This site is designed to house all the resources you'll need for covering 
the Google DeepMind Challenge Match, held from March 8 to March 15.

NOTE: This site is for press use only. Please don't link to it publicly.

Game Five Result
March 15, 2016

Final Press Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE


ALPHAGO DEFEATS LEE SEDOL IN FINAL GAME TO FINISH

GOOGLE DEEPMIND CHALLENGE MATCH 4-1


By winning four times against a world champion, AlphaGo has achieved a major milestone for artificial intelligence a decade earlier than predicted


Seoul, South Korea (March 15, 2016) — At today’s fifth and final game in the Google DeepMind Challenge Match, the Go-playing computer program, AlphaGo, defeated the best Go player of the last decade, Lee Sedol, in a very close game. Playing as white, AlphaGo won by resignation after 280 moves. Both AlphaGo and Lee used their entire two hours of playtime, and Lee went through two byō-yomi overtime periods.


The game was tight until the very end, with commentators going back and forth about who was in the lead. At the beginning, AlphaGo ceded major territory and “thickness” to Lee but came back strong to eke out a narrow victory on the rest of the board.


With AlphaGo’s victory in the Google DeepMind Challenge Match, Google DeepMind will donate the $1 million USD in prize money to UNICEF, STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) charities, and Go organizations.


Demis Hassabis, Co-Founder and CEO of DeepMind, said about the entire tournament, “In the past ten days, we have been lucky to witness the incredible culture and excitement surrounding Go. Despite being one of the oldest games in existence, Go this week captured the public’s attention across Asia and the world. We thank the Korea Baduk Association for co-hosting the match, and thank all of you who watched. And of course, we want to express our enormous gratitude towards Lee Sedol, who graciously accepted the challenge and has been an incredible talent to watch in every game. Without him we would not have been able to test the limits of AlphaGo.” He continued, “We wanted to see if we could build a system that could learn to play and beat the best Go players by just providing the games of professional players. We are thrilled to have achieved this milestone, which has been a lifelong dream of mine. Our hope is that in the future we can apply these techniques to other challenges — from instant translation to smartphone assistants to advances in health care.”


Lee Sedol said at the post-game press conference, “I am very sorry that the Google DeepMind Challenge Match is over. Today I wanted to bring the match to a successful conclusion. Personally, I am regretful about the result, but would like to express my gratitude to everyone who supported and encouraged me throughout the match.” In response to a journalist’s question, Lee said, “I have questioned at some points in my life whether I truly enjoy the game of Go, but I admit that I enjoyed all five games against AlphaGo. After my experience with AlphaGo, I have come to question the classical beliefs a little bit, so I have more study to do.”


Michael Redmond, English commentator and 9-dan professional, said, “It was difficult to say at what point AlphaGo was ahead or behind, a close game throughout. AlphaGo made what looked like a mistake with move 48, similar to what happened in Game Four in the middle of the board. After that AlphaGo played very well in the middle of the board, and the game developed into a long, very difficult end game.” Redmond also had thoughts on the future potential of the software, “AlphaGo has the potential to be a huge study tool for us professionals, when it’s available for us to play at home.”


Kim Seongryong, Korean commentator and 9-dan professional, said, “Just like the scientists, Go players are always trying to find new methods and approaches. And we are so happy when we find them. This Challenge Match has brought us Go players to new areas we’ve never explored. We are now seeing a lot more interest in playing Go. And even in one week, I feel like my Go playing has improved.”


Chris Garlock, English commentator and Managing Editor of The American Go E-Journal, said, “This was an amazing match… the drama, the historic aspect, the quality of the games, the brilliance of AlphaGo, the brilliance of Lee Sedol, and then the amount of media coverage. I just want to say thanks to the entire DeepMind AlphaGo team. This is a gift to Go. This is going to do a lot to bring Go to new audiences. We could not have dreamed this up any better, and it delivered beautiful games. This match has done what Go always does: brings people together in friendship and cooperation, and that, like the game itself, is beautiful.”


For more information, check the Google DeepMind Challenge Match press site at: https://sites.google.com/a/pressatgoogle.com/alphago/


About Google DeepMind

DeepMind was founded in London in 2010 by Demis Hassabis, Shane Legg and Mustafa Suleyman. The mission of DeepMind is to solve intelligence and use it to make the world a better place. DeepMind was supported by some of the most iconic tech entrepreneurs and investors of the past decade, prior to being acquired by Google in early 2014 in their largest European acquisition to date.

Final Game Summary






English language press conference: https://goo.gl/ZQKSUy
Korean language press conference: https://goo.gl/qp4hHj

Game Four Result
March 13, 2016

Game Four Press Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE


LEE SEDOL WINS AGAINST ALPHAGO IN GAME FOUR


Legendary Go champion Lee Sedol fights back after losing the first three games of the Google DeepMind Challenge Match to solidly defeat AlphaGo


Seoul, South Korea (March 13, 2016) — At today’s fourth game in the Google DeepMind Challenge Match, the best Go player of the last decade, Lee Sedol, came back from three consecutive losses to beat the Go-playing computer program, AlphaGo. Playing as white, Lee won when AlphaGo resigned after 180 moves.


Reporters gave Lee Sedol a standing ovation as he entered the press conference. Lee commented, “I’ve never been congratulated so much just for winning a single game. I would not exchange today’s win with anything else in the world. I’d like to thank you all for your encouragement and support — the driver behind the win I achieved today.”


Demis Hassabis, CEO of Google DeepMind said, “Lee Sedol has once again showed what an incredible player he is. He was too good for AlphaGo today. AlphaGo started off strong but was pressured by Lee’s brilliant play into making some mistakes, of which he took advantage. We came to Korea to test the limits of AlphaGo, and we’ve certainly done that today. Huge congratulations to Lee Sedol, and we’re excited to see what the final game on Tuesday brings.”


David Silver, Lead Researcher on AlphaGo at Google DeepMind, explained, “AlphaGo learns for itself and improves from self-play, so it's hard to say when and where holes in its knowledge will occur. But it's possible that a strong player might be able to push AlphaGo into one of these holes, and I'd like to congratulate Lee on finding a sequence in the centre that caused AlphaGo such difficulties. This is why we came here — it’s hard to find weaknesses from internal evaluations alone — and we needed a creative genius to help us learn more.”


Michael Redmond, professional 9-dan Go player, said “Today’s game was another example of AlphaGo playing a very interesting, good game. However, move 78 by Lee Sedol was really brilliant — and enabled him to win.“


Song Taegon, 9-dan, Korean commentator, said “It seems Lee Sedol can now read AlphaGo better and has a better understanding of how AlphaGo moves. The fifth game will be a far closer battle than before. Professional Go players said that they became even more interested in Go after witnessing AlphaGo’s innovative moves. People started to rethink moves that were previously regarded as undesirable or bad moves. AlphaGo can help us think outside of the box in Go games.“


AlphaGo’s first three wins already secured overall victory in the Google DeepMind Challenge Match, but today’s loss heightens the drama going into the final game, Game Five, which will be played on Tuesday, March 15 at 1pm KST.


For more information, check the Google DeepMind Challenge Match press site at: https://sites.google.com/a/pressatgoogle.com/alphago/


About Google DeepMind

DeepMind was founded in London in 2010 by Demis Hassabis, Shane Legg and Mustafa Suleyman. The mission of DeepMind is to solve intelligence and use it to make the world a better place. DeepMind was supported by some of the most iconic tech entrepreneurs and investors of the past decade, prior to being acquired by Google in early 2014 in their largest European acquisition to date.

90s Summary of Game Four



Quotes from Experts
As of March 13, 2016

Quotes from Experts

“AlphaGo is powerful, perfect and impeccable today!” — Ke Jie, China’s No.1 Go player (March 12)


“Today can be marked as the most glorious,competitive and respectable time for Go in its history. Although it’s a little bit sad to meet AlphaGo at this point of time, it is still the most appropriate time for Lee Sedol - he meets the strongest rival at his strongest. Go ahead! Play again, in a beautiful manner.” — Wang Shuo, chief editor of Caixin, one of the most influential business media in China  (March 12)


“AlphaGo took some actions only god could do” — Gu Li, holding the most world champions among Chinese Go players (March 10)


“I was so impressed by the performance of AlphaGo. It did not go according to the data set from human but made his own tactical move.” — Nie Weiping, Grandmaster of Go in China (March 10)


“As a famous saying goes from AI academic circle, how much artificial work you take, how much intelligence you will receive. We should keep in mind that scientists from Google team have paid much human and material resources behind AlphaGo. AI has great potential in the future, and we should  set up a rational view to the human VS machine game. No matter who finally wins, it is absolutely an beneficial practice in the development of computer science.” — Wang Weilian, AI professor (March 11)


“From human’s viewpoint, AlphaGo may be a Robot oddball, just like how Wu Qingyuan was regarded as a Chinese oddball 80 years ago, from doubts, worries, and finally to admiration. Regardless of win or lose, it is the top choice for Go community to accept AlphaGo. And this is also a top opportunity for this ancient game to embrace a new future.” — Chu Dachen, Sina vice president of strategy, PhD of physics of Stanford (March 11)


“AlphaGo’s win could be referred to as the introduction of a smart servant. If a servant is smart, the master would enjoy a convenient life. There is nothing to be afraid of. Artificial Intelligence and human are not targets to overcome. Smart AI makes our life more convenient” — Jin-Hyung Kim of Artificial Intelligence and Pattern Recognition Lab, Computer Science Department of KAIST, quoted in JoongAng Ilbo


“Congrats to DeepMind! Many experts in the field thought AI was 10 years away from achieving this.” — Elon Musk


“It’s not ‘man versus’ machine, but rather an impressive triumph for the brilliant (human) researchers and engineers at DeepMind and Google.” — Oren Etzioni, CEO of Allen Institute for AI, in GeekWire.




Third Game Result
March 12, 2016

Press Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE


ALPHAGO WINS THIRD GAME AGAINST LEE SEDOL TO WIN

GOOGLE DEEPMIND CHALLENGE MATCH


Computer program AlphaGo’s victory against legendary human player Lee Sedol was a historic Go match and a milestone for artificial intelligence


Seoul, South Korea (March 12, 2016) — At today’s third game in the Google DeepMind Challenge Match, the Go-playing computer program, AlphaGo, won for the third time to claim overall match victory against the best Go player of the last decade, Lee Sedol. Playing as white, AlphaGo won by resignation after 176 moves. Lee used up all of his time and two periods of byō-yomi overtime, while AlphaGo had 8:31 left on the clock.


AlphaGo created a large territory on the board but Lee Sedol used a few innovative tactics to start a huge all-or-nothing fight and complicate the situation. In the resulting fight, AlphaGo prevailed.


All five games in the Match will be played: The next game, Game Four, will be on Sunday, March 13, and the final game, Game Five, will be on Tuesday, March 15.


Demis Hassabis, Co-Founder and CEO of DeepMind, said, “This is a moment to celebrate human achievement — the genius that is Lee Sedol and the incredible work of so many people to make this scientific breakthrough. We’re stunned, and to be honest, I’m a bit speechless.” He continued, “AlphaGo evaluates tens of thousands of possible moves per second, and what is incredible is that Lee Sedol can compete so closely with just the power of his mind. For three games, Lee pushed AlphaGo to its limit. We're thrilled to have won the tournament — a lifelong dream of mine and a grand challenge of artificial intelligence. But we still have two games to play and many more years of research ahead to understand how we can apply these techniques beyond games and help society solve some of its biggest problems."


Sergey Brin, President of Alphabet Inc., said, “Go is a beautiful game. It is incredible, at last, to see that beauty intertwined between man and machine. My congratulations to Lee Sedol and the DeepMind team.”


Lee Sedol said at the post-game press conference, “When I look back on the three matches, even if I were to go back and redo the first match, I think I would not be able to win because I misjudged AlphaGo. At the beginning of the second game, the game flowed the way I intended but there were a number of missed opportunities. For the third match, I have extensive experience in playing the game of Go, but I never felt a case like this with so much pressure, which I was unable of overcoming. For Games Four and Five, I ask that you continue to be interested and follow what happens.”


Michael Redmond, professional 9-dan Go player, said about the play in the third game, “It’s arguable that in the first two games Lee Sedol was playing differently than his true style, trying to find a weakness in the computer. Today, Lee was definitely playing his own game, from his strong opening to the complicated moves in the final kō. AlphaGo was ready for everything, including the kō fights, and was able to take the win. I’d like to congratulate the people who actually made this accomplishment possible, because AlphaGo is a work of art.”


Lee Hyunwook, 8-dan, Korean commentator, said,“AlphaGo was stronger than anyone had expected. Lee used aggressive tactics from the very beginning, but AlphaGo countered them with a strong force in the opening and the middle game. It was stunning to see Lee’s combative spirit even when he was at a disadvantage.”


Kwon Kapyong, 8-dan, teacher of Lee Sedol, said, “AlphaGo is an incredible Artificial Intelligence. Lee Sedol, who played very tight games against AlphaGo, is already a winner. Throughout the games, he showed the world what Go is. I hope Lee Sedol plays whatever moves he wants to play and enjoys the rest of the match.”


With AlphaGo’s win, DeepMind will donate the $1 million USD in prize money to UNICEF, STEM charities, and Go organizations (more details to follow).


For more information, check the Google DeepMind Challenge Match press site at: https://sites.google.com/a/pressatgoogle.com/alphago/


About Google DeepMind

DeepMind was founded in London in 2010 by Demis Hassabis, Shane Legg and Mustafa Suleyman. The mission of DeepMind is to solve intelligence and use it to make the world a better place. DeepMind was supported by some of the most iconic tech entrepreneurs and investors of the past decade, prior to being acquired by Google in early 2014 in their largest European acquisition to date.

Third Game 90s Summary





Second Game Result
March 10, 2016

Text Box

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE


GOOGLE DEEPMIND’S ALPHAGO BEATS LEE SEDOL AGAIN

IN SECOND GAME OF FIVE-GAME GO MATCH


Computer program AlphaGo goes to 2-0 in historic five-game Challenge Match

against legendary human player Lee Sedol


Seoul, South Korea (March 10, 2016) — At today’s second game in the Google DeepMind Challenge Match, the Go-playing computer program, AlphaGo, again defeated the best Go player of the last decade, Lee Sedol. Playing as black, AlphaGo won by resignation after 211 moves. Both Lee Sedol and AlphaGo used their entire two-hours of regulation time, going into byō-yomi overtime.


AlphaGo made many creative moves that surprised the expert commentators. Michael Redmond, the 9-dan US commentator, said “I was impressed with AlphaGo’s play. There was a great beauty to the opening. Based on what I had seen from its other games, AlphaGo was always strong in the end and middle game, but that was extended to the beginning game this time. It was a beautiful, innovative game.”


Yoo Changhyuk, 9-dan, Korean commentator, said “During the first match, Lee Sedol made difficult moves to agitate AlphaGo, but failed to do so. Today, he tried the opposite — he played safe and entered the endgame. While using his byō-yomi periods, he made some mistakes, which I think caused the defeat.”


Demis Hassabis, Co-Founder and CEO of DeepMind, said, “That was dramatic to say the least! Lee Sedol put up an incredible performance and had our expert commentators divided over the result until the end. AlphaGo played some really surprising and beautiful moves in this game.”


Lee Sedol said at the post-game press conference, “Yesterday, I was surprised, but today I am quite speechless. If you look at the way the game was played, it was a very clear loss on my part. Yesterday I felt like AlphaGo played certain problematic positions, but today I felt that AlphaGo played a near perfect game. There was not a moment I felt like its moves were unreasonable.”


A player needs three wins to claim victory in the five-game tournament, but either way, all five games will be played to determine the final match score. The next game, Game Three, will be held at 1pm KST on Saturday, March 12. Game Four will be on Sunday, March 13, and the final game, Game Five, will be on Tuesday, March 15. $1 million USD in prize money goes to the winner. If AlphaGo wins, the prize money will be donated to UNICEF, STEM charities, and Go organizations.


For more information, check the Google DeepMind Challenge Match press site at: https://sites.google.com/a/pressatgoogle.com/alphago/


About Google DeepMind

DeepMind was founded in London in 2010 by Demis Hassabis, Shane Legg and Mustafa Suleyman. The mission of DeepMind is to solve intelligence and use it to make the world a better place. DeepMind was supported by some of the most iconic tech entrepreneurs and investors of the past decade, prior to being acquired by Google in early 2014 in their largest European acquisition to date.

Second Game Summary






First Game Result
March 9, 2016

Text Box

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE


GOOGLE DEEPMIND’S ALPHAGO DEFEATS LEE SEDOL AT GO

IN CLOSE FIRST GAME


Computer program AlphaGo wins first game of five-game match, the first time in history artificial intelligence has beaten a top-ranked human Go champion at the ancient game


Seoul, South Korea (March 9, 2016) — At today’s first game in the Google DeepMind Challenge Match, the Go-playing computer program, AlphaGo, defeated the best Go player of the last decade, Lee Sedol. AlphaGo won by resignation after 186 moves. While there are still four games left in the Challenge Match, this marks the first time in history that a computer program has defeated a top-ranked human Go player on a full 19x19 board with no handicap.


Go has been viewed as one of the hardest games for computers to master due to its sheer complexity. There are roughly 200 possible moves for a given turn compared to about 20 in chess, and more possible board configurations than the number of atoms in the universe. DeepMind first released details of AlphaGo in a paper published in the scientific journal Nature last month.


The exciting first game looked to be neck-and-neck for its entirety, filled with complex fighting on both sides. Lee Sedol made very aggressive moves, but AlphaGo never backed down from the fights. AlphaGo was down to 5:30 of its time, compared to Lee Sedol, who had 28:28 left on the clock.


Demis Hassabis, Co-Founder and CEO of DeepMind, said, “What an incredibly exciting game. Lee Sedol is a formidable opponent, famed for his fighting style, and AlphaGo decided to go toe-to-toe with him, which made for a tense, close-fought game. We still have four games to go, so anything can still happen. Whatever the outcome, we feel this match is a testament to the power of human ingenuity.”


Lee Sedol said at the post-game press conference, “I would like to express my respect to Demis and his team for making such an amazing program like AlphaGo. I am surprised by this result. But I did enjoy the game and am looking forward to the next one.”


The winner of the Challenge Match must win at least three of the five games in the tournament, so today’s result does not set the final outcome. The next game will be Thursday, March 10 at 1pm Korea Standard Time, followed by games on Saturday, March 12, Sunday, March 13, and Tuesday, March 15. The matches will be played under Chinese rules with a komi of 7.5 (the compensation points the player who goes second receives at the end of the match). Each player will receive two hours per match with three lots of 60-second byoyomi (countdown periods after they have finished their allotted time).


For more information, check the Google DeepMind Challenge Match press site at: https://sites.google.com/a/pressatgoogle.com/alphago/


About Google DeepMind

DeepMind was founded in London in 2010 by Demis Hassabis, Shane Legg and Mustafa Suleyman. The mission of DeepMind is to solve intelligence and use it to make the world a better place. DeepMind was supported by some of the most iconic tech entrepreneurs and investors of the past decade, prior to being acquired by Google in early 2014 in their largest European acquisition to date.


END

First game summary video




Running blog with updates on Google APAC blog

Prior Assets
Press release with match rules Video for original announcement Assets for Nature paper
Images (Demis Hassabis, David Silver, Fan Hui, Lee Sedol and AlphaGo representations)

The LiveStream
For livestream with English commentary: DeepMind YouTube Channel (okay to embed) For livestream with Korean commentary, click on this link
For livestream with no sound, please let us know and we will send you the link

For the Tuesday, March 8 press conference:
Korean Language Press Conference https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rZ10-AYgro0
English Language Press Conference https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VbEvowgWGwI


Spokespeople Bios


Demis Hassabis
VP, Engineering, Google DeepMind

데미스 하사비스

구글 딥마인드(DeepMind) 공동 창업자 및 CEO / 구글 엔지니어링 부사장



Profile

Dr. Demis Hassabis is the co-founder and CEO of DeepMind, a neuroscience-inspired AI company, bought by Google in Jan 2014 in their largest European acquisition to date. He is now Vice President of Engineering at Google DeepMind and leads Google’s artificial general intelligence efforts. Demis is a former child chess prodigy, reaching master standard at the age of 13, and was the second highest rated player in the world for his age after Judit Polgar. He finished his A-levels two years early before coding the multi-million selling simulation game Theme Park aged 17. Following graduation from Cambridge University with a Double First in Computer Science he founded the pioneering videogames company Elixir Studios producing award-winning games for global publishers such as Vivendi Universal. After a decade of experience leading successful technology startups, Demis returned to academia to complete a PhD in cognitive neuroscience at UCL, followed by postdocs at MIT and Harvard, before founding DeepMind. His research connecting memory with imagination was listed in the top ten scientific breakthroughs of 2007 by the journal Science. Demis is a 5-times World Games Champion, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, and the recipient of the Royal Society’s prestigious Mullard Award 2014.


데미스 하사비스는 구글 딥마인드의 엔지니어링 부사장으로, 구글의 범용 인공지능 (Artificial General Intelligence)을 이끌고 있다. 신경과학 기반의 인공지능 기술 회사인 딥마인드(DeepMind)의 공동창업자이자 CEO인 데미스는 2014년 1월 딥마인드가 구글에 인수되면서 구글에 합류하게 되었다. 어린 시절 체스 영재로 주목받았던 데미스는 13살의 나이에 마스터 수준에 이르렀고, 당시 같은 연령대 그룹에서 주디트 폴가(Judit Polgar)에 이어 세계 랭킹 2위를 차지했다. 영국 대학입학 준비과정인 A레벨을 2년 빨리 마쳤고, 17살에는 수백만 판매를 달성한 시뮬레이션 게임 ‘테마 파크(Theme Park)’를 개발했다. 캠브리지 대학교 컴퓨터 학사 과정을 우수한 성적으로 졸업한 후 비디오게임 회사 엘릭서 스튜디오(Elixir Studios)를 설립하고 비방디 유니버셜(Vivendi Universal) 등 글로벌 게임 퍼블리셔와의 협업해 유수의 게임들을 출시했다. 데미스는 10년 간 성공적인 기술 스타트업들을 이끈 후, 다시 학계로 돌아와 영국 유니버시티 칼리지 런던(UCL, University College London)에서 인지신경과학 박사 학위를 취득하고, 딥마인드를 창업하기 전에는 미국 MIT와 하버드에서 박사후 연수 과정을 밟았다. 기억과 상상의 연결에 대한 데미스의 연구는 사이언스 지의 ‘2007 획기적인 연구 10건’ 중 하나로 선정된 바 있다. 세계 게임 챔피언 자리에 5번 오른 데미스는 영국왕립예술협회의 특별회원(Fellow)이며, 2014년에는 왕립협회가 선정하는 뮬라드상(Mullard Award)을 수상했다.



David Silver Research Scientist, Google DeepMind 

데이비드 실버 구글 딥마인드(DeepMind) 리서치 사이언티스트 - 강화 학습 연구 총괄



Profile

David Silver leads the reinforcement learning research group at Google DeepMind. David graduated from Cambridge University in 1997, achieving the top marks in Computer Science. Subsequently, David co-founded the videogames company Elixir Studios, where he was CTO and lead programmer, winning numerous awards for technology and innovation. David returned to academia in 2004 to study for a PhD on reinforcement learning in computer Go, where he co-introduced the algorithms used in the first master-level 9x9 Go programs. David was awarded a Royal Society University Research Fellowship in 2011, and subsequently became a lecturer at University College London. David consulted for DeepMind from its inception, joining full-time in 2013. His recent work has focused on combining reinforcement learning with deep learning, including a program that learns to play Atari games directly from pixels (Nature 2015).



데이비드 실버 박사는 구글 딥마인드에서 리서치 사이언티스트로서 강화 학습(reinforcement learning) 연구를 총괄하고 있다.  데이비드 실버는 1997년 캠브릿지 대학교를 우수한 성적으로 졸업한 후 비디오게임 회사 엘릭서 스튜디오(Elixir Studios)를 공동 창업하였으며, 엘릭서 스튜디오의 CTO이자 수석 프로그래머로서 다수의 기술 및 혁신 분야 상을 수상하였다. 데이비드 실버는 2004년 시작한 컴퓨터 바둑 강화 학습 분야 박사 과정에서 최초의 9줄 바둑 마스터 레벨 프로그램에 사용된 알고리즘을 공동 개발했다. 데이비드는 2011년 영국왕립협회의 대학 연구 펠로십을 수상했으며 유니버시티 칼리지 런던에서 강사직을 맡았다. 2013년 인셉션 분야 자문을 맡고 있던 딥마인드에 합류하였다. 데이비드 실버는 최근 원시 픽셀 입력을 통해 아타리(Atari) 사의 게임 플레이 방법을 학습하는 프로그램과 같은 강화학습과 딥 러닝의 결합에 대한 연구에 집중하고 있다.



Jeff Dean Google Senior Fellow

제프 딘, 구글 시니어 펠로우



Profile

Jeff Dean joined Google in 1999 and is currently a Google Senior Fellow in Google's Research Group, where he leads the Google Brain team,Google's deep learning research team in Mountain View.  He has co-designed/implemented five generations of Google's crawling, indexing, and query serving systems, and co-designed/implemented major pieces of Google's initial advertising and AdSense for Content systems.  He is also a co-designer and co-implementor of Google's distributed computing infrastructure, including the MapReduce, BigTable and Spanner systems, protocol buffers, LevelDB, systems infrastructure for statistical machine translation, and a variety of internal and external libraries and developer tools.  He is currently working on large-scale distributed systems for machine learning.  He received a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Washington in 1996, working with Craig Chambers on compiler techniques for object-oriented languages.  He is a Fellow of the ACM, a Fellow of the AAAS, a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering, and a recipient of the Mark Weiser Award and the ACM-Infosys Foundation Award in the Computing Sciences.


Lee Sedol 9dan Go Player
이세돌 9단


Profile

Born on March 2, 1983
Debuted as a 1 dan professional in 1995 (his older brother was also a professional player, becoming the second professional-brother case.)
Won first domestic title (The 5th Bacchusd Cup) in 2000
Won first international title (The 15th Fujitsu Cup) in 2002
Promoted to 9 dan (highest in professional rank) in 2003
Won Gold Medal, 2010 Asian Games in Guangzhou, Men's Team division (Korean team won)
Won over 30 domestic titles and 18 international titles in total (2000 - 2016)

이세돌은 한국의 프로 바둑 기사이다. 1983년 3월 2일 출생한 이세돌 9단은 1995년 12세의 나이로 프로에 입단하여 친형인 프로 기사 이상훈과 함께 국내 두 번째 형제 기사가 되었다. 이세돌은 2000년 제5회 박카스배 천원전에서 처음으로 국내 대회 우승을 차지했으며, 2002년 제15회 후지쯔배에서 첫 국제대회 타이틀을 획득했다. 이듬해인 2003년에는 최고 단인 9단으로 승단하였다. 이세돌 9단은 2010년 광저우 아시아 경기 대회 바둑 남자 단체전에서 금메달을 목에 걸었으며 2000년 이후 지금까지 30개가 넘는 국내 타이틀과 18개의 국제 타이틀을 획득했다.






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