food. 
 
1. What does Catherine do to mend her relationship with Jason? 
2. How does Jason feel about her surprise? How do you know? 
3. Catherine also makes Jason more cards. In what ways are the new cards helping 
Jason? 
4. Why does Catherine want to make Jason more words? Explain. 
5. What do Catherine’s actions in this chapter signify about her character? 
 
Chapter Eleven: Sometimes people laugh when they like you. But sometimes they 
laugh to hurt you. 
 
1. Why does Mom buy Catherine the colored pencils she has been wanting? 
2. As Mom, Catherine and David approach home, they spot Kristi and Ryan playing 
basketball. What is Catherine’s dilemma? What choice should she make? 
3. What does Ryan do to create conflict? 
4. If you were Kristi, what would you have done? Catherine? 5. What does Catherine imagine Ryan and Kristi talk about after David is brought 
inside? How does Catherine feel? 
6. Catherine compares David to an apple, “red perfect on the outside, but mushy 
brown at the first bite”. Explain what Catherine means by this comparison. 
7. Describe the ways Catherine uses her sketchbook to express her feelings. 
8. At the end of the chapter, Catherine asks David, “Who are you?” Why do you 
suppose she asks this question of her brother?

May 7, 2014
Rules  chapters 7 & 8 pages 66-88
Read each chapter and then answer the following questions. Be ready to defend your answers in a class discussion

Chapter Seven: Saying you’ll do something means you have to do it – unless you 
have a very good excuse. 
 
1. Why does Catherine get uneasy when Jason refers to her as a friend on his 
communication board? 
2. As Catherine shares the new words for Jason’s communication board, they begin to 
“talk”. What things do Jason and Catherine have in common? 
3. What does Catherine volunteer to do for Jason on page 74? 
4. At the end of the chapter, Catherine adds a new rule to her collection: “Some 
people think they know who you are, when really they don’t”. Why did she make up 
this rule?  

Chapter Eight: If you can only choose one, pick carefully. 
 
1. As Catherine waits for her new neighbor to arrive next door, she busies herself by 
making cards for Jason. Where does she get the inspiration for creating the cards? 
2. Why is babysitting David sometimes a hard job for Catherine? 
3. Kristi and Catherine finally meet. Describe Kristi. Why do you think Catherine 
assumes she will be popular? Why does Catherine also assume Kristi would not like 
to play with flashlights and practice Morse-code? 
4. Why are Kristi and Catherine’s views of Ryan different? 
5. In what ways does David almost “ruin” Catherine’s visit with Kristi? 
6. What does Kristi say that upsets Catherine on page 84? How would you have reacted 
to Kristi’s statement about David? 
7. Catherine makes a choice to watch television with Kristi rather than go to 
occupational therapy. What do you think of her choice? What might be the 
consequences of her choice?



May 5/6, 2014
RL 7.4  Today I will discuss the power of words. I will consider word choice and how speaking and writing are strengthened by words. I will choose words that I would give Jason and explain my word choices. 

Vocabulary Lesson 24 exercises (pages 155-157)
The Roots -flect- and -flu-
affluent
deflect
flex
fluctuate
fluid
flume
inflexible
influential
influx
reflex

Rules pages 41-55
After reading this section, you will create 8 word cards that you might add to Jason's communication book. Each word card must have an illustration so that Jason can visualize the word. 


May 2, 2014

YouTube Video


How can our own understanding change our perspective? 

Rules pages 22-40
Chapter Two: Don’t run down the clinic hallway. 
 
1. List two reasons that Catherine enjoys going to occupational therapy with her 
mother. 
2. Name one person with whom you enjoy spending quality time. Describe your 
fondest memory. Why is this time alone so special to you? 
3. Who is Jason? Describe him. 
4. List two reasons why Catherine decides to draw Jason. 
5. In what ways does drawing help Catherine? What activities do you like to do in your 
spare time? 
6. Why is Jason “fighting mad”? 7. Why does Mrs. Morehouse scold Catherine? Explain whether you agree or disagree 
with the way she spoke to Catherine. 
8. Catherine thinks that an invisible cloak would be useful to her in the waiting room. 
Why? Describe a time when you wished you were invisible. 
9. What is a “communication book”? How does Catherine wish to change it? 
10. Catherine also wishes that Mrs. Morehouse would buy Jason a guitar. Why do you 
think Jason wants a guitar so badly? 
11. Catherine would like to apologize to Jason for possibly hurting his feelings. Why 
does she hesitate? 
12. How does Catherine make peace with Jason at the end of the chapter? 
 
Chapter Three: If it’s too loud, cover your ears or ask the other person to be quiet. 
 
1. What types of noises bother David? Why? 
2. Why did Catherine get into a fight with Ryan at the bus stop on the last day of 
school? How would you have handled the same situation? 
3. Describe a time when a laugh hurt your feelings. 
4. Catherine’s says, “Mom doesn’t understand how not everyone is on David’s side.” 
What might it mean to be “on David’s side”? Why wouldn’t people be “on his side”? 
What would you do to show David your friendship? 
5. Mom wants Catherine to join in community summer activities. What sort of 
activities do you find interesting in the summer? 
6. In what ways have Catherine’s parents altered their lives to better support David? 
What do you think of their sacrifices? 
7. How does David embarrass Catherine in front of her new neighbor? 
8. What does Catherine do to comfort David? 
9. When her father finally arrives, he is 42 minutes late for David. Catherine turns 
down the invitation to the video store. Imagine you were Catherine watching David 
while waiting for Dad to arrive. Write a letter to Dad explaining your thoughts and 
feelings. 



May 1, 2014
I will use chapter headings as a reading strategy.
Create a list of 10 rules that you want to live by. 
As we begin reading Rules by Cynthia Lord, we notice that each chapter title is a rule. Catherine tried to create order in her life by giving her brother David common sense rules. This was problematic because David, and 8 year old boy with Autism, was not able to read social cues. 
Today we will read pages 1-22.


Chapter One: Follow the rules. 
 
1. Why is the start of summer vacation disappointing to the narrator? 
2. Where does the narrator have to go? Why? 
3. What is David’s relationship to the narrator? 
4. The narrator says David loves to go to the video store, but, “…the hardest part is 
when David kneels in the aisle to see the back of a video box a complete stranger is 
holding in his hand”. Why do you think that is “the hardest part” of the visit to the 
store? 
5. Why do the narrator’s hands tremble when she tries to get David to walk to the car? 
6. Why does the narrator lie to David about the time her father will pick him up? What 
would you have done in the same situation? 
7. The narrator says that one of her favorite rules is: “Sometimes you’ve gotta work 
with what you’ve got.” Describe a time when this rule applied to your life. 
8. How does the narrator feel about the prospect of a twelve year old girl moving into 
her neighbor, Mrs. Bowman’s house? What is she hoping will happen? 
9. What does friendship mean to you? What does it mean to the narrator? 
10. In what ways will a next door friend change the narrator’s life? 
11. How does David stand in the way of what Catherine wants for herself? 
12. Her mother seems to think that real friends would accept David. Explain your 
opinion. 
13. In this chapter, we find out that David has autism. We also discover that he loves 
rules. The narrator has plenty of rules for him. Why might rules be helpful to David? 
Why might the narrator want to create these rules for him? How might Catherine’s 
rules hold David back? 
14. At the end of the chapter, we discover the narrator’s name is Catherine. If you had to 
choose one rule Catherine invented for her brother in this chapter, which one do you 
think would be most important for David to understand? Explain.

April 28-April 30
SAGE Testing Reading

April 23, 2014
  • Sherlock and John investigate the ghosts of a young man who has been seeing monstrous hounds out in the woods where his father died.
Protagonist--the leading character or one of the major characters in a drama, movie, novel, or other fictional text.
Antagonist--a person who actively opposes or is hostile to someone or something; an adversary.



April 21/22, 2014

The Hounds of the Baskervilles video 1939
The Hound Of The Baskervilles

The most celebrated tale of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s canon, ‘The Hound of the Baskervilles’ is set in the Victorian Age and was originally released by Twentieth Century-Fox in 1939. It is the first of fourteen Sherlock Holmes films starring Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce.

When Sir Charles Baskerville is killed outside of Baskerville Hall, his good friend Dr. Mortimer (Lionel Atwill) fears that the curse of the Baskervilles has struck once again. Mortimer enlists the help of Sherlock Holmes (Basil Rathbone), before yet another Baskerville can succumb to the evil legend.

Sir Henry Baskerville (Richard Greene) arrives in London to claim his inheritance. Mortimer takes Sir Henry to 221b Baker Street and expresses his fear for Sir Henry’s life. Baskerville soon learns that along with the grand mansion on the moor, comes a devilish curse, a curious butler (John Carradine) and a cast of bizarre neighbors.

Holmes, pressed with "other business," sends Dr. Watson (Nigel Bruce) to accompany Sir Henry to the dreary moor to protect the young Baskerville from the legend of the wicked hound. Of course, with danger afoot, Sherlock Holmes may not be so far from the scene as is assumed.

April 18, 2014

"The Hounds of the Baskervilles" continued


April 17, 2014
Mysterious Circumstances

"The Hound of the Baskervilles" by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle pages 608-654

Compare Dr. Watson modern to Dr. Watson in this play. 



April 16, 2014

Orange vocabulary book---yellow list Lesson 23

All vocabulary exercises for lesson 23 (pages 149-152).  

Extended writing exercise as well as the other exercises. 

Extended writing exercise: At least three paragraphs long, use at least three words from the vocabulary list.



April 14/15
DRP testing



March 31, April 1-4
SAGE Testing


March 25/26, 2014
Peer Response:
Identify the author's claim.
What are their three supporting arguments for their claim?
What is their counter-claim?
Did they offer a rebuttal?
What did you find confusing?
What was well done?

Good, Bad, or Ugly?







Many objects and events draw mixed reviews. Be it a poem, or an office building, chances are some people will like it and some people won't. As you learned in writing your critical review, it's not enough to simply like or hate something, you need to be prepared to explain why you think as you do. Answering the questions below can help you select relevant information to support your opinion. 
  • Reasons you like or dislike each building
    • evidence to support your claim
  • Are the reasons sensible and based on fact?
    • Do the facts come from reliable sources?
  • How do my opinions compare to other student's opinions?
    • How can I use my own experiences to support my opinion?
Think of another object or event that draws mixed reviews. Discuss with a classmate this object or event. Share your opinion and provide support (evidence). 

How does the idea of a pretty or ugly building relate to perception of humans? Think of your poster that you are making. Remember, the poster is due on April 3. 

Vocabulary Exercise Lesson 15
Comprehension
Complete the Sentence
Write the Correct Word


March 21, 2014
Write a six paragraph essay addressing the question, "Was it correct to evacuate women and children first from the Titanic?" 
1st paragraph--introduction, ending with a claim
2nd, 3rd, 4th paragraphs---defend your claim
5th paragraph--counter-claim with a rebuttal
6th paragraph--tie all of the lose ends together. 

Each paragraph should be about 8 sentences long.
Remember to capitalize all proper nouns (Titanic) and the first word of sentences.
DO NOT use the word I, such as I think, I believe, I know. 



March 19 and 20, 2014
Exploring the Titanic



"From Exploring the Titanic" by Robert D. Ballard pages 577-589

QuickWrites page 591

Excerpts from "A Night to Remember" movie

March 17/18, 2014
  • What is willpower?
  • What are your favorite foods?
    • How much self control do you have when it comes to resisting these foods?
  • If you could eat anything, what would it be?
    • What if you could have all of it that you wanted? Would you eat until you got sick?
Read Cultural Connection on page 566. 
Read "Active Reading" on page 566
SQ3R
  • Survey
  • Question
    • Write three questions as you read
    • Predict what is going to happen in the story
  • Read
    • Look for answers to your questions as you read
    • Answer the questions at the beginning, middle, and end of the story
    • Slow down your reading as you get to harder sections.
    • Reread if you don't understand the first time
  • Recite
    • What did you just read?
    • Tell someone else what your questions were
    • Tell someone else what you predicted
    • Tell someone else what the story was about
    • Tell someone else how your questions were answered
"Lose Now, Pay Later" pages 567-572
  • What are the current social values that this story addresses? 
  • How does this story point back to the two Dove advertisements we watched last week?
Quickwrites:
1. Assume Trevor's idea about aliens is not correct. Write a new ending explaining Swoodies and Slimmers. (At least half a page)
2. Assume Trevor's idea about aliens is correct. Create a plan on how the aliens will use the fat from Slimmers to harvest energy. (At least half a page)
3. Create an advertisement for Swoodies and Slimmers. Draw this on the back of your responses. 


March 14, 2014
Vocabulary test 14

"The Way It Is"  by Gloria Oden
"Without Commercials" by Alice Walker

Collage Assignment
Create your collage on 11x14 paper
  • "Celebrate Yourself"  Due April 3
  • You may include a picture of yourself
  • Use at least 10 pictures that show who you are.
    • These may include what you like to do, what you wish you could do, your favorite colors, books you like to read, things you like to do, anything else that tells the "reader" about you. 


March 13, 2014
Reading Logs are due today!
"The Revolt of the Evil Fairies" pages 551-556
  • As you read this story, pay attention to the role that race and skin color play in Hopkinsville. 
  • Why can't the narrator be Prince Charming in the play?
  • Which students get the best roles?
  • How does the fight begin?
  • Why doesn't the narrator care about never being in the play again?
  • How does this story compare to Watsons?
In pairs, list the conflicts the narrator faces and classify them as internal or external conflicts. Be ready to justify your classification.


March 12, 2014

Vocabulary 14 exercises
Derivatives
Find the example
  • Turn your exercises in today. 

Comprehension check for Monday/Tuesday's story
1. What is a dragonrider?
2. What does Beterli taunt Keevan about?
3. Why is Beterli eliminated from the impression?
4. What magic powers do dragons have that they probably use in choosing their dragonriders?
5. What kind of dragon chooses Keevan?

Read "No-Wall -- Wall" poem
I have passed 
this wall
a thousand times--and more.
It is high/smooth/insurmountable.
To me
it is a wall.

But here comes 
a boy.
To him it is
a challenge.
What my eye
indifferently saw as
a drain--hole
is opportunity to him--
the means to greater heights.

A run!
A launch!
Sneaker toe
finds firm hold.
He's half way!
He's up and over!

And I am glad
to learn 
that walls are challenges
to some
as I walk around the wall.

  • If you built a wall around your house, how would you feel if somebody climbed over it?
  • What challenge did Keegan face? How was that challenge similar to a wall?
  • What kind of challenges have you faced? Did you confront them directly or did you find another way around them?

March 10/11, 2014

Vocabulary Exercises Lesson 14
Comprehension

How do you view yourself? How do others view you? 
Today we will begin by viewing a couple of ads put out by Dove cosmetics. 
Dove Evolution Ad

YouTube Video


  • Discuss how society expects women to be perfect.

  • Why can’t we just be happy with being beautiful women without trying to make them into something they are not.



  • Why do the women view themselves differently than an outside observer views them?

  • Allow students to discuss as a class these two video, comparing the Evolution and Real Beauty Sketches.


“The Smallest Dragonboy” pages 533-546 blue literature book.

Quick Writes (1-4) on page 548.


Discussion

  • What do you think is the main reason that Heath choose Keevan to be his dragonrider?

  • What do you think Heath might have done if Keevan hadn’t been present at the Hatching Ground?



March 7, 2014
Watsons Go to Birmingham--1963 movie
Response: Why do the producers show more of the Civil Rights Movement in the movie than the book addresses? Write at least a half page response. 

Students who are missing key assignments will work in the hall until they have completed their assignments. When the assignments are done, they will be allowed to watch the movie. 

March 6, 2014    
Watsons Go to Birmingham--1963

Chapter 15
In Chapter 15 we find the Watsons back in Flint. The family is extremely concerned about 
Kenny’s state of mind. He has been disappearing for longer and longer periods of time behind 
the couch in the World-Famous Watson Pet Hospital. He was trying to come to terms with his 
experiences in Birmingham. As the weeks pass Byron finally succeeds in getting Kenny to face 
his problems by helping Kenny realize that he must reach inside of himself to find his inner 
strength and courage. Kenny learns that there is strength in all of us that gives us the courage 
to cope with even the most insurmountable obstacles in our lives.

Writing response: Kenny responds by retreating. Please rewrite the last chapter of the book. Use how, where, why, when vocabulary in your response. Write at least a one page response. 

March 5, 2014

Article of the Week Are Kids Too Coddled?
Find the meaning of the ten words listed at the back of the packet. 
Identify the author's claim.
Find three arguments that the author states. 
Identify one counter-claim that the author states.
Do you agree or disagree with the author's claim? Avoid using I think or I agree until you have introduced your idea. 


March 3/4, 2014

Sage test practice
www.sageportal.org
go to student/family 
click on practice test (twice) 
login as a guest
identify grade level

These practice tests can be done at home too. 

Overview of Chapter 14   Pages 180-190
In Chapter 14 a bomb explodes in the church where Joetta was attending Sunday School. 
Kenny goes into the church and finds a shoe that he believes is Joetta’s and then assumes that 
she is dead. In another imaginary struggle with the Wool Pooh, he somehow manages to gain 
the shoe and then returns home to Grandma Sands’ house in a daze. Joetta arrives home a little 
later asking him where he went so fast. When he looks confused she explains that she left the 
church when he waved at her and chased him down the street! When Kenny finally looks at 
her he sees that she has both of her shoes. Confused, but understanding that Joetta is fine, he 
leaves the house to find his parents.

• How does the author describe the scene at the church, after it has been bombed?
• Why do you think Kenny sees the Wool Pooh in the church after it has been bombed?
• Why does Joetta think that Kenny has changed his clothes?

February 28, 2014
Vocabulary Lesson 13 Test
Vocabulary Lesson 14--Write the correct word, complete the sentence.
Independent reading for the remainder of the class. 

Vocabulary Lesson 14
applicable
expedient
extraneous
functional
futile
obsolete
opportune
pragmatic
relevant
utilitarian

February 27, 2014
Finish discussing "I Have a Dream" speech. 
Write a three paragraph response. 
First paragraph outlining Dr. King's Dream.
Second and third paragraphs, describe your own dream for your children 20 years from now. Include two alliterations, one series of repetition. 


February 26, 2014
In August, 1963, Martin Luther King Jr. stood and spoke to over 250,000 Civil Rights supporters. 
Video

YouTube Video


Some rhetorical tools King used in this speech:
Allusion--referencing something else---100 years ago and still not free---emancipation proclamation happened in 1863
Alliteration: repeating a consonant sound--
Repetition: I have a dream
Pathos: an appeal to the audiences emotions

Writing response: This speech identifies the goals of the Civil Rights Movement to overcome segregation and racism. Using the "I have a dream" speech structure, identify the new dreams of your generation. Consider the injustices still plaguing the United States for ideas.

Your list of dreams should include at least 5 images of your version of a the ideal American society.



February 24/25, 2014
Vocabulary practice for list 13.
Chapters 13  Watsons Go to Birmingham

Writing response: 

Chapter 13
• How does Byron change when the Watsons arrive in Alabama?
• Why do you think he changes so suddenly?
• Why does Kenny decide that it is okay to go into the water at Collier’s Landing?
• What did you learn about Byron’s feelings for Kenny in this chapter?


February 21, 2014
Today we will watch an excerpt from the movie Watsons Go to Birmingham. We will compare and contrast the movie and the book. How is the lunch counter incident we learned about from the NPR and the movie version. Why did the producer portray the event in the movie the way he did?

February 20, 2014
Exercises pages 81-86

February 19, 2014
Standards: RL 8.9 I can analyze how historical events, settings, or characters are represented in fictional accounts.
Review of Chapters 10 and 11 

In the middle of the night during their trip to Birmingham, the family pulls over at a rest stop in Tennessee. It’s very dark because they are in the mountains, far away from any city, but the Watsons are more scared of the people they might come across in this part of the country than they are of the dark. Kenny and Byron decide to go to the bathroom in the woods.Byron tells Kenny, “Man, they got crackers and rednecks up here that ain’t never seen no Negroes before. If they caught [you] out here like this they’d hang you now, then eat you later.” When he says that the people would eat Kenny, Byron is exaggerating, of course, but at this time in the 1960s, the threat of violence against African Americans was very real.

Create a road map

Find five way points on the trip between Flint Michigan and Birmingham Alabama.

List the city and state you are going through.

How far is it from Flint? 

How far is it to Birmingham?

What interesting things are there to do or see in this city?

What is the population of the city?

Is it out of the way or is it right on your trip?

How long will it take to get from Flint to Birmingham taking your route?

Blank US Map


Mark your route on the map


February 18, 2014
Historical Background

Chapter 9- to page 130

Early Sunday morning, a week before the trip to Birmingham, Kenny and Dad sit and have a talk out in the car as they listen to records. Dad explains to Kenny that Byron is being sent Down South to get a good understanding of how the world works outside of his current world. With the recent, bad events happening down there between whites and blacks, Dad states that it is still quieter down there than it is in Flint and that’s best for By right now.

The night before the trip Momma and Dad get wind of a plan of By's to make a run for it to avoid Alabama. That night By sleeps in their room.


Writing Prompt: Page 126
"And you won't believe this, but if you listen to any kind of music long enough, first you get accustomed to it and then you learn to like it."
Write of a personal experience that relates to this quote. It might be about food, music, books, swear words, anything from your own experience. 


February 14, 2013
Vocabulary test 12
Chapters 1-8 Worm test
    Using your reading worm, write a one sentence summary of each chapter in the book. Turn in your worm and your test.


February 13, 2014
Finish reading chapter 8 in Watsons
Imagine you have been invited to join the Watsons on their trip to Alabama. Momma will pack the food and clothing, but you get to bring ten items with you. Remember, 
the back seat is going to be crowded with four children. Your items must be small enough to fit in a small bag. What will you bring and why?

February 12, 2014
Watsons Go to Birmingham chapter 8

The children realize something is up with their parents but they aren’t exactly sure of what it is. After dazzling the family with the Brown Bomber’s new record player, 

Dad breaks the news to By that he’s going Down South for the summer and potentially the next school year.


After reading chapter 8, make sure you fill out your worm for chapter 8. 

Writing a letter. Today we are going to write a letter from Grandma Sands to Bryron

Include a salutation, three body paragraphs, and a conclusion. 

Dear Byron,

Write a paragraph about Birmingham Alabama

Write a paragraph discussing Byron's behavior.

Write a paragraph explaining how you are going to treat Byron when he arrives. What will your expectations be when he arrives. 

Closing, 

Signature.



February 10/11, 2014
Today I will use vocabulary words in writing in preparation to show master on Friday's test. 
Vocabulary Exercises for lesson 12, pages 75-78.
Compare/contrast Watsons Go to Birmingham book with the movie. 
  • Similarities
  • Differences
  • Strengths
  • Weaknesses
  • Why did the director....
  • What would you have done differently?
Article of the Week "Hurricanes"




February 5, 2014
Watson's Go to Birmingham chapter 7
In Chapter 7 we find Byron once again in trouble. Somehow deciding that he wanted a change 
of hairstyle, Byron gets a new “conk,” a “process,” a “butter.” Momma says he looks like a clown 
with his chemically straightened, now reddish-brown hair, all stiff and sticky looking! She sends 
him to his room to wait for Dad to come home. Dad takes care of things by shaving Byron’s head 
completely bald! Byron was sent to his room and Joetta and Kenny were sent outside so that 
Momma and Dad could have one of their “adult-only” talks. The kids came back in the house just 
in time to hear Dad talking on the phone long distance to Grandma Sands in Alabama.

What does the following sentence mean? "Byron had gotten a conk! A process! A do! A butter! A ton of trouble! His hair 
was reddish brown, straight, stiff and slick-looking."

Four corner discussion. Each group will take the perspective of one of the following characters, Momma, Daddy, Byron, Joetta, Kenny. 
Read the following paragraph and as a group, determine why Byron behaves like he does. 

On page 92, Joetta asks Byron, “Byron, why won’t you behave? Why won’t you 
think about what’s going to happen to you when you do something wrong? 
Why do you always do stuff to get people mad at you?” Byron does not get a 
chance to answer because Dad has just walked in the door. If he had been able 
to respond, what do you think Byron would say? Would his response to Joetta 
be honest? Pretend you are a member of the Watson family and explain why 
you believe Byron has been behaving this way. What are solutions that could 
improve Byron’s behavior? 

Writing Prompt: Do you believe it was fair of Dad to shave Byron’s head? Explain.
What does it mean to be fair and just? When troublesome situations happen, how can we be sure to treat all people fairly?

February 3/4, 2014
Watson's Go to Birmingham chapters 5 and 6
Make sure you are writing each chapter's summary on your worm. 
Writing prompt: Write a half page personal narrative about a time you committed a dastardly deed. Please avoid telling me about an unlawful act. 

January 31, 2014
Vocabulary test 11
Watson's Go to Birmingham chapter 4 
Text to self connection: Please write about a time you have been bullied, you were the bully, or you witnessed someone being bullied. Compare that to the experience of By, Kenny, and Larry Dunn. 

January 30, 2014
Vocabulary review

January 29, 2014
What is a concrete detail?
Many of you are struggling with the idea of concrete details. Today we worked with Town House crackers to understand this idea better. 
  • Look at one cracker
  • List ten concrete details you see on the cracker. These are things that are right there in your face, for example, the cracker has salt on it. The cracker has ten holes in an even pattern on it. 
  • Now choose one concrete detail you think is important. For example, the cracker is oily. You can see this because the oil is on your fingers and on the paper that it was sitting on.
  • Bite the cracker in half. How does the oiliness add or detract from the cracker? Write two sentences analyzing the cracker as related to the oiliness. 
  • Now choose a second concrete detail. Mine is that the cracker broke really easily. 
  • Eat the second half. Analyze how breaking easily make the cracker better or worse. Write two sentences of analysis or commentary.
  • Write a conclusion. Do not add a new detail.
  • Now write the introduction. What is your paragraph about. Do not include phrases like, "I am going to write a paragraph about crackers." This makes your writing much weaker. Start with something like, ""Keebler sells a cracker called Town House crackers. 
Now write an 8 sentence paragraph using two different details and the commentary or analysis that goes with those details. 

January 27-28, 2014
Watsons go to Birmingham first half of chapter 4

Today we worked in jigsaw groups to read and analyze this five part article. 
  • During your first reading, mark confusions, questions, things you agree with, wonder about, overall annotate the article. 
  • Discuss with your group your annotations and listen to how they annotated.
  • During your second reading, find a concrete detail that you feel is very important.
  • Discuss with your group each of the concrete details you found.
  • During your third reading, continue to annotate and begin writing a summary
  • Discuss with your group your summary.
  • Now you will change groups and teach your new group your assigned paragraph, you are the expert!
  • Take notes from each other expert, see what they chose as their concrete detail.
  • Write their summary in the margins.
With your well annotated article, now write an 8 sentence paragraph.
• Reflect on two of the five things to be encouraged about listed above. 

January 24 , 2014

I can identify the differences among simple, compound, complex, and compound/ complex sentences.  

Watsons Go to Birmingham--1963 Finish reading chapters 3-4
Writing Prompt: (Checking for comprehension--chapter 4) Why do you think Byron stops Larry Dunn from giving Kenny a “Super Maytag” when Byron often plays similar tricks on Kenny himself?

Vocabulary: 
  • cockeyed or lazy-eyed: cross-eyed or having an eye that squints or slants.
  • egghead: a smart person.
  • hillbilly: a negative term used for a person from a backwoods area, especially from the mountains or from the southern United States.
  • peon:  a person who does hard or boring work for little or nothing in return.
  • jabber: to talk in a fast, confused, or foolish way that is hard to understand.
Review Concrete Details and Commentary

Painting with word structure

Sentence Structure: We might look at this picture and say, "The boy plays."
  1. Write one simple sentence about this picture. Have a subject and a verb only. 
  2. Next, add a pronoun, name the boy. Example, "Sean plays." 
  3. Next add a participle, "Sean has been playing."
  4. Next, add a appositive, a phrase that relates to Sean and is place near Sean in the sentence. Example, My grandson, Sean, has been playing."
  5. Now we will add an adjective*.  Example: "My excited grandson, Sean,( has been playing." Excited describes Sean, the pronoun, not playing, which is the verb.
  6. Next we will add an adverb**, My excited grandson Sean has been playing in the yard joyfully." Or it might say, "My excited grandson Sean has been joyfully playing." Joyfully describes the verb playing. While Sean is joyful, the word joyfully changes the meaning of the verb.

*In grammar, an adjective is a 'describing' word; the main syntactic role of which, is to qualify a noun or noun phrase, giving more information about the object signified.

**An adverb is a word that changes or qualifies the meaning of a verbadjective, other adverb, clausesentence or any other word or phrase, except that it does not include the adjectives and determiners that directly modify nouns


Here is another picture.  In six steps, move from a simple to a complex sentence. 

TODAY

Only write a sentence with a noun, verb, and three participles at the beginning of the sentence. 

Example: The bubbling, frothing, expanding milk added excitement to Sean's lunch.

January 23, 2014
Vocabulary Lesson 11 Exercises
Please bring a reading book to class today also.


January 22, 2014
What are the qualities of a good friend? What are the qualities of a bad friend? 
Read Chapter 3 WGTB--1963
Compare Kenny and Rufus, how do they rate in the friend category?
Use a T chart

    T-Chart 

Select two things to compare (ideas, characters, events, etc.). List the topics as headings for the columns below. Then make comparisons by writing statements in the corresponding columns.

Topic: Good Friend characteristics                                                     Topic: Bad Friend characteristics

List at least five characteristics for each topic.

In a short paragraph (8 sentences), write about what it takes to be a good friend. 


Eight sentence format

Introduction

Concrete Detail---this is an example from the text.

Commentary---how, what, why is this example important?

Commentary---tell more.

Concrete Detail---another example from the text.

Commentary---why is the second detail important?

Commentary--tell more.

Conclusion--without using the word conclusion in your writing, wrap up what you were talking about in this paragraph. 



January 21, 2014
I can explore how character, setting, and plot interact to support and develop a theme. 
Chapter 2 
Writing prompt: From Chapter 2 (checking for comprehension)--Why do you think Kenny is afraid when he realizes that the reading he has been chosen to do will be for Byron’s class?

Vocabulary Exercises 
Complete the sentence
Write the correct word

January 17, 2014
Vocabulary Quiz 11 today. Do not panic! This is an extra credit quiz (remember, we got ahead of the other 7th graders).

I can use precise words, relevant description, and sensory details to reveal the action and experiences of the story. 

Today we continued to work on found poems. One of the fun things about found poems is that we don't have to come up with our own words, we can borrow words from an author. What? Borrow words from an author? Isn't that plagiarism? No, this isn't plagiarism. Plagiarism is when we take an author's words and claim them to be our own. In this exercise, we will give Christopher Paul Curtis full credit and then we will adapt his words into poetry instead of prose. 

Found Poems are reader generated poems. We will use small sections of text and create poems that create meaning. This meaning may be consistent with Curtis' work or it may be reflective of our own thoughts. 


  • Use words and phrases from the story.
  • Add words of your own.
  • Rearrange words to develop meaning, to make some kind of sense.
  • Do not feel compelled to rhyme.
  • Arrange the words as phrases or chunks of meaning not as paragraphs.
Students will review chapter 1 and find a short piece of text that they find exceptionally descriptive. From this they will create their own found poem.

After we write a found poem from Watsons, we will look for poems in other texts. We could look in newspapers, magazines, other books, posters, anywhere we find prose. 

January 16, 2014
Vocabulary Lesson 11 Yellow Book
  • exercise "Write the Derivative" page 71
  • exercise "Find the Example" page 72
Tomorrow I will give test 11 from the yellow book.

The Watsons Go to Birmingham--1963 by Christopher Paul Curtis
Finish chapter 1. 
Make sure you write a summary that includes key events for chapter one (see summary from yesterday). 

I can use precise words, relevant description, and sensory details to reveal the action and experiences of the story. 

Today we finished reading chapter 1 in Watsons go to Birmingham--1963. 
We discussed the power of descriptive words that Christopher Paul Curtis used in his writing. 
We analyzed the use of a hook to engage us as readers. 


Found Poems are reader generated poems. We will use small sections of text and create poems that create meaning. This meaning may be consistent with Curtis' work or it may be reflective of our own thoughts. 


  • Use words and phrases from the story.
  • Add words of your own.
  • Rearrange words to develop meaning, to make some kind of sense.
  • Do not feel compelled to rhyme.
  • Arrange the words as phrases or chunks of meaning not as paragraphs.
Sample text from Watsons go to Birmingham--1963

But that was O.K because I had on three coats, two sweaters, a T-shirt, three pairs of pants, and four socks along with a scarf, a hat and a hood. These guys couldn't have hurt me if they'd thrown me off the Empire State Building!
After I climb out of the snowbank they start laughing and so did I.

Blizzard
Coats, sweaters, T-shirts, pants,
scarf, hat, hood. 
Snowbank had no effect.
I laughed.

Students will review chapter 1 and find a short piece of text that they find exceptionally descriptive. From this they will create their own found poem.


January 15, 2014
Vocabulary Lesson 11 Yellow Book
  • exercise "Write the Correct Word" page 69
  • exercise "Complete the Sentence" page 69
  •  Write a summary for each chapter. One chapter per one box.
The Watsons Go to Birmingham--1963 by Christopher Paul Curtis

Chapter 1
  • And You Wonder Why We Get Called the Weird Watsons

    • So, it's cold. Super-duper, spit freezing cold. And according to our narrator, Kenny, you would be stupid to go outside. In fact, it's so cold outside that it's also cold inside, and Kenny's family is huddled together on the couch, trying to keep warm.
    • While they're huddling and shivering, we learn that Kenny's family consists of Momma, Dad, little sister Joetta (Joey), and big brother Byron (an official teenage juvenile delinquent). They live in Flint, Michigan where the whole family was born. Oh, except for Momma, who is from Alabama and doesn't seem too happy about this cold, northerly weather.
    • To distract everyone from the cold, Dad starts telling the story of how Momma almost married Moses Henderson instead of him. Dad thinks this story is hilarious.
    • Momma points out that if she'd married Moses, at least they'd all be warm and living in Birmingham where "life is slower, the people are friendlier" (1.25). Dad is quick to remind her of the "Coloreds Only" bathroom in downtown Birmingham. The whatbathroom?
    • Dad seems to know this conversation is about to become an argument, so he calls Aunt Cydney, who has a brand new furnace, to see if they can spend the night.
    • Then he sends Byron and Kenny out to scrape the ice off the Brown Bomber (it's what they call their car... and we're beginning to see the weird).
    • Outside, Kenny and Byron are each scraping one side of the Bomber when Byron starts mumbling Kenny's name. Now, Byron is a known and ruthless prankster, so Kenny ignores him, assuming it's a trick. Our man Kenny's been around the block once or twice.
    • When Kenny finally does take a look, he finds that Byron's lips are stuck to the side mirror on the car. That's right; his lips froze to the mirror. How did his lips, of all things, get stuck to the car?
    • Well, Kenny doesn't stop to wonder and he doesn't pull any pranks (even though Byron would have certainly pranked Kenny if he was the one stuck); he just runs inside to get help. That Kenny is one of the good ones.
    • The whole family follows Kenny outside to see Byron. Momma screams and nearly faints. Joey starts crying. Dad starts laughing and making jokes—he figures out that the only way a person gets his lips stuck to a mirror is if he was making out with his own reflection. Nice one, By.
    • After some debate, the Weird Watsons decide to try pouring hot water on the mirror to unfreeze Byron's lips. The trouble is, it is so super-duper cold outside that the water freezes as soon as it touches the mirror. Uh oh. What now?
    • Momma starts freaking out and demands that Dad take Byron to the hospital. Dad points out that Byron would have to run alongside the car for that to work. Not an option.
    • Momma sends everybody inside to call the hospital and ask what to do. Dad and Joey go inside, but Kenny senses Momma is up to something, so he stays.
    • Momma starts talking real nice to Byron, saying she loves him and she'd never hurt him. Now Byron is suspicious too and he starts yelling for help as Momma grabs his head and yanks him off the mirror. Ouch! Byron runs in the house crying.
    • In the car on the way to Aunt Cydney's, Kenny finally takes advantage of the situation and invents a superhero called the Lipless Wonder in honor of Byron. The whole family cracks up, except Byron of course.
    • This round goes to Kenny.

January 13/14, 2014
Today is the beginning of third term. 

Reading Logs
  • you must read 20 minutes a night for a total of 100 minutes each night. 
Vocabulary Lesson 11
  • study 5-10 minutes each night in order to learn vocabulary words.
Article of the Week
  1. Introduction
  2. 1st textual evidence (a key point from the text)
  3. Analysis/commentary of sentence 2
  4. Additional analysis or commentary of sentence 2
  5. 2nd textual evidence 
  6. Analysis of sentence 5
  7. Additional analysis of sentence 5
  8. Conclusion


January 10, 2013
Today we will take the list 10 spelling/vocabulary test. 

January 9, 2014

Please read the short story "Waiting" by Budge Wilson. This can be found on pages 39-49 in the blue anthology. 

  1. Sibling rivalry is a term that describes strong feelings of competition among children in the same family. Why do you think some brothers and sisters need to compete against one another?
  2. Which of the twins would you prefer to have as a friend? Why?
  3. Choose one event from the story, such as the play at The Grove, and explain why it was significant in the story. Use textual evidence well written commentary in your response. 
  4. Compare/contrast  the short story to the poem Song of Myself by Walt Whitman (page 49). 


January 8, 2014
Writing prompt:
Write an 8 sentence paragraph explaining two things you learned this semester in English. The paragraph should be formatted as follows:
  1. Introduction
  2. First thing learned
  3. Analysis/commentary about why this was important
  4. Additional analysis
  5. Second thing learned
  6. Analysis/commentary about why the second thing is important
  7. Additional analysis
  8. Conclusion--tie the paragraph together

After you have written this paragraph, write another paragraph about two things you wished you had learned.


January 6/7, 2014
Today I will read and write at grade level, show comprehension by summarizing, and add analysis about excerpt. 

Writing prompt: Write a three paragraph story that doesn't include the word AND.
Each paragraph should be about 8 sentences. 

Reading: Each student will read a book of their choice. Make sure your book is at grade level or above. At the end of the class period you will write a brief summary and analysis about the book.

Make Up: Student who need to make up missing assignments will use this time to work.


December 16/17, 2013
Today I will explore the use of similes and metaphors in literature. I will create a group of similes and a group of metaphors to use in my poems. 

Simile Examples for Kids

simile is a figure of speech that compares two things or persons which are not similar. The simile is usually in a phrase that begins with "as" or "like." The often nonsensical aspect of similes make them a fun way to get kids excited about reading.

Similes for Kids

Simile examples that begin with “as”:

  • As American as apple pie
  • As big as an elephant
  • As black as coal
  • As blind as a bat
  • As bold as brass
  • As boring as watching paint dry  
  • As brave as a lion
  • As bright as a button
  • As busy as a bee
  • As cheap as dirt 
  • As clean as a whistle
  • As clear as mud
  • As clear as crystal
  • As cold as ice
  • As cool as a cucumber
  • As crooked as a dog's hind leg
  • As cunning as a fox
  • As cute as a bug's ear
  • As dead as a doornail
  • As deaf as a post
  • As difficult as nailing jelly to a tree
  • As dry as a bone
  • As dull as dishwater
  • As easy as ABC
  • As fit as a fiddle

Simile Poems by Denise Rogers

Here is an example of a simile poem written by Denise Rogers:

Your teeth are like stars;
They come out at night.
They come back at dawn
When they’re ready to bite.

Metaphor Examples for Kids

metaphor is a word or phrase that is used to make a comparison between two people, things, animals, or places. They can be very helpful for kids who are learning the meaning of specific words because they provide a more visual description of the word or thought.

Metaphors for Kids

  • The snow is a white blanket. 
  • America is a melting pot.  
  • Her lovely voice was music to his ears. 
  • Life is a roller coaster.  
  • The alligator’s teeth are white daggers.  
  • Their home was a prison. 
  • His heart is a cold iron.
  • She is a peacock.
  • He is a shinning star. 
  • Time is money.
  • My teacher is a dragon.
  • Tom’s eyes were ice.
  • The detective’s face was wood as he listened to her story.
  • She feels that life is a fashion show.
  • The world is a stage.
  • My kid’s room is a disaster area.
  • The children were flowers grown in concrete gardens.
  • Kisses are the flowers of affection.
  • His words were cotton candy.
  • Mary’s eyes were fireflies.
  • John’s suggestion was just a Band-Aid.
  • The cast on his broken leg was a plaster shackle.
  • Jane’s ambitions are a house of cards.

The Fish

I caught a tremendous fish
and held him beside the boat
half out of water, with my hook
fast in a corner of his mouth.
He didn't fight.
He hadn't fought at all.
He hung a grunting weight,
battered and venerable
and homely. Here and there
his brown skin hung in strips
like ancient wallpaper,
and its pattern of darker brown
was like wallpaper:
shapes like full-blown roses
stained and lost through age.
He was speckled with barnacles,
fine rosettes of lime,
and infested
with tiny white sea-lice,
and underneath two or three
rags of green weed hung down.
While his gills were breathing in
the terrible oxygen
- the frightening gills,
fresh and crisp with blood,
that can cut so badly- 
I thought of the coarse white flesh
packed in like feathers,
the big bones and the little bones,
the dramatic reds and blacks
of his shiny entrails,
and the pink swim-bladder
like a big peony.
I looked into his eyes
which were far larger than mine
but shallower, and yellowed,
the irises backed and packed
with tarnished tinfoil
seen through the lenses
of old scratched isinglass.
They shifted a little, but not
to return my stare.
- It was more like the tipping
of an object toward the light.
I admired his sullen face,
the mechanism of his jaw,
and then I saw
that from his lower lip
- if you could call it a lip
grim, wet, and weaponlike,
hung five old pieces of fish-line,
or four and a wire leader
with the swivel still attached,
with all their five big hooks
grown firmly in his mouth.
A green line, frayed at the end
where he broke it, two heavier lines,
and a fine black thread
still crimped from the strain and snap
when it broke and he got away.
Like medals with their ribbons
frayed and wavering,
a five-haired beard of wisdom
trailing from his aching jaw.
I stared and stared
and victory filled up
the little rented boat,
from the pool of bilge
where oil had spread a rainbow
around the rusted engine
to the bailer rusted orange,
the sun-cracked thwarts,
the oarlocks on their strings,
the gunnels- until everything
was rainbow, rainbow, rainbow! 
And I let the fish go. 

Elizabeth Bishop

The Fish Summary

The speaker catches a huge fish while fishing in a little rented boat. She studies her catch for a while as, holding it up half out of water beside the boat. The fish is pretty old and gnarly-looking, with barnacles and algae growing on it, and it also has five fishing hooks with the lines still partially attached hanging from its jaw.

The speaker considered how tough this fish must be and how much he probably had to fight. She begins to respect the fish. The poem takes its final turn when the oil spillage in the boat makes a rainbow and the speaker, overcome with emotion by the fish and the scene, lets the fish go.

Have you noticed the difference between similes and metaphors? A simile uses the word “like” or “as” to help make the comparison. (You can remember this by how the word simile looks like the word “similar.”) On the other hand, a metaphor directly compares two things by saying that one actually is the other.


Assignment: Write 10 similes and 10 metaphors.

Write on poem using either a simile or metaphor as your starting spot.

December 13, 2013
Vocabulary test list 9
Free reading for the rest of the class period. 

December 12, 2013
Today we will prepare for our vocabulary test by completing vocabulary exercise. 
Students will complete three exercises in lesson 9. If you miss class, please come talk to me about the exercises we completed during class.


December 1, 2013

Today I will learn about stanzas, couplets, tercets, and quatrains. I will explore the art of writing poetry by writing poem with either couplets or quatrains.

Stanza--A Stanza consists of two or more lines of poetry that together form one of the divisions of a poem. The stanzas of a poem are usually of the same length and follow the same pattern of meter and rhyme and are used like paragraphs in a story. Some different types of stanzas are as follows:

Couplets - Couplets are stanzas of only two lines which usually rhyme

                I have the measles and the mumps,
                a gash, a rash and purple bumps.
  • Tercets - Tercets are stanzas of three lines. The three lines may or may not have the same end rhyme. If all three lines rhyme, this type of tercet is called a triplet. A haiku is a form of a tercet poem. 
                As the wind does blow 
            Across the trees, I see the 
            Buds blooming in May
  • Quatrains - Quatrains are stanzas of four lines which can be written in any rhyme scheme. Shakespearean sonnets have three quatrains and one couplet with a set rhyme pattern. 
                    The mountain frames the sky 
               As a shadow of an eagle flies by. 
               With clouds hanging at its edge  
                A climber proves his courage on its rocky ledge. 

Couplet Example

The Red Wheelbarrow

William Carlos Williams


so much depends
upon

a red wheel
barrow

glazed with rain
water

beside the white
chickens.


Quatrain Example 


Assignment: Write a poem using either couplets or quatrains. The poem does not need to rhyme. 


December 11, 2013
RL 8.5 I can explain how the structure of a drama or poem helps me understand its meaning.

One Christmas story. A Cajun Night Before Christmas 

Twas the night before Christmas an' all t'ru de house,
Dey don't a ting pass Not even a mouse.
De chirren been nezzle good snug on de flo',
An' Mama pass de pepper t'ru de crack on de do'.

De Mama in de fireplace done roas' up de ham,
Sit up de gumbo an' make de bake yam.
Den out on de by-you dey got such a clatter,
Make soun' like old Boudreau done fall off his ladder.

I run like a rabbit to got to de do',
Trip over de dorg an' fall on de flo'.
As I look out de do'in de light o' de moon,
I t'ink, "Mahn, you crazy or got ol' too soon."

Cux dere on de by-you w'en I stretch ma'neck stiff,
Dere's eight alligator a pullin' de skiff.
An' a little fat drover wit' a long pole-ing stick,
I know r'at away got to be ole St.Nick.

Mo' fas'er an' fas'er de' gator dey came
He whistle an' holler an' call dem by name:
"Ha, Gaston! Ha, Tiboy! Ha, Pierre an' Alcee'!
Gee, Ninette! Gee, Suzette! Celeste an'Renee'!

To de top o' de porch to de top o' de wall,
Make crawl, alligator, an' be sho' you don' fall."
Like Tante Flo's cat t'ru de treetop he fly,
W'en de big ole houn' dorg come a run hisse's by.

Like dat up de porch dem ole 'gator clim!
Wit' de skiff full o' toy an' St. Nicklus behin'.
Den on top de porch roof it soun' like de hail,
W'en all dem big gator, done sot down dey tail.

Den down de chimney I yell wit' a bam,
An' St.Nicklus fall an' sit on de yam.
"Sacre!" he axclaim, "Ma pant got a hole
I done sot ma'se'f on dem red hot coal."

He got on his foots an' jump like de cat
Out to de flo' where he lan' wit' a SPLAT!
He was dress in musk-rat from his head to his foot,
An' his clothes is all dirty wit' ashes an' soot.

A sack full o' playt'ing he t'row on his back,
He look like a burglar an' dass fo' a fack.
His eyes how dey shine his dimple, how merry!
Maybe he been drink de wine from de blackberry.

His cheek was like a rose his nose a cherry,
On secon' t'ought maybe he lap up de sherry.
Wit' snow-white chin whisker an' quiverin' belly,
He shook w'en he laugh like de stromberry jelly!

But a wink in his eye an' a shook o' his head,
Make my confi-dence dat I don't got to be scared.
He don' do no talkin' gone strit to hi work,
Put a playt'ing in sock an' den turn wit' a jerk.

He put bot' his han' dere on top o' his head,
Cas' an eye on de chimney an' den he done said:
"Wit' all o' dat fire an' dem burnin' hot flame,
Me I ain' goin' back by de way dat I came."

So he run out de do' an, he clim' to de roof,
He ain' no fool, him for to make one more goof.
He jump in his skiff an' crack his big whip,
De' gator move down, An don' make one slip.

An' I hear him shout loud as a splashin' he go,
"Merry Christmas to all 'til I saw you some mo'!"

After this Christmas story, we will continue working on writing a sonnet.

December 9/10, 2013 
RL 8.5 I can explain how the structure of a drama or poem helps me understand its meaning.

Sonnet 18 William Shakespeare

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? 
Thou art more lovely and more temperate: 
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, 
And summer's lease hath all too short a date: 
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, 
And often is his gold complexion dimm'd; 
And every fair from fair sometime declines, 
By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd; 
But thy eternal summer shall not fade 
Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest; 
Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade, 
When in eternal lines to time thou growest: 
So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, 
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.


Sonnet Characteristics

A sonnet is simply a poem written in a certain format. You can identify a sonnet if the poem has the following characteristics:

  • 14 lines. All sonnets have 14 lines which can be broken down into four sections called quatrains.

  • A strict rhyme scheme. The rhyme scheme of a Shakespearean sonnet is ABAB / CDCD / EFEF / GG (note the four distinct sections in the rhyme scheme).

  • Written in iambic Pentameter. Sonnets are written in iambic pentameter, a poetic meter with 10 beats per line made up of alternating unstressed and stressed syllables.

A sonnet can be broken down into four sections called quatrains. The first three quatrains contain four lines each and use an alternating rhyme scheme. The final quatrain consists of just two lines which both rhyme.

Each quatrain should progress the poem as follows:

  1. First quatrain: This should establish the subject of the sonnet. 
    Number of lines: 4. Rhyme Scheme: ABAB

  2. Second quatrain: This should develop the sonnet’s theme. 
    Number of lines: 4. Rhyme Scheme: CDCD

  3. Third quatrain: This should round off the sonnet’s theme. 
    Number of lines: 4. Rhyme Scheme: EFEF

  4. Fourth quatrain: This should act as a conclusion to the sonnet. 
    Number of lines: 2. Rhyme Scheme: GG
In pairs you will work on writing a sonnet


Learning to Write a Sonnet


The sonnet form is old and full of dust
And yet I want to learn to write one well.
To learn new forms and grow is quite a must,
But I will learn it quickly, I can tell.

And so I sit, today, with pen in hand,
Composing three new quatrains with a rhyme.
The rhythm flows like wind at my command.
The A-B-A-B form consumes my time.

But I’m not done until there’s fourteen lines.
One ending couplet, after three quatrains.
I’ve tried to write this new form several times.
The effort’s huge; I have to rack my brain.

But I persist, my fourteen lines now done.
I wrote my poem; my sonnet work is won.

by Denise Rodgers


December 6, 2013

I can complete vocabulary exercises, learn spelling and definitions, and work toward mastery. I will earn a 70% or higher on my vocabulary test next Friday.

aspire

covet

envy

inclination

persevere

reluctant

tantalize

wary

willful

wistful


December 5, 2013

I will write a detailed description. I will analyze historical shape poetry and then mimic published author's poetry and show mastery by creating a shape poem of my own. 

Writing Prompt: Think of one object, animal, plant, or a piece of nature. Describe it!

The Red Wheelbarrow

 by William Carlos Williams


so much depends
upon

a red wheel
barrow

glazed with rain
water

beside the white
chickens.





From Easter Wings

George Herbert (1593-1633)


Lord, who createdest man in wealth and store,

Though foolishly he lost the same,

Decaying more and more,

Till he became

Most poore:

With thee

O let me rise

As larks, harmoniously,

And sing this day thy victories,

Then shall the fall further the flight in me.







Assignment:  Think of a shape that you would like to use. Create a poem that is made in that shape and that describes the shape.




December 4, 2013
RL 7.5 Analyze how a drama’s or poem’s form or structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its meaning

Today I will analyze how an author uses carefully chosen words to create tone in a poem. I will write expressions while paying careful attention to word or phrase tone. 

The following phrases mean exactly the same thing. But we would use each of the phrases only under certain circumstances. (A Poetry Handbook by Mary Oliver)

1. Hush!
2. Pleas be quiet!
3. Shut Up!

The first phrase might be used with a small child. It shows no anger. We might even view it as gentle. 
The second phrase is slightly curt or short. It might be used in a theater when asking strangers to be quiet. 
The third phrase is abrupt. It indicates, unarguably, impatience and even anger. Culturally we have come to understand that this expression is short, but we may not understand why. Hush is a soft sound, it has no clipped letters and can be said in a gentle way. Shut up has hard sounds, the t and p are called mutes that are not softened with a vowel. Both words have harsh endings or slapped closures (Shut, Up). 

Let's look at the two words Stone and Rock. Again, these words mean the same thing but sound different because of how the words end. Stone ends with a soft sound, Rock ends with a harsh K sound. 

Let's analyze Robert Frost's poem "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening."

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

BY ROBERT FROST

Whose woods these are I think I know.   
His house is in the village though;   
He will not see me stopping here   
To watch his woods fill up with snow.   

My little horse must think it queer   
To stop without a farmhouse near   
Between the woods and frozen lake   
The darkest evening of the year.   

He gives his harness bells a shake   
To ask if there is some mistake.   
The only other sound’s the sweep   
Of easy wind and downy flake.   

The woods are lovely, dark and deep.   
But I have promises to keep,   
And miles to go before I sleep,   
And miles to go before I sleep.

Robert Frost reading


Assignment: Today you will write a poem paying careful attention to the sounds of words. The poem should be at least eight lines long and be consistent with it's word sounds, either soft or crisp. You may use alliteration (beginning sounds are the same). Avoid rhyme for this exercise. 






December 2/3, 2013
RL 7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes and other repetitions of sounds (e.g., alliteration) on a specific verse or stanza of a poem or section of a story or drama.

Today I will read poetry and analyze how format influences meaning. I will be able to identify alliteration and assonance in a poem. 

Alliteration in Poems

There are numerous examples of alliteration in poems. For example:

Poe

Here are examples of alliteration taken from The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe:

  • Once upon a midnight dreary while I pondered weak and weary
  • ...rare and radiant maiden
  • And the silken sad uncertain rustling of each purple curtain
  • Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there wondering, fearing, Doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before

In this Poe poem, weak and weary; rare and radiant; silken and sad; deep and darkness; and wondering and fearing are all examples of alliteration.

Other Literary Examples

  • Hot-hearted Beowulf was bent upon battle - from Beowulf. This example of Medieval Anglo-Saxon poetry contains alliteration using Beowulf, bent and battle.
  • Behemoth, biggest born of earth, upheaved His vastness - from Paradise Lost by John Milton. This example also contains alliteration with Behemoth and biggest born.
  • Fly o'er waste fens and windy fields - from Sir Galahad by Alfred Tennyson. The example contains alliteration with fly, fens and fields.
  • Mary sat musing on the lamp-flame at the table - from The Death of the Hired Man by Robert Frost. Here, the alliteration is Mary and musing.
  • For the sky and the sea, and the sea and the sky - from the Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Samuel Taylor Coleridge. Sky and sea are alliterative devices here.

Alliteration in Nursery Rhymes

Mother Goose poems contain a great deal of alliteration. For example:

Betty Botter by Mother Goose

Betty Botter bought some butter, but, she said, the butter’s bitter; if I put it in my batter it will make my batter bitter, but a bit of better butter will make my batter better.

So she bought a bit of butter better than her bitter butter, and she put it in her batter and the batter was not bitter. So ’twas better Betty Botter bought a bit of better butter.

Three Grey Geese by Mother Goose

Three grey geese in a green field grazing, Grey were the geese and green was the grazing.

Baker’s Reply to the Needle Salesman by Unknown

I need not your needles, They’re needless to me, For kneading of needles, Were needless, you see; But did my neat trousers, But need to be kneed, I then should have need of your needles indeed. 

Alliteration in Tongue Twisters

Alliteration also makes tongue twisters even more difficult to say:

  • Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers. A peck of pickled peppers Peter Piper picked. If Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers How many pickled peppers did Peter Piper pick?
  • How much wood would a woodchuck chuck If a woodchuck would chuck wood? A woodchuck would chuck all the wood he could chuck If a woodchuck would chuck wood.
  • Silly Sally swiftly shooed seven silly sheep. The seven silly sheep Silly Sally shooed shilly-shallied south. These sheep shouldn’t sleep in a shack; Sheep should sleep in a shed.

Alliteration in Children's Books

Dr. Suess commonly used alliteration to make his books imminently readable. For example:

Through three cheese trees three free fleas flew. While these fleas flew, freezy breeze blew. Freezy breeze made these three trees freeze. Freezy trees made these trees’ cheese freeze. That’s what made these three free fleas sneeze.

Alliteration in Advertising

Alliteration has also become a common tool in advertising. Check out these two examples:

  • “You'll never put a better bit of butter on your knife." (advertising slogan for Country Life butter)
  • "The daily diary of the American dream." (a slogan of The Wall Street Journal)

Alliteration Then and Now

The application of alliteration in poetry and literature began ages ago, at the time when literature was born. It was widely applied in the 8th century poem entitled Beowulf for instance. Alliteration was widely celebrated in the writings of the most ancient Germanic and Norse works, including the prose, Edda.

Alliteration is a creative tool used in turning prose and poetry into more interesting and memorable pieces of literature, especially when recited. This device is now even commonly used by advertisers to create witty and memorable catchphrases and tag lines. It’s a fun play of words that brings out the imagination of the writer and the reader. 


How to Identify Alliteration

The best way to spot alliteration being used in a sentence is to sound out the sentence, looking for the words with the identical consonant sounds. For example, read through these sentences to test your skills in identifying alliteration:

  1. Alice’s aunt ate apples and acorns around August.
  2. Becky’s beagle barked and bayed, becoming bothersome for Billy.
  3. Carrie's cat clawed her couch, creating chaos.
  4. Dan’s dog dove deep in the dam, drinking dirty water as he dove.
  5. Eric’s eagle eats eggs, enjoying each episode of eating.
  6. Fred’s friends fried Fritos for Friday’s food.
  7. Garry’s giraffe gobbled gooseberryies greedily, getting good at grabbing goodies.
  8. Hannah’s home has heat hopefully.
  9. Isaacs ice cream is interesting and Isaac is imbibing it.
  10. Jesse’s jaguar is jumping and jiggling jauntily.
  11. Kim’s kid’s kept kiting.
  12. Larry’s lizard likes leaping leopards.
  13. Mike’s microphone made much music.
  14. Nick’s nephew needed new notebooks now not never.
  15. Orson’s owl out-performed ostriches.
  16. Peter’s piglet pranced priggishly.
  17. Quincy’s quilters quit quilting quickly.
  18. Ralph’s reindeer rose rapidly and ran round the room.
  19. Sara’s seven sisters slept soundly in sand.
  20. Tim’s took tons of tools to make toys for tots.
  21. Uncle Uris’ united union uses umbrellas.
  22. Vivien’s very vixen-like and vexing.
  23. Walter walked wearily while wondering where Wally was.
  24. Yarvis yanked you at yoga, and Yvonne yelled.
  25. Zachary zeroed in on zoo keeping.
Assignments

1.  Make a list of 15 brand names that use alliteration. (Hint, Dunkin' Donuts).

2.  Next, create a poem using your name. Each line needs to have at least three alliterations that match the letter from your name.
Example for Susana:
Surely she should sing in the shower
Unless her umbrella undermines the rain
Simply said, Susanna sounds superb
Announcing autumn's amazing array
Never noticing the nakedness of her neighbor's trees
Ash and oak, approaching winter with awe.

If your name is less than five letters long, use your first and last name.


November 25/26, 2013
Today I will read Boy and show comprehension and mastery of analysis by writing a one page response. I will discuss the problems/solutions Dahl experienced in his life and how these experiences affected me as the reader. 

Writing prompt:  From the perspective of the turkey.... 
We are finishing Boy today. This has been a wonderful journey and we will be sad to leave Roald Dahl for a time. 
Instead of a multiple choice exam, each student will write a one page essay discussing the most powerful event that happened in the book and three reasons this experience was important to the reader. Essays should always begin with an introduction. Here is an example that you may modify....Roald Dahl wrote a lovely book about his childhood. The story I found the most interesting was....

Vocabulary test 8 will be given today also.


November 22, 2013
Today I will write to describe. I will read for comprehension and pleasure

Writing prompt: In the morning it was raining. A fog had come over the mountains from the sea. You could not see the tops of the mountains. The plateau was dull and gloomy, and the shapes of the trees and the houses were changed. Ernest Hemingway

Write a passage that conveys a mood by describing weather. Use at least three vocabulary words.



November 21, 2013

Today I will finish creating my magic book. When this book is done, I will be able to use it as a tool to study my vocabulary. 
Today I will work in small groups comparing and contrasting key figures in Boy. 
Compare/Contrast key words
like        both        same        the same as        similar        as        in the same way        most important        to        have in common    
although              yet            whereas        however        but        while        differ        instead        unless    unlike        on the other hand

When we finish working in small groups, we will read Boy.


November 20, 2013
Today  will read sections of Boy. I will pre-read by reviewing pictures in the book. 
Roald Dahl lived in a period of time where children were dressed differently than they are today. 
When he was an infant until he was 3 or 4, he was dressed in a dress, lace and all. 
By the time he went to Llandaff Cathedral School, we wore shorts with knee socks or stockings. 
When Dahl began Repton, he was 13 years old and finally could wear long pants. 


Another thing to consider was how the Boazers punished the boys at Repton. Tomorrow we will work in small groups to compare/contrast the three headmasters at Roald's school and how they treated small boys. We will also C/C the headmasters with the Boazers.



November 18/19, 2013
We will use the magic book as a tool for studying vocabulary.
List 8
bliss
compassion
dismay
ecstatic
endear
exasperate
forlorn
somber
sullen
wretched


November 15, 2013
Vocabulary test 7
Silent Sustained Reading

November 14
Boy
Comprehension questions
Why does Captain Hardcastle accuse Roald of cheating?
What is a nib?
Why doesn't Roald just write a letter to his mother and tell her about the mistreatment at St. Peter's?
What happens to Roald during the Christmas break?
Does his nose come all the way off?


November 13, 2013
Extended Writing Response
Imagine that it is the year 1900 and you are a college president, outlining the need for an organization to help develop guidelines for football. Using the information provided in the Reading Comprehension passage (page 44 Vocabulary Book), write a persuasive essay to convince people that an organization to regulate football is needed. Or, if you choose, you may argue that the organization is not needed. In either case, you should include two or more points that support your position. Your persuasive essay should be at least three paragraphs long. Use at least three words in your essay and underline them. 

abstain
acknowledge
advocate
coalition
conform
invalid
justify
sanction
underlie
uphold


November 11/12, 2013
We finally got to the article about the $100 bill making it's debut. Pay careful attention to unfamiliar vocabulary words. Why do you think the author felt a need to discuss the governmental shutdown in this article?

Make sure you pay careful attention to how you begin a writing in prompt. When you are given an assignment that asks you to answer a question, many students tend to jump right into the answer without introducing the assigned topic. I see answers such as, "I think" or "Because last week the government shut down". When you answer like this, it is difficult for the reader to know what you are actually writing about. An example of of a good introduction is as follows; "In November, 2013, the United States released a new $100 bill." This brief introduction gives the reader a reference and an understanding of the topic of the essay. 

November 8, 2013
Homesickness Chapter 13
   RL 7.2  Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

The me message. What message can you find and apply to your own life?

Common Themes in literature include:
  1. Acceptance
  2. Courage
  3. Perseverance
  4. Cooperation
  5. Compassion
  6. Honesty
  7. Kindness
  8. Loyalty
Common Themes in Literature #2
  1. Man Struggles Against Nature
  2. Man Struggles Against Societal Pressure
  3. Man Struggles to Understand Spirituality
  4. Crime Does Not Pay
  5. Overcoming Adversity
  6. Friendship is Dependent on Sacrifice
  7. The importance of family
  8. Just when you think you have it figured out, a challenge arises and we have to balance it all out.
  9. Love is the worthiest of pursuits
  10. Death is part of the life cycle
  11. Sacrifices Bring Rewards
  12. Human beings all have the same needs
  13. What's the big idea
    Search for a Theme

  • What is one of the main themes in Boy? 
  • How has Roald Dahl effectively conveyed that theme throughout the entire book?
  • What evidence can you point to in the book that supports your idea of the theme?
Big Idea

November 7, 2013
  • What characters were mentioned in this chapter?
  • Choose one character from this chapter and describe how they relate to Roald Dahl.
  • In a short paragraph, what happened in this chapter?
  • Describe the matron as an animal. What animal do you think represents the matron best. Why? Use details from the chapter to back up your choice. 
November 6, 2013
Job Shadow Day
All 7th graders need to shadow an adult on their job. There will be no classes today for any 7th grader.

November 4/5, 2013
Answer all of the questions on the back of the article.

  • Write a brief letter home
  • Remember, it is going to be censured
  • What things do you think you would like to tell your mother?
  • How can you say it in a way that she will know what you are saying but you won't get into trouble?
November 1, 2013
Vocabulary Lesson 6 Test
Vocabulary Exercises--complete, correct, comprehension for lesson 7.
When you finish your vocabulary exercises, you may free read or free write.

October 30/31, 2013
Today and tomorrow are dedicated to Halloween. We are going to step away from Boy for a couple of days in order to give the walking dead some attention. 
Haiku is a poetry form that originated in Japan. We usually say that the poem is three lines long, with each line having a set number of syllables in it. This format is 5 syllables, 7 syllables, 5 syllables. 

Imagine some of the most famous poets writing haiku about zombies. The following poems are all fakes but written in the style of famous poets. 

Zombie Haiku by Dylan Thomas
Do not go gentle
into that zombie plagued night.
And take the shotgun.

Zombie Haiku by Sylvia Plath
From head to black shoe,
daddy, I had to eat you
because I’m starving.

Zombie Haiku by Robert Frost
Two lobes in the skull.
I eat the bloodier one – 
not much difference.

Zombie Haiku by e.e. cummings
if anyone lived
in this wretched how town (they)
would be soon eaten.

Zombie Haiku by Emily Dickinson
I heard a fly buzz
when I became a zombie.
That was one loud bug.

Zombie Haiku by Walt Whitman
Every skin atom
form’d from this soil, this air,
tastes like chicken meat.

Zombie Haiku by William Shakespeare
To bite through the skull
or beat it against the wall?
That is the question.

Zombie Haiku by Edgar Allen Poe
Beside of the sea
I killed my Annabel Lee
because zombies do that.

Zombie Haiku by Theodore Roethke
I knew a woman,
piled up once I ate her,
lovely in her bones.

The goal for this lesson is to write at least three zombie haikus. 

Haiku Lesson ideas

Haiku Starter

Writing Zombie Haiku Worksheet


October 28/29, 2013
Practice Vocabulary list 6
Make sure you use your T-chart from Friday. 
Halloween Story: The Black Cat  
                            audio



October 25, 2013
Read Chapter 10
Create a T chart and then read pages 46 through 49 (Mr. Coombs), and Captain Hardcastle, page 108/109.
Write as many details about each headmaster that you can find.

October 24, 2013
Chapter 10–“First Day”
  • Imagine going away to boarding school 
  • What would you want to take?
  • What favorite foods would you want packed in your tuck box?
  • Would you have a favorite stuffed animal or toy that you would want to bring?
Using the graphic organizer, describe the three most important things you would want in your tuck box. Give enough details that the reader can imagine the items.

October 23, 2013
1. We will review and answer questions about the WebQuest book report assignment. 
2. As we have read Boy, we have been introduced some of Roald Dahl's childhood memories. In response to reading Dahl's autobiography, students will choose one childhood memory and write it in an engaging style. Each story should be one page in length. We will work on these in class today and finish them in class tomorrow. 

October 21/22, 2013
Article of the Week
Writing Prompt: Using this article as a beginning point, write a Halloween appropriate horror story. 

Chapter 7 and 8 Boy--"Going to Norway" and "The Magic Island".

1. Describe in detail the ritual know as skaaling as presented in “Going to Norway?”
2. In "Going to Norway" and "The Magic Island" how does Roald Dahl portray his mother. Include an adjective that describes her in your topic sentence. The body of your sentence should include a lot of supporting detail.
3. Describe in detail some of the foods that Dahl remembers from childhood in “Going to Norway” and "Magic Island." Why do you think Dahl remembers food so clearly?


October 18, 2013
Spelling/Vocabulary test 5.
  • amelioration
  • assuage
  • compensate
  • conserve
  • constructive
  • enhance
  • enrichment
  • neutralize
  • preservation
  • redeem

After finishing the test, students will complete their one page childhood memory. 
As time allows, students will share their story with classmates. 

October 17, 2013
Make up, Catch up, Study for Vocabulary, Work on Author's Webquest


October 16, 2013
Book report assignment: Due October 28, 2013.
Choose one book that you are reading or have read recently.

Finish WebQuest about Roald Dahl


October 15, 2013
Boy chapter 6
 "Mrs. Pratchett's Revenge"
  • The boys get caned
  • Mrs. Pratchett encourages Mr. Coombes to hit them harder
  • Roald's Mother finds out--he is moved to a boarding school in England at the end of the school year.
In a class discussion we will explore the use of corporal punishment vs. detention in schools. We will refer back to the article Punishment in Boarding Schools in the Early 1900's. After our discussion, students will work in groups to evaluate the use of punishment as a means to change behavior. 

October 10, 11, 14, 2013
Fall Break
Don't forget to read over the break. Reading logs will be due on October 17, 2013

October 9, 2013

Students will have time in class to work on iPad's to complete this webquest. 

October 7/8, 2013
One page reflection due on Tuesday October 15
Chapters 5  "Mr. Coombes" 

October 4, 2013
Vocabulary Test 4
  • allure
  • avid
  • devotion
  • effusive
  • exhilaration
  • fanatic
  • indifferent
  • jubilant
  • reticent
  • zealous
After completing the test, students will pick up list 5 and do exercises on pages 27-32 in the workbook.
  • amelioration
  • assuage
  • compensate
  • conserve
  • constructive
  • enhance
  • enrichment
  • neutralize
  • preservation
  • redeem



October 3, 2013
Today we had a guest presentation from Provo Library. This was in anticipation of the Teen Fest at the library on October 12, 2013


October 2, 2013
Students will read and discuss the use of corporal punishment in the early 1900's. 

September 30 / October 1
As we read this article, we will look for:
  • Claim
  • Evidence
  • Support for the evidence
  • Counter argument
  • Conclusion
After reading and discussing the premise of the author, we will discuss the pros and cons of providing free lunch to all students. 
We will list these arguments on the board and then students will take a stand. 
  • Students will then make a bullet point list defending their stand.
  • An effective argument will have an introduction (background), a claim, two evidences with supporting data, a counter argument, and a conclusion. 
Students will then take the article home and discuss the article with an adult.  
After discussing the article, students write a one page reflection and turn it in on Wednesday.



We will then listen and read chapter 1 and chapter 2  "Starting Point" in Boy by Roald Dahl.
    
  • What is an Autobiography?

  • Where was the hometown of the family?

  • What was set up in Bute Street, Cardiff?

  • How old was Roald Dahl in 1918?

  • Who died from appendicitis?

  • Summarize the main events of the section.

    Enduring Questions

    • How personal experiences help to shape the person you are

    • Identifying culture and the role it plays in our lives

    • Facing challenges and taking responsibility

    • Developing relationships and showing growth







September 23/24, 2013
    I apologize for getting behind on our website. This week students listened to George's Marvelous Medicine and created a plot summary as they listened. Vocabulary test 4 will be given on October 3. Please help your students by having them study spelling and definitions. 













August 26/27, 2013
Today all 7th and 8th Graders took their DRP test. This test allows us to see reading abilities of students. 
Remember, vocabulary tests will be given on Friday. Make sure you study lesson 1. 


August 23, 2013
Learning Target: I can gain complex vocabulary by using contextual clues and definitions and then use it in my speaking, reading, and writing. 

Fridays will be vocabulary workdays all year. Today we will begin working on Vocabulary List #1.
We worked on the following exercises: Write the Correct Word, Complete the Sentence, and Reading Comprehension.  



August 22, 2013
Learning Target: I can learn class procedures, rules, expectations, and share them with my parent or guardian. 

Today we reviewed our disclosure document. Students were given a spiral notebook to use as a classroom writing journal. These journals will stay in class. Each student has a responsibility to bring paper, two pencils, and a personal reading book to class. There are books available in the school library or in my library to check out. We also spent a great deal of time trying to learn each other's names. 

Tonight is Centennial Middle School's Back to School night. We will be here from 6-8. 

Homework for tonight is the disclosure document signature page



August 21, 2013

Welcome to Centennial Middle School! Today we had a wonderful 7th grade day. You met your teachers, found lockers, hopefully you were able to finally get your locker to open. If you are still having problems, check with the counselors or with our head custodian Joe. They will make sure you get everything worked out. 

Some key topics we covered today:
  • Wolf Pack--we learned to howl like our little friend Chadwick.  We will use this howl when we are asked to cheer in assemblies.
  • Assembly Etiquette--remember, you sit with your wolfpack during assemblies.
  • You met via video, all of the key support staff at CMS
  • Citizenship and Responsibility means you take pride in our school, you take care of yourself, and you do your best.
  • We got to know classmates and tried to expand our friendship circle.
  • You learned what plus time and intervention time were for, and how to figure out which one to go to.
  • Finally, we discussed bullying. Remember, don't be the bully but don't stand for being bullied. Ask an adult for help if you are having problems.